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System and method for manufacturing asphalt products with recycled asphalt shingles

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20140014000 patent thumbnailZoom

System and method for manufacturing asphalt products with recycled asphalt shingles


A method for manufacturing a processed asphalt suspension is provided. The method includes dry grinding shingle waste material to a particle size of less than 1 cm, forming ground recycled shingle material, introducing virgin asphalt into a heated slurry tank and mixing the ground recycled shingle material with the virgin asphalt in the heated slurry tank, forming a mixed asphalt slurry, introducing the mixed asphalt slurry into a wet grinding machine, and recovering a processed asphalt suspension comprising particles having a size no greater than about 200 microns. Roofing and paving products manufactured from the processed asphalt suspension are also provided.
Related Terms: Shingle Shingles

Owens Corning Intellectual Capital, LLC - Browse recent Corning patents - Toledo, OH, US
USPTO Applicaton #: #20140014000 - Class: 1062731 (USPTO) -


Inventors: Michael R. Franzen, David Charles Trumbore, Laurand H. Lewandowski, Herb Wissel, James E. Burkett, Barry Garriett Hornbacher, Christian Peregrine, Anthony Kriech

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The Patent Description & Claims data below is from USPTO Patent Application 20140014000, System and method for manufacturing asphalt products with recycled asphalt shingles.

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This non-provisional utility patent application claims priority to and the benefits of U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 61/671,742 filed on Jul. 15, 2012 and to U.S. Provisional Application No. 61/728,891, filed on Nov. 21, 2012, each entitled System and Method for Manufacturing Roofing Products with Recycled Asphalt Shingles. Each application is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.

BACKGROUND

The present invention relates generally to asphalt products, including processed asphalt compositions, that include recycled shingle material. More particularly the present invention relates to methods and apparatuses for forming processed asphalt suspensions, including mixing systems and process methods for creating performance enhanced asphalt compositions used in asphalt products.

Asphalt roofing shingles make up over two-thirds of the residential roofing market for both new homes and roof replacements. However, the high volume production of asphalt shingles leads to the production of significant waste, not only during the manufacture of the shingles, but also through removal (“tear-off”) of used shingles. In fact, it is estimated that 11 million tons of shingle waste is produced each year and approximately 10 million of these tons end up buried in landfills. The waste generated from the asphalt roofing products is concerning, since the shingles themselves do not degrade and stay permanently in the landfill. This and the fact that there is considerable raw material value in the shingles has resulted in significant efforts in recycling all types of roofing materials for a variety of purposes.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,848,755 to Zickell et al. discloses an asphalt roofing material recycling system used to recycle asphalt materials, such as asphalt shingles and tar paper that include granules, fibers or other particles. The asphalt material is simultaneously heated and milled in a heated milling apparatus, such as a heated ball mill, to reduce the size of the asphalt material granules in suspension in liquid asphalt.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,290,152 B1 to Zickell discloses that asphalt material is simultaneously heated and milled in a heated milling apparatus such as a heated ball mill. Excess moisture is removed from the asphalt material by continuously venting the heated ball mill apparatus.

U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2010/0129667 to Kalkanoglu et al. discloses roofing products that are made from recycled roofing materials. The recycled roofing materials can be processed in an attritor or other media mixer to reduce the size of roofing granules and fibers.

BRIEF

SUMMARY

The general inventive concepts are directed to a method for manufacturing roofing products using a processed asphalt suspension. The method includes pre-processing shingle waste material by grinding the material to a first minimum size, forming ground recycled shingle material. The preferred process for preparing the shingles is to dry grind the waste shingles using horizontal or vertical shaft impactors or hammer mills. This minimizes moisture in the ground shingles and allows removal of metallic particles. This ground recycled shingle from either of these processes produces a particle less than 1 cm. The ground recycled shingles are stored in a dry condition until further processing to make a processed asphalt suspension. According to some exemplary embodiments, the ground shingles are processed in a vibratory screen deck or trommel screen to remove the granules and metallic material before being used to make the processed asphalt suspension.

The process of making the processed asphalt suspension may begin with a heated slurry tank. The tank may be partially filled with virgin asphalt with a preferred temperature between 150-260° C. The virgin asphalt is manufactured to produce a processed asphalt suspension with rheological properties appropriate to the end use application. An antifoam agent is optionally added to the top of the mixed virgin asphalt to prevent excessive foaming of the ground shingles from trapped moisture. The ground recycled shingle material may then be added to the slurry tank, forming a mixed asphalt slurry. The ground recycled shingles are added slowly to the slurry tank to control moisture released as steam. The mixer is powerful enough to keep the asphalt material in suspension as any residual trace amounts of water trapped in the ground recycled shingle is released as steam in the vented tank and until the slurry is pumped to the next step in the process. The tank may also be heated to bring the mixed asphalt slurry to the proper temperature of 150-260° C. before pumping to the attritor or ball mill. This embodiment of producing a completely dry processed asphalt prevents foaming of the slurry in the attritor or ball mill from even low (<0.5% moisture) levels of water trapped in the shingles.

The mixed asphalt slurry may then be fed into a wet grinding mill, such as an attritor or stirred vertical or horizontal ball mill. This device reduces the size of mineral matter and agglomerates, including granules or fiberglass, until 90% of the mineral matter or agglomerates is less than about 150 micron in size and 50% is less than about 50 micron in size. This sizing minimizes settlement in transport and storage.

A wide range of virgin asphalts, including un-oxidized, air rectified, and oxidized asphalts as well as asphalt oxidized in the presence of catalyst or asphalts modified by waxes, oils or other additives may be used and are discussed in more detail below. The mixture should spend enough time in the wet grinding machine to not only reduce the size of the mineral particles, but also to fully incorporate the asphalt from the recycled ground shingle material into the virgin asphalt, thereby getting full use of the recycled asphalt as a processed asphalt suspension

The foregoing and other objects, features, and advantages of the general inventive concepts will become more readily apparent from a consideration of the detailed description that follows.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The present invention will be described with reference to the attached drawings which are given as non-limiting examples.

FIG. 1 is a schematic diagram of the processes of producing the ground recycled shingle material and the processed asphalt suspension according to one embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a schematic diagram of an exemplary attritor or ball mill.

FIG. 3 illustrates a graphical regression analysis that depicts the softening point of the exemplary roofing products made with the processed asphalt suspensions compositions listed in Table 1.

FIG. 4 illustrates the unexpected beam fatigue properties for the processed asphalt suspension in an asphalt concrete beam after 100,000 cycles loading compared to a control pavement without the processed asphalt suspension.

FIG. 5 illustrates the improved dynamic modulus (E*) for an exemplary asphalt concrete mixture containing the processed asphalt suspension in comparison to a straight virgin asphalt mixture.

FIG. 6 illustrates the viscosity of exemplary calcite asphalt mixes.

FIG. 7 illustrates the viscosity of exemplary talc asphalt mixes.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The present invention is directed to methods and apparatuses for producing roofing or paving products using a processed asphalt suspension composition. The present application uses asphalt shingle material that is reduced down to a particle size fine enough to effectively reuse the recycled shingle material. That is, the granules in the asphalt shingles are removed, or they are reduced to a mesh fine enough to be incorporated into newly manufactured products, such as roofing or paving materials, without encountering significant settling of the particles in the manufacturing process, shipment or storage. In some exemplary embodiments, the recycled ground shingle materials are used to produce a processed asphalt suspension that combines virgin asphalt material and recycled shingle material that is tailored to a specific end use. The asphalt in the recycled ground shingle material may be intimately mixed with specially formulated virgin asphalt so that the recycled asphalt may be completely assimilated into the asphalt phase and the final properties of the slurry are optimal for a particular end use. In this application the term “virgin asphalt” refers to asphalt that is not recycled. The intimate mixing brings the aged asphalt back into a useful state.

The term “processed asphalt suspension” refers to a mixture of virgin asphalt and recycled shingles and optionally other materials, such as, for example, oils, waxes, polymers, and/or fine mineral fillers. The asphalt products produced may include any type of asphalt product desired by one skilled in the art, including, but not limited to roofing low slope or steep slope roofing applications as well as paving asphalt binders. Such roofing applications may include hot applied roofing adhesives, modified shingle adhesives, modified bitumen membranes, asphalt coated glass plies and base sheets, asphaltic overlayment protection boards, organic roofing felts, roofing cements, cold adhesives, and mastics. Paving asphalt applications include modified asphalt binders for hot mix asphalt, warm mix asphalt and cold mix asphalt used in constructing roads, parking lots, airfields, or walking paths.

The processed asphalt suspension composition used to produce the processed asphalt products in accordance with the present invention may be formed through a process that blends one or more recycled asphalt materials, such as roofing shingles, that were recovered, such as from old torn off roofs, from manufacturing waste, or both, with virgin asphalt. The virgin asphalts used in this invention may include any variety of vacuum tower bottoms from the distillation of petroleum crude oil and further solvent de-asphalted residua made from those vacuum tower bottoms. Vacuum tower bottoms from re-refining of crankcase oil may also be used.

The virgin asphalts may be used in blends with each other, or the asphalts and blends of asphalts may be oxidized to raise the softening point, as determined according to ASTM D36, and lower the penetration, as determined according to ASTM D5. Catalysts, such as ferric chloride or any form of phosphoric acid, may be used in the oxidation process. Waxes and oils from petroleum or non-petroleum sources may also be incorporated into the virgin asphalt prior to incorporating the virgin asphalt or after manufacturing the processed asphalt suspension. In some exemplary embodiments, the recycled roofing shingles have an asphalt content of from about 15 to 40%, with the remainder of the product being mineral and glass mat or organic felt. Although the asphalt products of the subject invention will be described herein as including ground recycled asphalt shingles (“RAS”) as the asphalt additive, it should be appreciated that any asphalt additive may be used in addition to RAS. The method for processing the virgin asphalt and additive together unexpectedly results in enhanced characteristics in the resulting modified asphalt for roofing materials with enhanced durability. In addition, modified asphalt for paving materials, such as binders, showing enhanced and unexpected fatigue properties in the resulting pavement.

Asphalt shingles are generally composed of a filled asphalt (which contains an oxidized roofing asphalt and mineral filler). In some exemplary embodiments, the filler comprises calcium limestone or dolomitic limestone fillers in a ratio of 65% filler 35% shingle coating asphalt. This filled asphalt coats a mat made of materials, such as fiberglass or fabric. On the coated mat, granules of different colors may be placed to give the shingle appearance desired by the homeowner. These colors may be achieved by baking a ceramic coating on the granules, such as, for example, a coating composed of basalt or granite. When the old shingles are removed from the roof at the end of their usefulness they are often mixed with other debris from the tear-off, such as wood, nails and metal (gutters) that may be taken off the roof, as well as paper and plastic from the new roofing shingles packaging which are being placed back onto the roof. The mixed roofing materials from the tear-off should be processed to remove debris before grinding the shingle material.

The asphalt shingles may be ground in a wide variety of different ways, such as, for example, horizontal or vertical impact crushers. According to some exemplary embodiments, the method includes dry processing and avoids any addition of water to the process. The standard grinding process is a one-step process of shredding, grinding or milling asphalt shingles and predominantly generates particles less than 1 cm. In this process, metal particles may be removed magnetically to minimize their presence. According to some exemplary embodiments, the ground shingles from this process break up into three basic particle sizes. The coarse fraction from 1.0 cm to #8 sieve (2380 micron) is comprised primarily of asphalt coated glass or fabric. This fraction is generally the highest in asphalt content. The mid size fraction, #8 mesh (2380 micron) to #30 mesh (595 micron), is primarily ceramic coated granules and is the lowest in asphalt content. The smallest fraction is less than #30 mesh (595 micron) and is comprised primarily of mineral filler and roofing asphalt. The ground recycled shingles can be separated into three sizes at this point using standard screening methods to fractionate the materials to remove different components before further processing if desired. This screening works best when moisture content is <3%.

FIG. 1 illustrates a schematic diagram of an exemplary process of producing processed asphalt suspension according to one embodiment of the invention. As shown in FIG. 1, after the shingle material is ground, the ground or shredded recycled shingle particles may be stored in a dry condition (i.e., <3% moisture), such as under a roof, until used to make the processed asphalt suspension. The process of making the processed asphalt suspension may begin with a slurry tank as illustrated in FIG. 1. The slurry tank may be partially filled with virgin asphalt and heated to a temperature between 150-260° C. The virgin asphalt is manufactured to produce a finished processed asphalt suspension with rheological properties tailored for the end use application desired. An antifoam agent may optionally be added to the top of the mixed virgin asphalt to control foaming of the shingles which contain low levels of trapped moisture. According to some exemplary embodiments, the recycled shingles are added slowly to the heated slurry tank to control the rate of steam release from the asphalt slurry of ground shingles and virgin asphalt. The tank agitation should be effective enough to keep the mixed asphalt slurry in suspension. The tank may be externally heated to prevent buildup on the coils and abrasion from mineral matter while mixing the mixed asphalt slurry. The heating also brings the mixed asphalt slurry to the proper temperature of 150-260° C. before pumping to the attritor or ball mill. This process produces a completely dry mixed asphalt slurry which prevents foaming of the asphalt in the attritor or ball mill from even low (<0.5% moisture) levels of water trapped in the shingles. Drying shingles is often challenging since the shingles tend to agglomerate into large pieces as the shingles are heated above the softening point of the asphalt, making handling as a particulate material difficult.

The mixed asphalt slurry may be fed to a wet grinding mill, such as an attritor or stirred vertical or horizontal ball mill. The term “wet grinding” is defined herein as a grinding process that includes a liquid asphalt component. In some exemplary embodiments, the grinding mill reduces the size of mineral matter including granules, fiberglass, or cellulosic fiber until about 90% is less than 150 micron and about 50% is less than the 50 micron size. This sizing minimizes settlement in transport and storage and assures complete mixing of virgin asphalt and asphalt in the RAS, forming a processed asphalt suspension.

The grinding of the virgin asphalt and RAS may be performed with any wet milling/grinding machine generally known and used in the art. In some embodiments, a grinding mill is used that contains internally agitated grinding media. The grinding material may comprise stirred balls, or otherwise shaped objects. One type of wet grinding mill is an attritor, which consists of a vessel, grinding media, and a mixing arm. The mixing arm may be rotated which agitates the materials and grinding media within the vessel. When the rotating arm is rotated at high speeds, the arm creates mixing in the media, which causes shearing and impact forces on the material inside the vessel. U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,464,163 to Zoz and 3,458,144 to Lessells et al. exemplify conventional attritors, incorporated by reference herein. The attritor may be a continuous attritor, wherein the virgin asphalt/RAS material continually moves into and out of the attritor. The attritor not only thoroughly mixes the RAS with the virgin asphalt, but also removes the outer coating on some additive particles, such that during the size reduction, internal components of the additive are exposed and blended homogenously with the virgin asphalt.

One exemplary process for recycling shingles and making a processed asphalt suspension is shown in FIG. 2. The attritor includes a vessel 1 which has a heating jacket or other means to heat the contents of the vessel 1 and a mixing bar 2. The attritor, whether batch or continuous, is sized based on desired production rate and the residence time needed for reduction of mineral size and incorporation of the ground recycled shingle asphalt into the virgin asphalt. The exemplary attritor in FIG. 2 is 400 liters in size. In some exemplary embodiments, hot oil may be circulated through a jacket on the vessel in order to keep the mixture at an appropriate viscosity. The mixing bar 2 extends into the vessel which, as depicted, includes a plurality of arms 3 extending outwardly from a central rotatable shaft of the mixing bar 2. The arms extend from different levels of the rotating shaft centered in the vessel. The mixing bar may then be rotated at high speed (about 100 to 1500 rpm), creating shearing and impact forces on the RAS material inside the vessel.

The vessel 1 may include grinding media 4 and, for purposes of the present invention, the grinding media may be preheated together with the mixing bar 2 and walls of the vessel 1. However, other grinding media materials and/or grinding media sizes may be used. The grinding material is agitated within the vessel, causing the inorganic component of the RAS to be ground into very fine particles, such that about 90% of the inorganic component is smaller than 150 microns and about 50% is smaller than 50 microns. Residence time in the attritor may be from about 5 to 10 minutes to higher times depending on the desired properties of the slurry. The final particle size may be tailored to a particular end use product to provide the most valuable filler for the specific product.

In some exemplary embodiments, the resulting processed asphalt suspension comprises very fine particles having a size no greater than about 150 to 200 microns. In some exemplary embodiments, the particles have a size no greater than about 100 microns, and particularly no greater than about 74 microns. Some products may require smaller particles, such as products that have unique rheological properties (i.e., mastics), or products that require a processed asphalt suspension that can withstand storage, shipping, and use at higher temperatures without significant settling of the particles. In some exemplary embodiments, the attritor system that creates the fine particles is a continuous process, in that water-free RAS/asphalt can be continuously pumped into the attritor and the resulting processed asphalt suspension may be continuously pumped from the attritor into a holding tank. The average residence time in the attritor will then be determined by the attritor size and the pump rate. The holding tank may be heated and may include an agitator or recirculation system sufficient to keep the particles in suspension. Alternatively, the processed asphalt suspension may be formed into a solid material by pouring into containers or pelletizing and then shipped to be used either cold or reheated.

In some embodiments, the asphalt comprising the RAS has a softening point between 30 and 110° C. In other exemplary embodiments, the asphalt is from torn off aged shingles and has a softening point of from 95 to 150° C. because of oxidative aging on the roof. The filler may comprise mineral granules, calcium carbonate or dolomite filler, talc or sand back-dusting in varying quantities depending on the source of the asphalt shingles. The RAS may also contain either glass mat or organic felt which have been reduced in size in the initial grinding process.

An exemplary embodiment includes the ability to further process the ground recycled shingles into different size fractions. This can be accomplished using vibratory screen decks to remove granules from the ground shingles. The remaining ground shingle fractions can be recombined to produce a ground recycled shingle material with higher asphalt content and less abrasive granule content. This low granule mixture reduces wear on mixing and grinding equipment from the basaltic granules.

In some exemplary embodiments, the processing steps of the present invention involve incorporating the ground RAS material into molten virgin asphalt, such as, for example, vacuum tower bottoms from petroleum distillation, oxidized vacuum tower bottoms, paving asphalts, oxidized paving asphalts, solvent de-asphalting residua, oxidized solvent de-asphalting residua, re-refined motor oil bottoms or combinations of any of the above, and subjecting the molten virgin asphalt and RAS to a combination of mixing and drying before being ground in a wet grinding mill, for example an attritor, to produce a processed asphalt suspension.

After the processed asphalt suspension has been produced, other additives may be added, such as waxes, polymers, chemicals, etc., such that the final product can be tailored “as needed” in post-processing steps for a particular manufacturing process. Some of these additives can also be added in prior processing steps.

EXAMPLES Production of Processed Asphalt Suspension

There are three main components in the production of processed asphalt suspension: processing of the RAS input material (FIG. 1: 1-4, 9), mixing and processing the processed asphalt suspension (FIG. 1: 5-7, 9), and storage of the processed asphalt suspension (FIG. 1: 8). Each component of the process will be described in the following example.

Processing of the Shingle Input Material

The quality of the shingle input material is critical to the production of the processed asphalt suspension. Quality refers to the amount of debris present, moisture content, and the size of the RAS after grinding and processing.

Debris is defined as the non-shingle materials present due to the tear off process (nails, flashing, wood, packaging for new shingles, etc.). Debris present during the processing is detrimental to the performance of the pumps, hoses, storage tanks, and mills used during the processing; however, minor amounts of debris, such as about 5% may be tolerated. Debris removal is accomplished through the use of magnets placed over conveyer belts in the grinding, sizing and slurry vessel addition processes (FIG. 1: 9) as well as hand sorting to remove wood, plastic, metal and plastic gutter as well as flashing.

Moisture content of the material should generally be less than about 3% to minimize foaming in the asphalt slurry vessel. Tear off shingles are typically delivered to the input processing site in open top roll off containers that are exposed to the weather for some period of time (FIG. 1: 1). The tear off shingles are dumped and placed under roof and sorted to remove debris. The processed shingles are then further processed through a dry grinder or vertical shaft impactor to reduce the size of the agglomerates (FIG. 1: 2). Neither the dry grinder nor vertical shaft impactor uses water and thus are termed dry grinders. Through this dry grinding step RAS input material is reduced to a size less than 1 cm and moisture is further reduced (FIG. 1: 2). Low levels of moisture (<3%) are important to the size separation step.

RAS input material in this example was further separated into sizes. A vibratory screen deck (FIG. 1: 4) was used to separate the material in the current example. Other separation techniques may also be used. A trommel screen is an example of an alternate separation technique. In this example, the material was separated into three sizes: material retained above #8 sieve (2360 microns), material retained above #30 sieve (595 microns) but at the same time smaller than #8 sieve (2360 microns), and material smaller than #30 sieve (595 microns). This sizing is for this example only and many other size splits may be selected as desired for a particular application (FIG. 1: 4).

Mixing of the RAS Processed Asphalt Suspension

A heated slurry tank with vigorous agitation was used for the RAS/asphalt slurry tank (FIG. 1: 6). The slurry tank was filled to about ⅓ of its volume with heated virgin asphalt and agitated. An antifoam agent was added to the virgin asphalt. Exemplary antifoam agents and defoamers that may be used include those which have been used in asphalt applications such as silicones. An equal amount, by weight, of RAS input material (in this example below #30 sieve (595 microns)), was added to the tank. RAS input material was added at a rate such that the base asphalt would not foam over the tank. Foaming may occur due to remaining moisture in the RAS input material. The RAS input material may always have some level of moisture making the rate of addition to the slurry tank an important safety issue, so venting is recommended. The rate of addition also influences the temperature of the slurry. In the present example, the slurry tank was kept at a temperature above 130° C. in order to maintain a viscosity in which the agitator can maintain operation. Once the modified asphalt slurry was produced, the slurry was further agitated and heated to a temperature of 180° C.

Processing the Modified Asphalt Slurry to Make Processed Asphalt Suspension

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stats Patent Info
Application #
US 20140014000 A1
Publish Date
01/16/2014
Document #
13833091
File Date
03/15/2013
USPTO Class
1062731
Other USPTO Classes
241 16
International Class
/
Drawings
8


Shingle
Shingles


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