FreshPatents.com Logo
stats FreshPatents Stats
9 views for this patent on FreshPatents.com
2013: 9 views
Updated: December 09 2014
newTOP 200 Companies filing patents this week


Advertise Here
Promote your product, service and ideas.

    Free Services  

  • MONITOR KEYWORDS
  • Enter keywords & we'll notify you when a new patent matches your request (weekly update).

  • ORGANIZER
  • Save & organize patents so you can view them later.

  • RSS rss
  • Create custom RSS feeds. Track keywords without receiving email.

  • ARCHIVE
  • View the last few months of your Keyword emails.

  • COMPANY DIRECTORY
  • Patents sorted by company.

Your Message Here

Follow us on Twitter
twitter icon@FreshPatents

Roofing tile system and method

last patentdownload pdfdownload imgimage previewnext patent

20130031864 patent thumbnailZoom

Roofing tile system and method


Provided is roofing tile system that includes a roofing tile having a substantially wedge shaped tile body. The tile body including a bottom surface to be disposed adjacent a roofing deck during use, a top surface angled relative to the bottom surface, such that a first end of the wedge shaped body has a first height and a second end of the tile body has a second height that is greater than the first height, and a recess extending into the bottom surface at the second end. The recess is shaped substantially complementary to the first end of the tile body.

USPTO Applicaton #: #20130031864 - Class: 52519 (USPTO) - 02/07/13 - Class 525 


Inventors: Zachary S. Schools, Donald L. Schools, Sr., Donald L. Schools, Jr.

view organizer monitor keywords


The Patent Description & Claims data below is from USPTO Patent Application 20130031864, Roofing tile system and method.

last patentpdficondownload pdfimage previewnext patent

BACKGROUND

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention generally relates to roofing systems and methods and more particularly to roofing tile systems and methods.

2. Description of Related Art

Roofs are typically installed on top of a structure (e.g., a home, commercial building, pavilion, etc.) to provide a barrier to environmental conditions. Roofs may shield an interior of a structure from environmental sun, wind, rain, hail and so forth. A roof often includes a plurality of shingles or tiles overlapped in a series of rows to provide a protective barrier. Roofing shingles and tiles are often formed of a variety of materials, including, for example, wood, asphalt, stone, clay, ceramics, and the like.

Roofing shingles and tiles are often overlapped and/or interlocked with one another to provide a roofing surface. For example, roofing tiles may be interlocked with adjacent roofing tiles to provide a system of interlocked tiles to provide a tiled roof surface. Unfortunately, roofing shingles and tiles may suffer from a number of issues. For example, interlocking tiles may include a variety of complex features that make them both difficult to manufacture and difficult to install. Moreover, once installed roofing shingles and tiles may not adequately protect the structure. For example, gaps between shingles and tiles may leave them susceptible to lift in windy conditions and may allow water to penetrate the roof and the underlying structure.

Accordingly it is desirable to provide a roofing member that is relatively simple to install and/or manufacture and/or provides an adequate barrier to the elements.

SUMMARY

Various embodiments of roofing systems and related apparatus, and methods of employing the same are described. In one embodiment, a method includes a roofing tile system that includes a roofing tile having a substantially wedge shaped tile body. The tile body includes a bottom surface to be disposed adjacent a roofing deck during use, a top surface angled relative to the bottom surface, such that a first end of the wedge shaped body has a first height and a second end of the tile body has a second height that is greater than the first height, and a recess extending into the bottom surface at the second end. The recess is shaped substantially complementary to the first end of the tile body.

In another embodiment, provided is a roofing system including a plurality of roofing tiles. The roofing tiles having a substantially wedge shaped tile body including a bottom surface to be disposed adjacent a roofing deck during use, a top surface angled relative to the bottom surface, such that a first end of the wedge shaped body has a first height and a second end of the tile body has a second height that is greater than the first height, and a recess extending into the bottom surface at the second end. The recess is shaped substantially complementary to the first end of the tile body. The first end of the roofing tiles is to be disposed within a recess of another one of the plurality of roofing tiles.

In another embodiment, provided is a roofing method that includes disposing, on a roofing surface, a first roofing tile having a substantially wedge shaped tile body that includes a bottom surface to be disposed adjacent a roofing deck during use, a top surface angled relative to the bottom surface, such that a first end of the wedge shaped body comprises a first height and a second end of the tile body has a second height that is greater than the first height, and a recess extending into the bottom surface at the second end. The recess is shaped substantially complementary to the first end of the tile body of the first roofing tile. The method further includes disposing, on the roofing surface, a second roofing tile having a substantially wedge shaped tile body that includes a bottom surface to be disposed adjacent a roofing deck during use, a top surface angled relative to the bottom surface, such that a first end of the wedge shaped body has a first height and a second end of the tile body has a second height that is greater than the first height, and a recess extending into the bottom surface at the second end. The recess is shaped substantially complementary to the first end of the tile body of the second roofing tile. The recess of the second tile is disposed over the first end of the first tile such that the first end of the first roofing tile is disposed within the recess of the second roofing tile and at least a portion of the first end of the first roofing tile is overlapped at least partially by at least a portion of the second end of the second tile.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Advantages of the present invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art with the benefit of the following detailed description and upon reference to the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a diagram that illustrates a tile roofing system in accordance with embodiments of the present technique;

FIGS. 2A and 2B are diagrams that illustrate a cross-sectioned perspective view and a cross-sectioned side view, respectively, of overlapping tiles of the roofing system in accordance with embodiments of the present technique;

FIGS. 3A-3G are diagrams that illustrate a topside perspective view, a bottom-side perspective view, a topside view, a side view, a bottom-side view, a left/upper-end view and a right/lower-end view, respectively, of a stacking tile of the roofing system in accordance with embodiments of the present technique;

FIGS. 4A-4G are diagrams that illustrate a topside perspective view, a bottom-side perspective view, a topside view, a side view, a bottom-side view, a left/upper-end view and a right/lower-end view, respectively, of a terminating tile of the roofing system in accordance with embodiments of the present technique;

FIG. 5 is a flow chart illustrating a method of installing the roofing system in accordance with embodiments of the present technique.

While the invention is susceptible to various modifications and alternative forms, specific embodiments thereof are shown by way of example in the drawings and will herein be described in detail. The drawings may not be to scale. It should be understood, however, that the drawings and detailed description thereto are not intended to limit the invention to the particular form disclosed, but to the contrary, the intention is to cover all modifications, equivalents, and alternatives falling within the spirit and scope of the present invention as defined by the appended claims.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

OF ILLUSTRATIVE EMBODIMENTS

As discussed in more detail below, certain embodiments of the present technique include a roofing tile system and method. In some embodiments, roofing tiles include a substantially wedge shape body having bottom and top surface angles relative to one another. In some embodiments, the wedge-shaped tile includes a substantially flat bottom surface and a flat top surface angled (e.g., about 0.5 degrees (°) to about 2 degrees (°) relative to the lower surface. In some embodiments, the angled upper surface may provide for a relatively thick lower-end and a relatively thin upper-end of each of the tiles. In certain embodiments, the substantially flat bottom surface may lie substantially flat against the supporting roofing surface/deck when installed, such that the bottom surface is substantially parallel to the supporting roofing surface/deck. In certain embodiments, an upper-end of each of the tiles may be overlapped by a lower-end of a tile stacked immediately above the tile on the supporting roofing surface/deck (e.g., lower end of tiles in a higher row overlapping upper ends of tiles in a lower row). In some embodiments, the bottom surface of the lower-end of each of the tiles includes a laterally extending recess/pocket that overlaps an upper end of tile(s) located immediately below the tile (e.g., tiles disposed in a lower row). In certain embodiments, the recess/pocket may be shaped substantially complementary to the wedge shaped upper end of the tiles such that a close fit is provided between the lower end of the tiles overlapping the upper ends of other tiles. In some embodiments, overlap between adjacent tiles is less than about 25% of their length. In certain embodiments, recesses, standoffs, or other texture may be provided on either of the bottom and top surfaces. In some embodiments, one or more fastener holes (e.g., for a nail or screw) is provided proximate the upper-end of the tiles. In certain embodiments, a single fastener hole is provided proximate the upper-end of the tiles. In some embodiments, a terminating/end tile to be disposed at the lower edge of the roof includes a substantially wedge shape and a lip extending downward from the bottom surface at or near a lower-end of the tile. In certain embodiments, the tiles may be formed from a lightweight composite, such as a lightweight concrete.

FIG. 1 is a diagram that illustrates a tile roofing system 100 in accordance with embodiments of the present technique. Roofing system 100 includes a plurality of roofing tiles 102 disposed on a roofing support surface/deck 104. Tiles 102 may be disposed in a series of overlapping rows 106a, 106b, and 106c (e.g., collectively referred to herein as rows 106) to form a tile roofing surface 107. Roofing surface 107 may include a lower portion/end 107a and an upper portion/end 107b. In some embodiments tiles 102 include a combination of stacking tiles 108 and end (e.g., terminating) tiles 110. As described herein, terminating tiles 110 may include tiles 102 to be disposed in a lower/first row of tiles (e.g., row 106a) located a lower edge/lip 112 of roofing support surface/deck 104. As described herein, stacking tiles 108 may include tiles 102 to be disposed in upper rows of tiles (e.g., rows 106a and 106b) disposed above one or more lower rows of tiles.

FIGS. 2A and 2B are diagrams that illustrate a cross-sectioned perspective view and a cross-sectioned side view, respectively, of overlapping tiles 102 of roofing system 100 in accordance with embodiments of the present technique. FIGS. 3A-3G are diagrams that illustrate a topside perspective view, a bottom/under-side perspective view, a topside view, a side view, a bottom/under-side view, a left/upper-end view and a right/lower-end view, respectively, of a stacking tile 108 of roofing system 100 in accordance with embodiments of the present technique. FIGS. 4A-4G are diagrams that illustrate a topside perspective view, a bottom/under-side perspective view, a topside view, a side view, a bottom/under-side view, a left/upper-end view and a right/lower-end view, respectively, of a terminating tile 110 of roofing system 100 in accordance with embodiments of the present technique.

Roofing support surface/deck (“roof deck”) 104 may include a structure on which tiles, shingles, or the like are disposed. In some embodiments, roof deck 104 may include a roofing material layer that is disposed between primary structural components (e.g., trusses and/or roof joints) and tiles 102. In some embodiments, roofing deck 104 may include a substantially flat deck surface 120 (see FIG. 2B). Roofing deck 104 may include plywood, oriented strand board (OSB), metal, composite, or the like. Roofing deck may include planar sheathing having a substantially flat outer/upper surface on which tiles 102 are to be disposed. Roofing deck 104 may be oriented flat or angled/slanted to define a roof pitch (see FIGS. 1A and 2A). A slanted/angled roof deck 104 may slope from an upper portion/end 104b to a lower portion/end 104a. The slant/angle may encourage water and other elements (e.g., debris) to flow/move in a downward direction from the upper portion toward the lower portion of roofing system 100. Accordingly, when tiles 102 are installed on roof deck 104, the resulting slant/angle/pith may encourage water and other elements (e.g., debris) to flow/move longitudinally across upper surfaces of tiles 102, in a downward direction from upper portion/end 107b to lower portion/end 107a of roofing surface 107.

Roofing surface 107 may include a plurality of rows 106 of tiles 102 to cover some, all, or substantially all of a roof deck 104. For example, in the illustrated embodiment row 106a of terminating tiles 110 is located at a lower end 107a of roofing surface 107, row 106b of staking tiles 108 is disposed immediately above row 106a, and a second row 106c of staking tiles 108 is disposed immediately above row 106a of stacking tiles 108. Although three rows 106 are depicted in the illustrated embodiments, roofing system 100 may include any number of rows extending between a lower portion/end 107a and an upper portion/end 107b. Rows 106 may extend from a lower end portion 104a of roof deck 104 to an upper end portion 104b of roof deck 104. In some embodiments, a lower end portion 110a of terminating tiles 110 may extend over a lower edge/lip 112 of roofing support surface/deck 104. In some embodiments, a lower end portion 108a of stacking tiles 108 may overlap upper end portions of tiles 102 located immediately there below. For example, each of stacking tiles 108 of row 106b may include a lower end portion 108a that overlaps an upper end portion 110b of terminating tiles 110, and each of stacking tiles 108 of row 106c may include a lower end portion 108a that overlaps an upper end portion 108b stacking tiles 108 of row 106b.

In some embodiments, tiles 102 of roofing surface 107 in adjacent rows may be laterally staggered/offset such that lateral (e.g., left and right) edges of tiles 102 do not align with (e.g., are offset from) the lateral edges of tiles 102 located in rows immediately above and/or immediately below. For example, as depicted in at least FIG. 1, tiles 108 of row 106b are laterally offset from terminating tiles 110 of row 106a and stacking tiles 108 by about 50% of their widths. In some embodiments, tiles may be staggered by different amounts (e.g., about 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% of their width). In some embodiments, tiles 102 may have a variety of different widths such that staggering/offset may occur as a result of the varying widths of adjacent tiles 102.

In some embodiments, a flashing or cap tile may be placed over upper ends of tiles 102 located at near the uppermost portion of roofing surface 107 to seal the upper end and/or facilitate the flow of water or other debris down the roofing surface 107. For example, where upper end portion 107b abuts a vertical wall, flashing may adhered to the wall and overlap upper end portions of stacking tiles 108 of row 106c. Where upper end portion 107b meet an upper end portion of an adjacent roofing surface 107 (e.g., to form a ridge), a cap tile (e.g., a substantially “V” shaped tile) may be placed atop the ridge to overlap upper end portions 107b of the roofing surfaces (e.g., overlap upper end portions of tiles located at the top rows of the roofing surfaces).

As depicted in at least FIGS. 3A-3G, stacking tiles 108 may include a generally wedge shaped body 200. Wedge shaped body 200 may include a bottom surface 202 and a top surface 204. Bottom surface 202 may include a substantially flat surface. Bottom surface 202 may define an underside of stacking tile 108 that is to be disposed on or near facing deck surface 120 of roofing deck 104 during use (see at least FIG. 2B). For example, stacking tile 108 may be disposed on deck surface 120 such that bottom surface 202 is in contact or near contact with deck surface 120. In some embodiments, bottom surface 202 may include a substantially flat surface. In some embodiments, bottom surface 202 may be substantially flush/parallel with deck surface 120 such that no gap or a minimal gap exists between bottom surface 202 and deck surface 120. Reducing a gap between bottom surface 202 and deck surface 120 may help to reduce pockets for air to pass through which may result uplift of tile 108 during windy conditions.

In some embodiments, bottom surface 202 may include one or more protrusions or recesses. Bottom surface 202 may include one or more standoffs (e.g., bumps, texture or other protrusions) that provide for a slight gap between bottom surface 202 and deck surface 120. Bottom surface 202 may include one or more recesses (e.g., cuts, grooves or other recesses) that provide for paths between bottom surface 202 and deck surface 120. Where water or other debris penetrates roofing surface 107, a slight gap and/or recess, may facilitate the flow of the water or other debris between deck surface 120 and bottom surface 202 such that the water or debris can be cleared from underneath tile 108. In some embodiments, the slight air gap may facilitate the passage of at least some air between deck surface 120 and bottom surface 202, e.g., to facilitate the drying of moisture underneath tile 108 and/or dispersal of heat.

Top surface 204 may define a top-side of stacking tile 108 that is exposed to the environment when staking tile 108 is disposed on roofing deck 104 during use (see at least FIG. 2B). For example, stacking tile 108 may be disposed on deck surface 120 such that top surface 204 is directly exposed to sun, rain, wind and other environmental conditions. In some embodiments, top surface 204 includes a substantially flat surface. In some embodiments, top surface 204 may include a texture (e.g., a texture that is impact resistant and/or reflective) or other surface features. Top surface 204 may extend from an upper end 206 to a lower end 208 of tile 108.

In some embodiments, top surface 204 is angled with respect to bottom surface 202. For example, in the illustrated embodiments, top surface 204 angles away from bottom surface 202 from upper end portion 108b to lower end portion 108a. In some embodiments, upper surface and lower surface are separated by an angle 210 of about 0.5° to about 3°. For example, angle 210 may be about 2°. An angle may selected to provide for a tile of a sufficient length with out a relatively large thickness, thereby providing for an increased coverage/surface area without substantially increasing the weight of tile 108 and, thus, without substantially increasing the weight of roofing surface 107.

In some embodiments, lower end portion 108a of stacking tile 108 includes a recess 216. Recess 216 may include a cut-out in body 202 that, during use, receives an upper end portion of a tile 102 located immediately below stacking tile 108. For example, when installed, recess 216 may receive (or otherwise be placed over) an upper end portion 108a of another stacking tile 108 and/or an upper end portion 110a of a terminating tile 110 (see at least FIGS. 1-2B).

In some embodiments, recess 216 includes a cut-out in bottom surface 202 at lower end 208 of stacking tile 108. In some embodiments, recess 216 includes a laterally extending cut-out that extends completely across a width of staking tile 108 (e.g., from a right to a left side of staking tile 108). (see at least FIGS. 3B and 3E). In some embodiments a length 220 of recess 216 is defined by a rear wall 222. Length 220 may be less than about 25% of a length of body 202 such that about 25% or less of adjacent tiles 102 is overlapped by stacking tile 102. In some embodiments a height 224 of pocket 216 is defined by top wall 226. Recess 216 may define a overlapping member 228 that includes a lower end portion 108a of tile 108 that overlaps an upper end portion of a tile 102 (e.g., upper end portions 108b of staking tile 108 and/or upper end portion 110b of terminating tile 110) disposed within recess 216 (see at least FIGS. 1-2B).

In some embodiments, recess 216 is shaped substantially complementary to upper end portions 108b of stacking tile 108 and/or upper end portions 110b of terminating tile 110. For example, end wall 222 of recess 216 may have a height 230 that is the same or substantially the same as a height 232 of upper end 206 of tile 108 and/or top wall 226 of recess 216 may be substantially parallel to top surface 204 of tile 108. For example, an angle 234 may be the same or substantially the same as angle 210. A height 236 of a lower end of recess 216 may be about the same as a thickness of body 202 at about a distance 220 from upper end 206.

In some embodiments, stacking tile 108 includes one or more fastener holes 240 extending there through. For example, in the illustrated embodiment, body 202 includes two fastener holes 240 disposed in upper end portion 108b of stacking tile 108. Fastener holes 240 may provide for the installation of mechanical fasteners (e.g., screws, nails or the like) 241 to secure tile 108 to roof deck 104. In some embodiments, fastener holes 240 may be located in a portion of body 202 such that they are covered by an overlapping member of an adjacent tile 102 when an upper end portion 108b of tile 108 is disposed within a complementary recess of the adjacent tile. For example, fastener holes 240 may be located at distance 242 from upper end 206 of tile 108. Distance 242 may be less than length 220 of recess 216 such that a portion of a tile 102 located immediately above tile 108 (e.g., overlapping member of another stacking tile located in a row above tile 108) covers fastener holes 240 (see at least FIGS. 2A-2B). In some embodiments, distance 242 may be about one-half of length 220 of recess 216. Covering of fastener holes 240 may shield the holes and fasteners from the environment to reduce the likelihood of water or other debris penetrating roofing surface 107 via holes 240. In some embodiments, no fastener holes may be provided. In some embodiments, only a single fastener hole 240 may be provided. For example, only one of depicted fastener holes 240 may be provided. In some embodiments, three or more fastener holes 240 may be provided.

In some embodiments, stacking tile 108 may include a substantially rectangular shape having a length 250 and a width 252. In some embodiments, length 250 may be about 15 inches (in), width 252 may be about 8 in, angles 210 and 234 may be about 2°, length 220 may be about 3 in, height 230 at upper end of recess 216 may be about ¼ in, height 232 of upper end 206 of tile 108 may be about ¼ in, height 236 of lower end of recess 216 may be about 7/16 in, height 254 of tile 108 at a lower end 208 may be about ¾ in, and fastener holes 240 may be a distance 242 of about 1¾ in (e.g., 1.75 in) from upper end 206.

As depicted in at least FIGS. 4A-4G, terminating tiles 110 may include a generally wedge shaped body 300. Wedge shaped body 300 may include a bottom surface 302 and a top surface 304. Bottom surface 302 may include a substantially flat surface. Bottom surface 302 may define an underside of terminating tile 110 that is to be disposed on or near facing deck surface 120 of roofing deck 104 during use (see at least FIG. 2B). For example, terminating tile 110 may be disposed on deck surface 120 such that bottom surface 302 is in contact or near contact with deck surface 120. In some embodiments, bottom surface 302 may include a substantially flat surface. In some embodiments, bottom surface 302 may be substantially flush/parallel with deck surface 120 such that no gap or a minimal gap exists between bottom surface 302 and deck surface 120. Reducing a gap between bottom surface 302 and deck surface 120 may help to reduce pockets for air to pass through which may result in uplift of tile 110 during windy conditions.

In some embodiments, bottom surface 302 may include one or more protrusions or recesses. Bottom surface 302 may include one or more standoffs (e.g., bumps, texture or other protrusions) that provide for a slight gap between bottom surface 302 and deck surface 120. Bottom surface 302 may include one or more recesses (e.g., cuts, grooves, channels, or other recesses) that provide for paths between bottom surface 302 and deck surface 120. Where water or other debris penetrates roofing surface 107, a slight gap and/or recess, may facilitate the flow of the water or other debris between deck surface 120 and bottom surface 302 such that the water or debris can be cleared from underneath tile 110. In some embodiments, the slight air gap may facilitate the passage of at least some air between deck surface 120 and bottom surface 302, e.g., to facilitate the drying of moisture underneath tile 108 and/or dispersal of heat.

Top surface 304 may define a top-side of terminating tile 110 that is exposed to the environment when terminating tile 110 is disposed on roofing deck 104 during use (see at least FIG. 2B). For example, terminating tile 110 may be disposed on deck surface 120 such that top surface 304 is directly exposed to sun, rain, wind and other environmental conditions. In some embodiments, top surface 304 includes a substantially flat surface. In some embodiments, top surface 304 may include a texture or other surface features. Top surface 304 may extend from an upper end 306 to a lower end 308 of tile 110.

In some embodiments, top surface 304 is angled with respect to bottom surface 302. For example, in the illustrated embodiments, top surface 304 angles away from bottom surface 302 from upper end portion 110b to lower end portion 110a. In some embodiments, upper surface and lower surface are separated by an angle 310 of about 0.5° to about 3°. For example, angle 310 may be about 2°. An angle may be selected to provide for a tile of a sufficient length with out a relatively large thickness, thereby providing for an increased coverage/surface area without substantially increasing the weight of tile 110 and, thus, without substantially increasing the weight of roofing surface 107.

In some embodiments, lower end portion 110a of terminating tile 110 may include a lip 316. Lip 316 may include a protrusion extending downward from a lower end 308 of tile 110. Lip 316 may extend over a lower edge/lip 112 of roofing support surface/deck 104 when installed (see at least FIGS. 1-2B). Lip 316 may shield lower edge/lip 112 of roofing support surface/deck 104 from the environment and/or may encourage the flow of water and other debris over and away from lower edge/lip 112 of roofing support surface/deck 104. Lip 316 may also improve the aesthetic appearance of the end of the roofing surface 107.

In some embodiments, lip 316 includes a protrusion extending downward from bottom surface 302 at lower end 308 of terminating tile 110. In some embodiments, lip 316 includes a laterally extending protrusion that extends completely across a width of terminating tile 110 (e.g., from a right to a left side of terminating tile 110) (see at least FIGS. 4B and 4E. In some embodiments a length 320 of lip 316 is defined by a rear wall 322. Length 320 may be less than about 10% of a length of body 302. In some embodiments an exterior height 324 and/or interior height 325 of lip 316 is defined by a bottom edge/surface 326.

In some embodiments, upper end portion 110b of terminating tile 110 is shaped substantially complementary to recess 216 is shaped. For example, end wall 222 of recess 216 may have a height 230 that is the same or substantially the same as (e.g., slightly larger than) a height 332 of upper end 306 of tile 110, an angle 310 may be the same or substantially the same as angle 234 and/or 210 such that top surface 304 of tile 110 may be substantially parallel to top wall 226 of recess 216, and/or height 236 of a lower end of recess 216 may be about the same as a thickness of body 302 at about a distance 220 from upper end 306.

In some embodiments, terminating tile 108 includes one or more fastener holes 340 extending there through. For example, in the illustrated embodiment, body 302 includes two fastener holes 340 disposed in upper end portion 110b of terminating tile 110. Fastener holes 340 may provide for the installation of mechanical fasteners (e.g., screws, nails or the like) 241 to secure tile 110 to roof deck 104. In some embodiments, fastener holes 340 may be located in a portion of body 302 such that they are covered by an overlapping member of an adjacent tile 102 when an upper end portion 110b of tile 110 is disposed within a complementary recess of the adjacent tile. For example, fastener holes 340 may be located at distance 342 from upper end 306 of tile 110. Distance 342 may be less than length 220 of recess 216 such that a portion of a tile 102 located immediately above tile 110 (e.g., an overlapping member 228 of a stacking tile 108 located in a row above tile 110) covers fastener holes 340 (see at least FIGS. 2A-2B). In some embodiments, distance 342 may be about one-half of length 220 of recess 216. Covering of fastener holes 340 may shield the holes and fasteners from the environment to reduce the likelihood of water or other debris penetrating roofing surface 107 via holes 340. In some embodiments, no fastener holes may be provided. In some embodiments, only a single fastener hole 340 may be provided. For example, only one of depicted fastener holes 340 may be provided. In some embodiments, three or more fastener holes 340 may be provided. In some embodiments, fastener holes 340 may be placed at similar locations on both of stacking tiles 108 and terminating tiles 110.

In some embodiments, terminating tile 110 may include a substantially rectangular shape having a length 350 and a width 352. In some embodiments, length 350 may be about 15 inches (in), width 352 may be about 8 in, angle 310 may be about 2°, height 332 at upper end 306 may be ¼ in, height 324 at lower end 308 may be about tin, height 325 may be about ¼ in, length 320 may be about ¾ in, and fastener holes 340 may be a distance 342 of about 1¾ in (e.g., 1.75 in) from upper end 306.

While the tiles are depicted herein as having sharp, squared off corners and edges, it should be understood that the corners and/or the edges may be rounded. Additionally the corners may be “dog-eared.” Rounded or dog-eared edges and corners may inhibit breakage and cracking at or near the corners or edges.

In some embodiments, tiles 102 may be formed of a lightweight composite. For example, tiles 102 may be formed of concrete. In some embodiments, tiles 102 may be wet cast or otherwise formed of a lightweight concrete. In other embodiments, tiles may be formed from a mixture of cement, water and one or more of: pozzolan (e.g., volcanic ash, fly ash, silica fume, high-reactivity metakaolin, and ground granulated blast furnace slag, aggregates (e.g., lightweight aggregates), fillers, and air entrainment agents. If pozzolan is used, one or more different pozzolans may be used to form the tiles. In tiles formed using a pozzolan, the content of cementitious material in the tiles may be greater than about 20% pozzolan, greater than about 25% pozzolan, greater than about 35% pozzolan, greater than about 50% pozzolan, and up to 100% pozzolan.

FIG. 5 is a flow chart illustrating a method 500 of installing roofing system 100 in accordance with embodiments of the present technique. Method 500 may include installing terminating tiles 110, as depicted at block 502. For example, terminating tiles 110 may be disposed onto a lower portion/edge of roof deck surface 120 such that lip 316 of terminating tiles 110 overhangs lower edge/lip 112 of roofing support surface/deck 104.

In some embodiments, installing terminating tiles includes fastening tiles 110 to roof deck 104. For example, tiles 110 may be secured to roof deck 104 using a fastener (e.g., screw and/or nail) disposed into some or all of fastener holes 340 and secured to roof deck 104, an adhesive (e.g., glue) and/or sealant between lower surface 202 and roof deck surface 120.

In some embodiments, a plurality of terminating tiles 110 may be disposed adjacent one another (e.g., side-by-side) to create a row of terminating tiles. For example, a first row 106a of terminating tiles 110 may be disposed as depicted in at least FIG. 1.

An advantage of using the tiles described herein, is that the tiles may be self aligning. For example, recess 216 receives an upper end portion of another stacking tile, such that the upper end portion is restricted in movement. This allows “self-alignment” of the tiles to be readily achieved when installing the tiles. Self-alignment of the tiles contributes to the use of less material and labor during a construction project, thus reducing the overall environmental impact of a construction project.

Method 500 may include installing stacking tiles 108, as depicted at block 504. For example, stacking tiles 108 may be disposed onto a portion of roof deck surface 120 just above a preceding/lower row 106 of terminating tiles 110 such that an upper end portion 106b of the preceding row of tiles is overlapped by a lower end portion 108a of stacking tiles 108. For example, stacking tile 108 may be disposed such that upper end portion 106b of terminating tile 106b is disposed in recess 216 of stacking tile 108 and is overlapped by overlapping member 228 of stacking tile 108.

In some embodiments, installing stacking tiles includes fastening tiles 108 to roof deck 104. For example, tiles 108 may be secured to roof deck 104 using a fastener (e.g., screw and/or nail) disposed into some or all of fastener holes 240 and secured to roof deck 104, an adhesive (e.g., glue) and/or sealant between lower surface 202 and roof deck surface 120. In some embodiments, an adhesive and/or sealant may be disposed between overhanging member 228 and top surfaces of tiles 102 overlapped thereby.

In some embodiments, a plurality of stacking tiles 108 may be disposed adjacent one another (e.g., side-by-side) to create a row of stacking tiles 108. In some embodiments the tiles 108 may have interlocking edges. For example, a row 106b of stacking tiles 108 may be disposed immediately above row 106a of terminating tiles 110, as depicted in at least FIG. 1. Additional rows of stacking tiles 108 may be disposed above one another to form roofing surface 107 including multiple rows of stacking tiles (e.g., rows 106a and 106b), as depicted in at least FIG. 1. For example, stacking tiles 108 may be disposed such that upper end portion 108b of stacking tile 108a in a row immediately below the stacking tile is disposed in recess 216 of the stacking tile and is overlapped by overlapping member 228 of the stacking tile. An uppermost row of stacking tiles may be overlapped by a cap-tile and/or a flashing as described above.

It will be appreciated that method 500 is an exemplary embodiment of a method employed in accordance with techniques described herein. Method 500 may be may be modified to facilitate variations of its implementations and uses. The order of method 500 may be changed, and various elements may be added, reordered, combined, omitted, modified, etc.

Further modifications and alternative embodiments of various aspects of the invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art in view of this description. Accordingly, this description is to be construed as illustrative only and is for the purpose of teaching those skilled in the art the general manner of carrying out the invention. It is to be understood that the forms of the invention shown and described herein are to be taken as examples of embodiments. Elements and materials may be substituted for those illustrated and described herein, parts and processes may be reversed or omitted, and certain features of the invention may be utilized independently, all as would be apparent to one skilled in the art after having the benefit of this description of the invention. Changes may be made in the elements described herein without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as described in the following claims. Furthermore, note that the word “may” is used throughout this application in a permissive sense (i.e., having the potential to, being able to), not a mandatory sense (i.e., must). The term “include”, and derivations thereof, mean “including, but not limited to”. As used throughout this application, the singular forms “a”, “an” and “the” include plural referents unless the content clearly indicates otherwise. Thus, for example, reference to “a member” includes a combination of two or more members. The term “coupled” means “directly or indirectly connected”.



Download full PDF for full patent description/claims.

Advertise on FreshPatents.com - Rates & Info


You can also Monitor Keywords and Search for tracking patents relating to this Roofing tile system and method patent application.
###
monitor keywords

Keyword Monitor How KEYWORD MONITOR works... a FREE service from FreshPatents
1. Sign up (takes 30 seconds). 2. Fill in the keywords to be monitored.
3. Each week you receive an email with patent applications related to your keywords.  
Start now! - Receive info on patent apps like Roofing tile system and method or other areas of interest.
###


Previous Patent Application:
Accessible concealed suspended ceiling system
Next Patent Application:
Dlo molding with dutch bend feature and clip retention feature
Industry Class:
Synthetic resins or natural rubbers -- part of the class 520 series
Thank you for viewing the Roofing tile system and method patent info.
- - - Apple patents, Boeing patents, Google patents, IBM patents, Jabil patents, Coca Cola patents, Motorola patents

Results in 0.61854 seconds


Other interesting Freshpatents.com categories:
QUALCOMM , Monsanto , Yahoo , Corning ,

###

Data source: patent applications published in the public domain by the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). Information published here is for research/educational purposes only. FreshPatents is not affiliated with the USPTO, assignee companies, inventors, law firms or other assignees. Patent applications, documents and images may contain trademarks of the respective companies/authors. FreshPatents is not responsible for the accuracy, validity or otherwise contents of these public document patent application filings. When possible a complete PDF is provided, however, in some cases the presented document/images is an abstract or sampling of the full patent application for display purposes. FreshPatents.com Terms/Support
-g2--0.7289
Key IP Translations - Patent Translations

     SHARE
  
           

stats Patent Info
Application #
US 20130031864 A1
Publish Date
02/07/2013
Document #
13198525
File Date
08/04/2011
USPTO Class
52519
Other USPTO Classes
52560, 527481
International Class
/
Drawings
7


Your Message Here(14K)



Follow us on Twitter
twitter icon@FreshPatents