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Touch gesture for detailed display

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20130007660 patent thumbnailZoom

Touch gesture for detailed display


In general, the present disclosure is directed to techniques for displaying, e.g., events of multiple calendars or annotations in a word processor in a single view. In one example, a method includes, providing a first calendar and a second calendar, wherein the first calendar includes a first group of calendar events at least some of which have corresponding textual event details, and wherein the second calendar includes a second group of calendar events at least some of which have corresponding textual event details; receiving a user input to select one of the first calendar or the second calendar; displaying the one or more corresponding textual event details of the first group of calendar events for the first calendar; and displaying visual representations of the second group of calendar events for the second calendar without displaying the corresponding textual event details.
Related Terms: Annotation Word Processor Annotations Calendars User Input

Inventors: German Wolfgang Bauer, Michael K. Chan
USPTO Applicaton #: #20130007660 - Class: 715810 (USPTO) - 01/03/13 - Class 715 
Data Processing: Presentation Processing Of Document, Operator Interface Processing, And Screen Saver Display Processing > Operator Interface (e.g., Graphical User Interface) >On-screen Workspace Or Object >Menu Or Selectable Iconic Array (e.g., Palette)



Inventors:

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The Patent Description & Claims data below is from USPTO Patent Application 20130007660, Touch gesture for detailed display.

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CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application is a continuation of U.S. application Ser. No. 13/250,845, filed Sep. 30, 2011 which is a continuation of U.S. application Ser. No. 13/020,570, filed Feb. 3, 2011, the entire contents of which are incorporated herein by reference.

TECHNICAL FIELD

This disclosure relates to graphical user interfaces.

BACKGROUND

A user may interact with applications executing on a computing device (e.g., mobile phone, tablet computer, smart phone, or the like). For instance, a user may install, view, or delete an application on a computing device.

In some instances, a user may interact with a calendar application executing on a computing device. A user may view a time, day, or event in a calendar application. A user may also change events in a calendar application. A user may, in some instances, interact with a calendar application on a computing device using buttons or a touch-screen.

SUMMARY

In one example, a method includes, providing a first calendar and a second calendar during execution of a module on a computing device, wherein the first calendar includes a first group of calendar events at least some of which have one or more corresponding textual event details, and wherein the second calendar includes a second group of calendar events at least some of which have one or more corresponding textual event details; receiving a user input to select one of the first calendar or the second calendar; upon receiving the user input, displaying the one or more corresponding textual event details of the first group of calendar events for the first calendar; and upon receiving the user input, displaying visual representations of the second group of calendar events for the second calendar without displaying the one or more corresponding textual event details of the second group of calendar events.

In one example, a computer-readable storage medium is encoded with instructions that when executed cause one or more processors of a computing device to perform operations including: providing a first calendar and a second calendar during execution of a module, wherein the first calendar includes a first group of calendar events at least some of which have one or more corresponding textual event details, and wherein the second calendar includes a second group of calendar events at least some of which have one or more corresponding textual event details; receiving a user input to select one of the first calendar or the second calendar; upon receiving the user input, displaying the one or more corresponding textual event details of the first group of calendar events for the first calendar; and upon receiving the user input, displaying visual representations of the second group of calendar events for the second calendar without displaying the one or more corresponding textual event details of the second group of calendar events.

In one example, a computing device includes one or more processors; an output device; a calendar application installed on the computing device and operable by the one or more processors to display at the output device a first calendar and a second calendar during execution of the calendar application, wherein the first calendar includes a first group of calendar events at least some of which have one or more corresponding textual event details, and wherein the second calendar includes a second group of calendar events at least some of which have one or more corresponding textual event details; an input device to receive a user input to select one of the first calendar or the second calendar; and means for displaying the one or more corresponding textual event details of the first group of calendar events for the first calendar and visual representations of the second group of calendar events for the second calendar without displaying the one or more corresponding textual event details of the second group of calendar events.

In one example, a method includes providing a first annotation group and a second annotation group during execution of a module on a computing device, wherein the first annotation group includes annotations at least some of which have one or more corresponding textual annotation details, and wherein the second annotation group includes annotations at least some of which have one or more corresponding textual annotation details; receiving a user input to select one of the first annotation group or the second annotation group; upon receiving the user input, displaying the one or more corresponding textual annotation details of the annotations for the first annotation group; and upon receiving the user input, displaying visual representations of the annotations for the second annotation group without displaying the one or more corresponding textual annotation details of the annotations of the second annotation group.

In one example, a computer-readable storage medium is encoded with instructions that when executed cause one or more processors of a computing device to perform operations including: providing a first annotation group and a second annotation group during execution of a module, wherein the first annotation group includes annotations at least some of which have one or more corresponding textual annotation details, and wherein the second annotation group includes annotations at least some of which have one or more corresponding textual annotation details; receiving a user input to select one of the first annotation group or the second annotation group; upon receiving the user input, displaying the one or more corresponding textual annotation details of the annotations for the first annotation group; and upon receiving the user input, displaying visual representations of the annotations for the second annotation group without displaying the one or more corresponding textual annotation details of the annotations of the second annotation group.

In one example, a computing device includes: one or more processors; an output device; an application installed on the computing device and operable by the one or more processors to display at the output device a first annotation group and a second annotation group during execution of the application, wherein the first annotation group includes a first group of annotations at least some of which have one or more corresponding textual annotation details, and wherein the second annotation group includes a second group of annotations at least some of which have one or more corresponding textual annotation details; an input device to receive a user input to select one of the first annotation group or the second annotation group; and means for displaying the one or more corresponding textual annotation details of the first group of annotations for the first annotation group and visual representations of the second group of annotations for the second annotation group without displaying the one or more corresponding textual annotation details of the second group of annotations.

In one example, a method includes: displaying a first group of objects and a second group of objects; displaying first corresponding information of at least one of the first group of objects; displaying second corresponding information of at least one of the second group of objects; receiving, by a computing device, user input to select one of the first group of objects or the second group of objects; upon receiving the user input, displaying a quantity of the first corresponding information of the at least one of the first group of objects; upon receiving the user input, displaying a quantity of the second corresponding information of the at least one of the second group of objects, wherein the first quantity is not equal to the second quantity.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a block diagram illustrating an example of a computing device that may be configured to execute one or more applications, including a calendar application, and receive a user input, in accordance with one or more aspects of the present disclosure.

FIG. 2 is a block diagram illustrating further details of one example of the computing device shown in FIG. 1, in accordance with one or more aspects of the present disclosure.

FIG. 3 is a flow diagram illustrating an example method that may be performed by a computing device to display textual event details of calendar events and visual representations of calendar events, in accordance with one or more aspects of the present disclosure.

FIG. 4 is a block diagram illustrating an example of a calendar view initially configured to display textual event details of each calendar event for each calendar, and after receiving one or more user inputs, displaying visual representations of calendar events for one or more calendars, in accordance with one or more aspects of the present disclosure.

FIG. 5 is a block diagram illustrating an example of a calendar application displaying textual event details for a single calendar event, in accordance with one or more aspects of the present disclosure.

FIG. 6 is a block diagram illustrating an example of a calendar application displaying calendar events in a day calendar view, in accordance with one or more aspects of the present disclosure.

FIG. 7 is a block diagram illustrating an example of a word processor that displays annotations, in accordance with one or more aspects of the present disclosure.

FIG. 8 is a flow diagram illustrating an example method that may be performed by a computing device to display textual annotation details of one or more annotations and visual representations of annotations.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

In general, the present disclosure is directed to techniques for intelligently displaying, e.g., events of multiple calendars or annotations in a word processor in a single view of an application. In one example, a calendar application may allow a user to display multiple calendars in a single calendar view via a touch-sensitive screen. For example, a calendar application may allow a user to display a work calendar and a personal calendar in the same calendar view. Each calendar may include associated calendar events, e.g., meetings and appointments. The events of each calendar may be identified by a visual characteristic, e.g., color or visual pattern. For example, events of a personal calendar may be colored green, while events of a work calendar may be colored red. Increasing the number of calendars displayed in a single calendar view may increase the number of calendar events displayed. If many calendars are displayed in a single calendar view, the number of calendar events displayed may create unacceptable levels of visual congestion and/or increase the level of effort required by the user to identify particular events of interest.

In another example, a word processing application may display word processing content that a user may edit. In some examples, a word processing application may automatically associate annotations with word processing content when changes are made. In other examples, users may enter annotations manually to comment on word processing content. If many annotations are displayed in a single view, the number of annotations displayed may create unacceptable levels of visual congestion and/or increase the level of effort required by the user to identify a particular annotation.

In certain aspects of the disclosure, a calendar application may cause, e.g., two or more calendars to be displayed in a calendar view. Each calendar may include calendar events (e.g., meetings or appointments). Furthermore, each calendar event may include textual event details about the event, e.g., date, time, location, invitees, etc. The calendar application may display textual event details of calendar events for each calendar in the calendar view via an output device such as a touch-sensitive screen. In some examples, a user may determine that an unacceptable level of visual congestion exists when viewing all details of all calendar events. In such examples, the user may instruct the calendar application to “collapse” calendar events for calendars where full details are unnecessary. Collapsing a calendar event may include displaying a calendar event as a visual representation of a calendar event without textual event details. In other examples, collapsing a calendar event may include displaying only a limited set of event details for calendar events. In one example, calendar events for a particular calendar may be identified by a color code. A colored, vertical bar in a calendar view spanning the hours of 8:00 AM-10:00 AM may therefore indicate a calendar event of a particular calendar. In some examples, a user may collapse calendar events of multiple calendars. In this way, the calendar application may enable the user to display calendar event details for some calendars via an output device, while still providing condensed representations of calendar events for other calendars.

FIG. 1 is a block diagram illustrating an example of a computing device 2 that may be configured to execute one or more applications, including calendar application 6, and receive a user input, in accordance with one or more aspects of the present disclosure. Computing device 2 may, in some examples, include or be a part of a portable computing device (e.g. mobile phone/netbook/laptop/tablet device) or a desktop computer. Computing device 2 may also connect to a network including a wired or wireless network. In some examples, computing device 2 may include an output device 4. Output device 4 is described in further detail in FIG. 2 and may include a touch-sensitive screen, a cathode ray tube (CRT) monitor, liquid crystal display (LCD), or any other type of device that can generate intelligible output to a user.

Computing device 2 may execute a calendar application 6. Calendar application 6 may contain an event module 8 that performs various operations further described in FIG. 2. In some examples, calendar application 6 may display a calendar view 10 via output device 4. FIG. 1 illustrates an expanded view of calendar view 10 as displayed in output device 4. Calendar view 10 may cause one or more calendars A-C (shown in FIG. 1 as CAL. A, CAL. B, CAL. C) to be displayed in output device 4. In some examples, calendar application 6 may be described as displaying events. Those of skill in the art will understand that the calendar application 6 can cause events to be displayed via output device 4 using standard techniques.

A calendar may include a collection of calendar events associated with an entity. An entity may be, e.g., a person, a group of persons, organization, or a shared resource. In some examples, a shared resource may include a conference room or automobile. In the example of FIG. 1, calendar A may be associated with a person, e.g., a user of calendar application 6. Calendar A may further include a group of one or more associated calendar events, e.g., calendar event 14A, 14B, and 14C. Each calendar event associated with a particular calendar is identified by a unique visual property shared by the calendar and the calendar events. In the example of FIG. 1, a horizontal pattern identifies each calendar event, e.g., calendar event 14A, 14B, 14C, associated with calendar A. Other examples of unique visual properties include colors, shadings, patterns and shapes.

Calendar view 10 may display calendars A-C in one or more configurations of a Gregorian calendar. For example, calendar view 10 may display calendars A-C as: a day view (shown in FIG. 6) displaying a range of hours, e.g., 10:00 AM-4:00 PM; a week view displaying the seven days of the Gregorian calendar week; a work week view displaying the days of the Gregorian calendar week but not including Saturday and Sunday (shown in FIG. 1); a month view displaying a Gregorian calendar month; or a year view displaying a Gregorian calendar year.

A calendar displayed in calendar view 10 may include calendar events. A calendar event may represent an event or task that occurs at a particular date and time. Each calendar event may further include a collection of textual event details 16 to identify or describe each calendar event. For example, calendar event 14A may represent a meeting that a user will attend. Calendar event 14A may include multiple textual event details 16, e.g., event title, start time, end time, event duration, location, invitees, and event description. In one example, calendar event 14A may include textual event details 16 such as: Strategy Meeting (event title), 8:00 AM (start time), 9:30 AM (end time), 1.5 hours (duration), Conference Room A (location), Bob and Jill (invitees), and “Bring strategy binders and laptops. Breakfast will be served.” (event description). Displaying textual event details 16 may be advantageous to the user because relevant information is displayed to the user immediately in calendar view 10 without requiring additional user input.

Calendar application 6 may further include a control panel 22. Control panel 22 may include calendar identifiers 12A-C for each calendar displayed in calendar view 10. A calendar identifier may include a calendar name, a visual property 18 associated with each calendar event of the calendar, and an event details toggle 20. For example, calendar A is identified in control panel 22 by a calendar identifier 12A that includes the calendar title (“CAL. A”), visual property 18 (a horizontal pattern), and event details toggle 20 (currently selected). Control panel 22 may further include one or more configuration selectors 24 that provide administrative functionality for calendar application 6. Configuration selectors 24 may, for example, enable a user to add or remove calendars in calendar view 10.

Control panel 22 may include a calendar legend 19. Calendar legend 19 may display calendar view 10 in a broader time context. For example, as shown in FIG. 1, calendar legend 19 may display the month that includes the work week presently displayed in calendar view 10. Calendar legend 19 may also include a calendar view indicator 21 that represents the calendar view presently displayed by calendar application 6 via output device 4. Calendar view indicator 21 may enable the user to quickly identify calendar view 10, e.g., a work week, within a broader time context, e.g., a month.

Calendar legend 19 may further enable the user to change time/date range displayed in calendar view 10. For example, the user may provide a user input that selects, using calendar legend 19, a different work week to be displayed in calendar view 10. In response to the user input, calendar view 10 may display the work week selected by the user. In other examples, the user may use calendar legend 19 to change the time dimension of calendar view 10 from, e.g., a week to a month.

Calendar application 6 may display calendar events via output device 4 in a variety of configurations. For example, calendar application 6 may cause textual event details of each calendar event associated with a particular calendar to be displayed in output device 4. Alternatively, calendar application 6 may, for a particular calendar, display visual representations of each associated calendar event via output device 4 without textual event details. In FIG. 1, calendar events of calendars B and C, e.g., calendar events 15 and 17, are displayed by output device 4 as visual representations of calendar events without textual event details. A visual representation of a calendar event may include, e.g., a vertical bar with a length approximately equal to the duration of the calendar event. More generally, a visual representation of a calendar event may indicate to the user that an event is scheduled at a particular date and time. A visual representation of a calendar event may include a vertical bar, shading, or any other graphical indicator capable of displaying to a user that the presence of a calendar event.

In some examples, calendar application 6 may concurrently display, via output device 4, textual event details of calendar events for a first calendar while displaying calendar events as visual representations without textual event details for a second calendar. For example, in FIG. 1 calendar application 6 causes textual event details of calendar events for calendar A to be displayed in output device 4. Calendar application 6 concurrently displays calendar events of calendars B and C via output device 4 as visual representations without textual event details. Using the techniques of the present disclosure, a user may, according to his or her preferences, select which calendars will display textual event details of calendar events and which calendars will display calendar events as visual representations without textual event details.

In some examples, a user may increase the number of calendars displayed in calendar view 10 by output device 4. Increasing the number of calendars displayed may result in a corresponding increase in the number calendar events displayed in the calendar view. If a large number of calendar events are displayed and the textual event details of each calendar event are displayed, the user may experience an unacceptable level of visual congestion and/or increased difficulty identifying particular events of interest. Aspects of the present disclosure overcome these limitations.

In FIG. 1, a user may wish to view textual event details of calendar events for calendar A while viewing only visual representations of calendar events without textual event details for calendars B and C. Initially, calendar application 6 displays textual event details of each calendar event associated with calendars A-C via output device 4. When textual event details are displayed for a particular calendar, the event details toggle, e.g., event details toggle 20, may be set to a selected state. To change the display of calendar events for calendars B and C, the user may provide a user input. The user input may cause calendar application 6 to display visual representations of calendar events without textual event details for calendars B and C via output device 4. A user input may include a keystroke, touch gesture, or other input provided by the user and interpretable by computing device 2. Upon receiving a user input to display visual representations of calendar events without textual event details for calendars B and C, calendar application 6 may “collapse” calendar events of calendars B and C. Collapsing calendar events of a calendar may include displaying visual representations of calendar events without textual event details. When visual representations of calendar events without textual event details are displayed, the event details toggle, e.g., event details toggle 26, is set to an unselected state.

In one exemplary use case of FIG. 1, a user may initially add calendars A-C to calendar view 10 using configuration selector 24. Calendar A may be the user\'s work calendar, calendar B may be the user\'s personal calendar, and calendar C may be the personal calendar of the user\'s spouse. Initially, textual event details of each calendar event for each calendar may be displayed in the calendar view. The user may, however, determine that the level of visual congestion generated by the display of all textual event details for all calendar events is unacceptable. In the exemplary use case, the user may only require textual event details of calendar events for the work calendar, i.e., calendar A. The user may, however, still wish to display visual representations of calendar events for the user\'s personal calendar and the spouse\'s calendar, rather than removing the calendars entirely from the calendar view. To collapse calendar events of calendars B and C, the user may provide a user input that causes calendar application 6 to display via output device 4 visual representations of calendar events without textual event details for calendars B and C.

After calendars B and C have been collapsed, event details toggles 26 and 28 may be displayed as deselected. At a later time, the user may wish to view the textual event details of calendar events for calendar B. The user may provide a subsequent user input that causes calendar application 6 to display textual event details of calendar events via output device 4 for calendar B, i.e., calendar application 6 “expands” calendar events of calendar B.

Calendar application 6 may expand and collapse calendar events in response to various user inputs. In one example, output device 4 may be a touch-sensitive screen. To generate a user input, a user may perform a touch gesture on the area of output device 4 that displays an expanded calendar event, e.g., calendar event 14A. A touch gesture may include a single tap, double tap, long press or other touch gesture. The touch gesture generates a user input that causes calendar application 6 to collapse all calendar events associated calendar A. Similarly, a touch gesture performed on the area of output device 4 that displays a collapsed calendar event, e.g., calendar event 14B associated with calendar B, may cause calendar application 6 to expand all calendar events associated with calendar B.

In other examples, a user may perform a touch gesture on the area of output device 4 that displays an event details toggle to expand or collapse calendar events. For example, a user may perform a touch gesture on the area of output device 4 that displays event details toggle 20. Performing a touch gesture on event details toggle 20 may select event details toggle 20 and expand calendar events of calendar A. Performing a subsequent touch gesture on the area of output device 4 that displays event details toggle 20 may collapse events of calendar and deselect event details toggle 20. In other examples, a user may collapse and expand calendar events using a computer pointing device, such as a mouse. In such examples, user inputs are provided through a computer pointing device, such as a mouse, rather than through touch gestures.

Various aspects of the disclosure may provide, in certain instances, one or more benefits and advantages. For example, if a viewer determines that the number of calendar events generated for display by the calendar application creates an unacceptable level of visual congestion or increases the level of effort required to identify particular events of interest, the user may collapse calendar events when textual event details are unnecessary. By collapsing calendar events where textual event details are unnecessary, more textual event details may be shown for each remaining calendar event that is not collapsed.

Other various aspects of the disclosure may provide, in certain instances, one or more benefits and advantages. For example, collapsing one or more calendars may result in fewer textual event details displayed to a user, and therefore the user may exert less effort when searching for a particular calendar event. In some examples, selectively collapsing one group of calendar events while displaying textual event details of other groups of calendar events also provides the user with greater customization. This customization may be particularly beneficial because a user is not required to collapse all events for all calendars or display all textual event details for all calendar events. Thus, a user may benefit from viewing only relevant textual event details while retaining the ability to view visual representations of calendar events from other calendars. Collapsing rather than entirely removing a calendar may provide a further benefit when a user wishes to identify conflicts in a calendar view without display all details of all calendar events.

FIG. 2 is a block diagram illustrating further details of one example of computing device 2 shown in FIG. 1, in accordance with one or more aspects of the present disclosure. FIG. 2 illustrates only one particular example of computing device 2, and many other example embodiments of computing device 2 may be used in other instances.

As shown in the specific example of FIG. 2, computing device 2 includes one or more processors 30, memory 32, a network interface 34, one or more storage devices 36, input device 38, output device 4, and battery 42. Computing device 2 also includes an operating system 44, input event module 46, and output event module 48, which may include modules that are executable by computing device 2. Computing device 2 may further include one or more applications 50 and a calendar application 6. One or more applications 50 and calendar application 6 are also executable by computing device 2. Each of components 30, 32, 34, 36, 38, 4, 42, 44, 46, 48, 50, and 6 may be interconnected (physically, communicatively, and/or operatively) for inter-component communications.

Processors 30 may be configured to implement functionality and/or process instructions for execution within computing device 2. Processors 30 may be capable of processing instructions stored in memory 32 or instructions stored on storage devices 36.

Memory 32 may be configured to store information within computing device 2 during operation. Memory 32 may, in some examples, be described as a computer-readable storage medium. In some examples, memory 32 is a temporary memory, meaning that a primary purpose of memory 32 is not long-term storage. Memory 32 may also, in some examples, be described as a volatile memory, meaning that memory 32 does not maintain stored contents when the computer is turned off. Examples of volatile memories include random access memories (RAM), dynamic random access memories (DRAM), static random access memories (SRAM), and other forms of volatile memories known in the art. In some examples, memory 32 may be used to store program instructions for execution by processors 30. Memory 32 may be used by software or applications running on computing device 2 (e.g., one or more of applications 50) to temporarily store information during program execution.



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Key IP Translations - Patent Translations


stats Patent Info
Application #
US 20130007660 A1
Publish Date
01/03/2013
Document #
13610568
File Date
09/11/2012
USPTO Class
715810
Other USPTO Classes
International Class
06F3/048
Drawings
9


Annotation
Word Processor
Annotations
Calendars
User Input


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