FreshPatents.com Logo
stats FreshPatents Stats
47 views for this patent on FreshPatents.com
2014: 4 views
2013: 9 views
2012: 17 views
2011: 8 views
2010: 2 views
2009: 7 views
Updated: March 31 2014
newTOP 200 Companies filing patents this week


    Free Services  

  • MONITOR KEYWORDS
  • Enter keywords & we'll notify you when a new patent matches your request (weekly update).

  • ORGANIZER
  • Save & organize patents so you can view them later.

  • RSS rss
  • Create custom RSS feeds. Track keywords without receiving email.

  • ARCHIVE
  • View the last few months of your Keyword emails.

  • COMPANY DIRECTORY
  • Patents sorted by company.

Follow us on Twitter
twitter icon@FreshPatents

Exhaust system for enclosures for engine-powered equipment

last patentdownload pdfimage previewnext patent


Title: Exhaust system for enclosures for engine-powered equipment.
Abstract: A magnetic exhaust system is provided for facilitating the conducting of at least some of the exhaust gases, created by an internal combustion engine powered apparatus, such as an auxiliary electrical generator, from the engine's exhaust to a position external to an enclosure in which the apparatus is situated. The magnetic exhaust system is releasably connectable to the engine, and is configured to be applied to a wide range of apparatus and enclosure configurations. ...


- Chicago, IL, US
Inventors: Paul Schnackenberg, Bennie Joseph Schade
USPTO Applicaton #: #20080184702 - Class: 60324 (USPTO) -


view organizer monitor keywords


The Patent Description & Claims data below is from USPTO Patent Application 20080184702, Exhaust system for enclosures for engine-powered equipment.

last patentpdficondownload pdfimage previewnext patent

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates in general to engine-powered equipment, in particular, auxiliary power generators, and enclosures therefor.

2. Background Art

Auxiliary electrical generators, of the size and capacity typically used for residential applications and small businesses, often are simply constructed with the generator, prime mover (usually a gasoline-powered internal combustion engine), fuel tank, controls and other electronics all supported on a basic metal (often tubular) frame. Such configurations are usually not well suited to placement in exposed unprotected outdoor locations, because prolonged exposure to the elements can cause controls to become sticky or frozen, and may otherwise degrade the operation of the generator.

It has not been uncommon for generator users to place such devices in garages and other areas, within the residential or business structure, which can lead to potentially tragic results, primarily from the accumulation of i. c. engine exhaust products, including carbon monoxide, within the residential or building structure.

In part in an effort to discourage such imprudent placement of the generators, as well as to offer a more attractive commercial package, some auxiliary electrical generator manufacturers have provided purpose-designed enclosures, for placement at desired locations external to the customer's residential or business structure. Typically, such specially-designed and fabricated enclosures have structures which are tailored to that generator manufacturer's specific generator constructions, and may, in fact, not be commercially sold, except as part of the purchase of an overall auxiliary electrical power generation system, which may include not only the generator and enclosure, but also the electrical devices (such as transfer switches) which are required to enable the power to be safely fed into the residential or business structure's electrical system.

One of the issues which must be addressed when placing an i. c. engine-powered auxiliary electrical generator inside a weather-resistant enclosure, is the handling of the exhaust from the engine, so as to prevent build-up of gases within the enclosure, and to provide for a ready flow of “fresh” air into the enclosure, to enable the engine to “breathe”.

In enclosures, the designs of which are dedicated to the specific constructions of a particular manufacturer's generators, the provisions for conducting engine exhaust in an orderly manner from the engine to the ambient air outside of the generator are often highly specific, such that the enclosure and/or exhaust system members cannot readily be used with another manufacturer's generator or enclosure. Thus, there is a disincentive for prospective generator purchasers to “shop around” for the combination of generator and enclosure (potentially from different manufacturers) which best suits the prospective generator purchaser's needs, aesthetics and budget.

In addition to generators, there exist other engine-powered devices, such as compressors, pumps, etc., for which enclosures, having accommodations for dealing with the exhaust gases produced by the engines, are also desirable.

It would be desirable to provide an exhaust system, for use with engine-powered equipment, such as auxiliary electrical generators, which is adaptable for use with a variety of generator configurations from a variety of manufacturers.

It would also be desirable to provide a system for housing an engine-powered device, such as an auxiliary electrical generator, which can shelter the generator from the elements, and which is capable of adapting to a variety of generator configurations from a variety of manufacturers, to enable the orderly direction of at least some, if not most or all of the exhaust from the engine to the ambient air outside of the enclosure.

These and other desirable characteristics of the invention will become apparent in view of the present specification, including the claims, and drawings.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention comprises, in part, an exhaust apparatus, for use with an engine-powered apparatus that has been placed within an enclosure, the enclosure having at least one side wall, for facilitating passage of exhaust gases created by the engine from the interior of the enclosure to the exterior of the enclosure.

The exhaust apparatus comprises an inlet region, which operably configured to be releasably positioned proximate to an exit opening of an exhaust system component of the engine; a hose section, which is operably connected to the inlet region; and an outlet region, which is operably connected to the hose section, and operably configured to be further connected to an opening in the at least one side wall of an enclosure.

In an embodiment of the invention, the inlet region comprises a magnet cap, having a bell with an opening therein and a hollow cylindrical neck connected to the bell and aligned with the opening, and a magnet, disposed in the bell, the magnet having an aperture therethrough which is aligned with the opening and the neck. The magnet cap and magnet enable magnetic positioning of the inlet region on an engine, proximate to the exit opening of the exhaust system component for receiving an exhaust stream therefrom.

In an embodiment of the invention, the inlet region further comprises a skirt, operably connected to the neck of the magnet cap, the skirt having a leading edge which circumferentially surrounds the neck so as to define an air gap therebetween, for enabling gases other than exhaust gases, which may be surrounding the inlet region, to be drawn in and entrained with exhaust gases passing through the neck, for mixture with and cooling of the exhaust gases.

The present invention also includes an enclosure system for an engine-powered apparatus. The enclosure system comprises an enclosure, having at least two side walls; and an exhaust apparatus, for facilitating passage of exhaust gases created by an engine of an engine-powered apparatus which has been positioned within the enclosure to a position exterior to the enclosure. The exhaust apparatus further comprises an inlet region, which operably configured to be releasably positioned proximate to an exit opening of an exhaust system component of the engine; a hose section, which is operably connected to the inlet region; and an outlet region, which is operably connected to the hose section, and operably connected to an opening in the at least one side wall of an enclosure.

In an embodiment of the enclosure system of the present invention, the inlet region may include a magnet cap, having a bell with an opening therein and a hollow cylindrical neck connected to the bell and aligned with the opening, and a magnet, disposed in the bell, the magnet having an aperture therethrough which is aligned with the opening and the neck, the magnet cap and magnet enabling magnetic positioning of the inlet region on an engine, proximate to the exit opening of the exhaust system component for receiving an exhaust stream therefrom. The inlet region may include a skirt, operably connected to the neck of the magnet cap, the skirt having a leading edge which circumferentially surrounds the neck so as to define an air gap therebetween, for enabling gases other than exhaust gases, which may be surrounding the inlet region, to be drawn in and entrained with exhaust gases passing through the neck, for mixture with and cooling of the exhaust gases.

In an embodiment of the enclosure system of the present invention, a fan may be operably mounted to one of the at least two side walls. An aperture may be provided, through the one of the at least two side walls and aligned with the fan, the fan being oriented so as to draw ambient air into the enclosure when in operation, the fan being operably connectable to an engine of an apparatus which has been positioned within the enclosure, to derive actuation and power therefrom. The enclosure may further include at least one vent opening disposed in a side wall of the enclosure. A louver may be mounted in the at least one vent opening. The louver may be rotatable.

Removable clamps may be used to attach the inlet and/or outlet regions to the hose section of the exhaust structure.

The skirt of the inlet region may be attached to the neck of the magnet cap by a wire framework.

Alternatively, the hose section may be operably configured to be articulatable, so as to enable positioning of the inlet region proximate an exit opening of an exhaust system of an engine, without requiring affixation of the inlet region to any portion of the engine.

In an alternative embodiment of the invention, the inlet region comprises an inlet nozzle, operably configured to be positioned adjacent an exhaust structure of an engine for receiving an exhaust stream therefrom; and a skirt, operably connected to an exit portion of the inlet nozzle, the skirt having a leading edge which circumferentially surrounds the exit portion of the inlet nozzle so as to define an air gap therebetween, for enabling gases other than exhaust gases, which may be surrounding the inlet region, to be drawn in and entrained with exhaust gases passing through the inlet nozzle, for mixture with and cooling of the exhaust gases.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an exhaust connector according to a preferred embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 2 is another perspective view of the exhaust connector according to the embodiment of FIG. 1, showing, in particular, the magnetic connection for attachment to an exhaust apparatus of the engine for an auxiliary electrical generator.

FIG. 3 is an end elevation of the magnet cap for the magnetic connection of FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a side elevation of the magnet cap.

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the magnet cap.

FIG. 6 is a side elevation, in section, of the exhaust connector according to the embodiment of FIGS. 1-5.

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a representative enclosure which may be used in association with the magnetic exhaust system of the present invention.

FIG. 8 is a view of the interior of an enclosure, such as that shown in FIG. 7, and looking downward, showing also the connection of a magnetic exhaust system, according to the present invention, to the exhaust system component of the engine of an auxiliary electrical generator which has been placed within the enclosure.

FIG. 9 is a schematic illustration of the structure and operation of the inlet end of the magnetic exhaust system according to a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 10 is a schematic illustration of the structure and operation of the outlet end of the magnetic exhaust system according to a preferred embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 11 is a perspective view, from above, of the engine-powered device shown in FIG. 8, without the exhaust system of the present invention, to show the exhaust exit of the engine-powered device.

FIG. 12 is a side elevation of the engine-powered device shown in FIG. 11.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

While this invention is susceptible of embodiment in many different forms, there is shown in the drawings and described in detail a specific embodiment, with the understanding that the present disclosure is to be considered an exemplification of the principles of the invention and is not intended to limit the invention to the embodiment illustrated.

A preferred embodiment of the invention is illustrated in FIGS. 1-12. Exhaust apparatus 20 is shown in perspective in FIG. 1. Exhaust apparatus 20 includes inlet region 22, outlet region 24 and hose section 26. Inlet region 22 includes magnet cap 28, clip 30, skirt 32, and clamp 34. Outlet region 24 includes fitting 36, skirt 38, and clamp 40. All of the foregoing components are preferably fabricated from metal material, preferably a metal which is resistant to attack from moisture, thermal cycling (such as would be encountered in an outdoor environment in a location with seasonal climactic changes) and the corrosive effectives of internal combustion engine exhaust. Hose section 26 is likewise preferably fabricated as a high temperature flexible hose. Any suitable material may be used, such as aluminized fiberglass or metal or the like.

Inlet region 22 is shown in further detail in FIG. 2, wherein magnet cap 28 is shown holding a donut-shaped (in a preferred embodiment) flat magnet 42, having a central aperture 44. Magnet 42 may be of any suitable style or material; however, preferably magnet 42 will be formed from a magnetic material that has a sufficiently strong enough magnetic field so as to withstand being vibrated off of the exhaust structure of a generator's i. c. engine when the engine is running. Magnet 42 may be held in the bell 54 of magnet cap 22 by any suitable means, including, but not limited to, gluing, pressure-fit, etc. Bell 54 is preferably configured as a broad flat cylindrical cup with an opening located preferably centrally in the disc portion of the cup.

Magnet cap 28 includes cylindrical neck 46 having a central bore (not shown), which preferably is situated concentrically with aperture 44 of magnet 42. Cylindrical collar 48 is positioned around a portion of neck 46. Clip 30 is configured as a bent wire framework, portions of which pass through circumferentially spaced apertures 50 in skirt 32, and other portions of which are inserted into the circumferential gap between collar 48 and neck 46. The fit between the inserted portions of clip 30 and neck 46 may be a forced fit, or other affixation, such as spot welding, may be employed. Clip 30 connects collar 48 to skirt 32 so that skirt 32 is flexibly, yet inseparably connected to magnet cap 22.

While skirt 32 is shown as having a crenellated portion to which clip 30 is attached, in alternative embodiments of the invention, the crenellated portion may be replaced with a smooth cylindrical section, a polygonal section, etc. Skirt 32 also includes conical transition section 52, which, in a preferred embodiment of the invention, terminates in a smaller diameter conical section 96, which is insertably received into one end of hose section 26, and secured thereto by clamp 34. Clamp 34 may be an otherwise conventional screw-tightened hose clamp. In alternative embodiments of the invention, other methods may be employed to secure skirt 32 to hose section 26, such as mechanical crimping, welding or brazing, etc. Magnet cap 28 is illustrated in FIGS. 3-5, and includes bell 54, neck 46 with bore 56.

FIG. 6 illustrates, schematically, exhaust apparatus 20 in a sectional side elevation. Clip 30 is shown attached to neck 46 of magnet cap 28 by another clamp 58, which, again, may be a screw-tightened hose clamp as are known in the art. Skirt 38 includes neck portion 60, which is affixed to the outlet end of hose section 26 by clamp 40 (again, shown in this embodiment as a screw-tightened hose clamp). Alternatively, neck portion 60 may be attached to the outlet end of hose section 26 by crimping, welding or brazing, or any other suitable method. Skirt 38 further includes transitional section 62, and cylindrical section 64, which is affixed to enclosure fitting 36 (to be described in further detail hereinbelow) by clamp 68 (again, shown in this embodiment as a screw-tightened hose clamp, but which may be replaced by crimping, welding or brazing, or any other suitable method). Enclosure fitting 36 includes flange 92 (not shown in FIG. 1). Fitting 36 may be attached to cylindrical section 64 of skirt 38 by a further clamp 68 (or by crimping, welding or brazing, etc.)

As shown in FIGS. 7, 8, 11 and 12, a commercially available enclosure 70 is provided, which is suitably sized to comfortably receive in its interior an engine-powered device, e.g., auxiliary electrical generator 72. Enclosure 70, which preferably is fabricated from molded plastic, is modified to include louvers 74, which are placed in one or more vent openings in one or more side walls of enclosure 70. The number and placement of the vent openings may be selected according to various design considerations or otherwise determined empirically to obtain the most efficient air flow. Louvers 74 are preferably round and may be configured to be rotated, so as to direct exiting air in various directions as may be desired. Louvers 74 preferably are located so that heat created by generator 72 is effectively removed. A hole is cut at a suitable location, into side wall 82 of enclosure 70, to which fitting 36 is attached. A low-pressure, high-volume fan 94 (shown in broken lines in FIG. 7) is also mounted, at a suitable location to, e.g., an inside surface of side wall 82 of enclosure 70, with fan inlet 84 enabling passage of ambient air into the fan, and thus into the interior of enclosure 70. For reasons further detailed hereinbelow, it is preferable that fan 94 be mounted to the side wall nearest the exhaust structure and grille 76 of the engine of generator 72. Fan 94 is suitably connected to generator 72, such as by simply being plugged into one of the standard household-type power outlets with which auxiliary electrical generators are typically provided, and operably configured so that fan 94 is powered up by generator 72 at startup. Fan 94 is oriented so as to pull ambient air into enclosure 70, to create a positive pressure gradient between the enclosure interior and the ambient air, as well as for purposes of drawing in cooler ambient air to aid in removal of the heated air within enclosure 70.

Louvers 74, preferably spaced for optimum heat removal, permit a portion of the pressurized air drawn into the interior of enclosure 70 back out of enclosure 70, to remove at least some of the heat created by generator 72. High strength magnet 42 is positioned over the exhaust exit pipe 100 (see FIGS. 11 and 12), with the magnet attached to grille 76. While in the illustrated embodiment, magnet cap 28 is attached to a grille of an engine's exhaust system, in some engines the grille may be absent, and magnet cap 28 could be attached directly to the exhaust exit pipe 100, or other similar structure. It is to be understood that some engines may alternatively have an exposed pipe or other exhaust system components, to which magnet cap 28 may be attached.

As mentioned hereinabove, magnet 42 has a sufficiently strong magnetic field so as to maintain inlet region 22 of exhaust system 20 held in position against grille 76 during operation of generator 72. The magnetic attachment mechanism of the present invention permits rapid installation and removal, as well as flexibility of positioning of inlet region 22 of exhaust apparatus 20, and still can remain aligned with grille 76 should generator vibration cause movement of generator 72, as a whole, during operation.

The operation of exhaust system 20 is schematically illustrated in FIGS. 9 and 10. Gases 78 at the exit from a typical generator exhaust structure may exceed 1000° F. and travel at a high velocity. Once generator 72 is installed in enclosure 70, the exhaust gases 78 exit the muffler (not shown), and then enter suitably aligned center bore 56 of magnet cap 28, passing through aperture 44 of magnet 42. Inertia causes gases 78 to continue through and exit enclosure 70 via a small tube 80 located in side wall 82, still at high velocity.

As gases 78 exit neck 46 of magnet cap 28, in-drawn cool ambient air 84 (which has just exited nearby fan 94) is entrained into inlet region 22 of exhaust apparatus 20, through gap 86 between bell 56 and leading edge 88 of skirt 32. Mixed gases 90 (comprising exhaust gases 78 and in-drawn ambient air 84) exit inlet region 22 and proceed through hose section 26 (not shown in FIG. 9). Continuing through hose section, the cool ambient air and the hot exhaust air mix, resulting in a substantial drop in exhaust gas temperature. It is believed that by the time mixed gases 90 approach outlet region 24, the temperature may be reduced to well below 500° F. Approaching side wall 82 of enclosure 70, cooled mixed gases 90 enter outlet region 24. Mixed gases 90 are further cooled by expansion as they pass through conical skirt 38, and the velocity of mixed gases 90 decreases, as well. Outlet flange 92 is used to attach outlet region 24 of exhaust apparatus 20 to side wall 82 of enclosure 70, and provides physical separation of skirt 38 from side wall 82, to provide further thermal isolation of side wall 82 from skirt 38.

In the foregoing description of a preferred embodiment of the invention, clip 30 and clamps 34, 40, 58 and 68 are used to attach the various respective components together. This enables rapid assembly and disassembly of exhaust apparatus 20, and further enables the replacement of individual components, should one or more components become worn, or corroded through the action of the corrosive exhaust gases and/or such moisture as may enter shelter 70 (or form there, e.g., as dew). However, should a more permanent or integral exhaust apparatus be desired, the clip and clamps may be replaced by other affixation methods, as described hereinabove.

A magnetically attached hose is but one exhaust structure contemplated in the shelter system of the present invention, which can be used with the other structural features of the shelter, to provide for protection of an engine-powered apparatus, while addressing exhaust and ventilation needs. Instead of a magnet, the inlet end of the exhaust structure may be held in place by suitably configured clamps or clips, or by fastening hardware. Alternatively, the exhaust structure may incorporate a hose which may be affixed at only the end which joins or passes through, the side wall of the shelter, but which is otherwise self-supporting, such as by an articulated, flexible, but self-supporting hose, such as the type which may be called “goose-neck” structures. The inlet end of the exhaust structure would still incorporate a structure similar to the one illustrated, in that the air gap between the skirt and the magnet cap (which simply would not have a magnet, but would still serve as the inlet for the exhaust gases).

As mentioned hereinabove, the present invention is not limited solely to applications involving engine-powered electrical generators. Rather, the present invention may be used with many different types of engine-powered devices, such as air compressors, pumps (for water, hydraulic fluid, or other fluids), etc. In such applications, the fan may be powered by a source of electricity external to the engine-powered device being housed in the shelter, such as by an extension cord running from an indoor or, preferably, outdoor electrical outlet of a residence.

In addition, while generators and other such engine-powered devices typically use reciprocating, piston-powered internal combustion engines as the prime movers, the present invention may be used in association with other types of power sources, such as rotary i. c. engines, external combustion engines, potentially even turbines or fuel cells, without departing from the principles and scope of the present invention.

The foregoing description and drawings merely explain and illustrate the invention, and the invention is not limited thereto, except as those skilled in the art who have the present disclosure before them will be able to make modifications and variations therein without departing from the scope of the invention.

Advertise on FreshPatents.com - Rates & Info


You can also Monitor Keywords and Search for tracking patents relating to this Exhaust system for enclosures for engine-powered equipment patent application.
###
monitor keywords



Keyword Monitor How KEYWORD MONITOR works... a FREE service from FreshPatents
1. Sign up (takes 30 seconds). 2. Fill in the keywords to be monitored.
3. Each week you receive an email with patent applications related to your keywords.  
Start now! - Receive info on patent apps like Exhaust system for enclosures for engine-powered equipment or other areas of interest.
###


Previous Patent Application:
Exhaust gas purifying device for internal combustion engine
Next Patent Application:
Method for regulating a hydrostatic drive system
Industry Class:

Thank you for viewing the Exhaust system for enclosures for engine-powered equipment patent info.
- - - Apple patents, Boeing patents, Google patents, IBM patents, Jabil patents, Coca Cola patents, Motorola patents

Results in 0.47946 seconds


Other interesting Freshpatents.com categories:
Qualcomm , Schering-Plough , Schlumberger , Texas Instruments ,

###

All patent applications have been filed with the United States Patent Office (USPTO) and are published as made available for research, educational and public information purposes. FreshPatents is not affiliated with the USPTO, assignee companies, inventors, law firms or other assignees. Patent applications, documents and images may contain trademarks of the respective companies/authors. FreshPatents is not affiliated with the authors/assignees, and is not responsible for the accuracy, validity or otherwise contents of these public document patent application filings. When possible a complete PDF is provided, however, in some cases the presented document/images is an abstract or sampling of the full patent application. FreshPatents.com Terms/Support
-g2-0.2158
     SHARE
  
           

FreshNews promo


stats Patent Info
Application #
US 20080184702 A1
Publish Date
08/07/2008
Document #
11701892
File Date
02/02/2007
USPTO Class
60324
Other USPTO Classes
International Class
01N7/08
Drawings
9



Follow us on Twitter
twitter icon@FreshPatents