FreshPatents.com Logo
stats FreshPatents Stats
n/a views for this patent on FreshPatents.com
Updated: December 09 2014
newTOP 200 Companies filing patents this week


Advertise Here
Promote your product, service and ideas.

    Free Services  

  • MONITOR KEYWORDS
  • Enter keywords & we'll notify you when a new patent matches your request (weekly update).

  • ORGANIZER
  • Save & organize patents so you can view them later.

  • RSS rss
  • Create custom RSS feeds. Track keywords without receiving email.

  • ARCHIVE
  • View the last few months of your Keyword emails.

  • COMPANY DIRECTORY
  • Patents sorted by company.

Your Message Here

Follow us on Twitter
twitter icon@FreshPatents

System and method for obtaining preferences with a user interface

last patentdownload pdfdownload imgimage previewnext patent

20120324367 patent thumbnailZoom

System and method for obtaining preferences with a user interface


Techniques for obtaining user preferences. The techniques include receiving user context information associated with at least one user; identifying, based at least in part on the received user context information, a plurality of attributes of items in a plurality of items; obtaining, using at least one processor, at least one first-order user preference based at least in part on a first input provided by the at least one user, wherein the plurality of first-order user preferences comprises a preference for a first attribute in the plurality of attributes; and obtaining, using the at least one processor, at least one second-order user preference based at least in part on a second input provided by the at least one user, wherein the at least one second-order user preference comprises a preference among attributes in the plurality of attributes.
Related Terms: First-order

Browse recent Primal Fusion Inc. patents - Waterloo, CA
Inventors: Ihab Francis Ilyas, Mohamed A. Soliman
USPTO Applicaton #: #20120324367 - Class: 715747 (USPTO) - 12/20/12 - Class 715 
Data Processing: Presentation Processing Of Document, Operator Interface Processing, And Screen Saver Display Processing > Operator Interface (e.g., Graphical User Interface) >For Plural Users Or Sites (e.g., Network) >Interface Customization Or Adaption (e.g., Client Server) >End User Based (e.g., Preference Setting)



view organizer monitor keywords


The Patent Description & Claims data below is from USPTO Patent Application 20120324367, System and method for obtaining preferences with a user interface.

last patentpdficondownload pdfimage previewnext patent

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

The present application claims the benefit under 35 U.S.C. §119(e) of U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 61/498,899, filed on Jun. 20, 2011, titled “Method and Apparatus for Preference Guided Data Exploration.” The present application also claims the benefit under 35 U.S.C. §365(c) and §120 and is a continuation-in-part of PCT international application PCT/CA2012/000009, filed Jan. 6, 2012, and titled “Systems and Methods for Analyzing and Synthesizing Complex Knowledge Representations.”

PCT international application PCT/CA2012/000009 is a continuation of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/345,637, filed on Jan. 6, 2012, and titled “Knowledge Representation Systems and Methods Incorporating Data Consumer Models and Preferences,” which claims the benefit under 35 U.S.C. §119(e) of U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 61/498,899, filed on Jun. 20, 2011, titled “Method and Apparatus for Preference Guided Data Exploration.”

PCT international application PCT/CA2012/000009 is also a continuation of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/345,640, filed on Jan. 6, 2012, and titled “Systems and Methods for Applying Statistical Inference Techniques to Knowledge Representations,” which is a continuation in part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/165,423, filed Jun. 21, 2011, titled “Systems and Methods for Analyzing and Synthesizing Complex Knowledge Representations.”

PCT international application PCT/CA2012/000009 is also a continuation of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/345,644, filed on Jan. 6, 2012, and titled “Knowledge Representation Systems and Methods Incorporating Inference Rules,” which is a continuation in part of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 13/165,423, filed Jun. 21, 2011, titled “Systems and Methods for Analyzing and Synthesizing Complex Knowledge Representations.”

Each of the above-identified applications is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety.

BACKGROUND

Information retrieval systems are capable of accessing enormous volumes of information. As a result, locating information of interest to users presents challenges. One such challenge is identifying information that may be of interest to users so that information may be presented to them without overwhelming users with irrelevant information. Even in environments, such as online search, where the user provides an explicit indication (e.g., a search query) of what information the user may be interested in, such an indication may not be sufficient to accurately identify the content which is appropriate to present to the user from among all the content that may be available to be presented to the user.

Conventional approaches to identifying information of interest to a user often shift the burden of finding such information to the user. For example, conventional approaches to search may involve presenting all potentially relevant results to a user in response to the user's search query. Subsequently, the user has to manually explore and/or rank these results in order to find the information of greatest interest to him. When the number of potentially relevant results is large, which is often the case, the user may be overwhelmed and may fail to locate the information he is seeking.

One technique for addressing this problem is to integrate a user's preferences into the process of identifying information of interest to the user. By presenting information to the user in accordance with his preferences, the user may be helped to find the information he is seeking. However, conventional approaches to specifying user preferences severely limit the ways in which user preferences may be specified, thereby limiting the utility of such approaches.

Consider, for example, a data exploration model adopted by many search services and illustrated in FIG. 1. Query interface 12 is used to collect query predicates in the form of keywords and/or attribute values (e.g., “used Toyota” with price in the range [$2000-$5000]). Query results are then sorted (14) on the values of one or more attributes (e.g., order by Price then by Rating) in a major sort/minor sort fashion. The user then scans (16) through the sorted query answers to locate items of interest, refines query predicates, and repeats the exploration cycle (18). This “Query, Sort, then Scan” model limits the flexibility of preference specification and imposes rigid information retrieval schemes, as highlighted in the following example.

Example 1

Amy is searching online catalogs for a camera to buy. Amy is looking for a reasonably priced camera, whose color is preferably silver and less preferably black or gray, and whose reviews contain the keywords “High Quality.” Amy is a money saver, so her primary concern is satisfying her Price preferences, followed by her Color and Reviews preferences.

The data exploration model of FIG. 1 allows Amy to sort results in ascending price order. Amy then needs to scan through the results, which are sorted by price, comparing colors and inspecting reviews to find the camera that she wants. The path followed by Amy to explore search results is mainly dictated by her price preference, while other preferences are incorporated in the exploration task through Amy's effort, which can limit the possibility of finding items that closely match her requirements.

Conventional approaches to specifying user preferences suffer from a number of other drawbacks in addition to not simultaneously supporting preferences for multiple attributes (e.g., price, color, and reviews). For example, preference specifications may be inconsistent with one another. A typical example is having cycles (or “circularity”) in preferences among first-order preferences (preferences among attributes of items such as preferring one car to another car based on the price or on brand). For instance, a user may indicate that a Honda is preferred to a Toyota, a Toyota is preferred to a Nissan, and a Nissan is preferred to a Honda. Even when first-order preferences are consistent, preferences among first-order preferences, termed second-order preferences (e.g., brand preferences are more important than price preferences) may result in further inconsistencies among specified preferences. Conventional information retrieval systems are unable to rank search results when preference specifications may be inconsistent.

SUMMARY

In some embodiments, a computer-implemented method for calculating a ranking of at least one item in a plurality of items is disclosed. The method comprises receiving user preferences comprising a plurality of first-order user preferences indicative of a user's preferences for items in the plurality of items, and at least one second-order user preference indicative of the user's preferences among first-order user preferences in the plurality of first-order user preferences. The method further comprises calculating, with at least one processor, a ranking of the at least one item in the plurality of items based, at least in part on, at least one data structure encoding a preference graph that represents the received user preferences, and identifying and outputting at least a subset of the plurality of items to a user, in accordance with the ranking.

In some embodiments, a system is disclosed. The system comprises at least one memory configured to store a plurality of tuples, each tuple in the plurality of tuples corresponding to an item in a plurality of items, and at least one data structure encoding a preference graph to represent user preferences, wherein the user preferences comprise a plurality of first-order user preferences indicative of a user's preferences among items in the plurality of items, and at least one second-order user preference indicative of the user's preferences among first-order user preferences in the plurality of first-order user preferences. The system further comprises at least one processor coupled to the at least one memory, the at least one processor configured to calculate a ranking of at least one item in the plurality of items based, at least in part on, the at least one data structure encoding the preference graph that represents the user preferences, and identify and output at least a subset of the plurality of items to a user, in accordance with the ranking.

In some embodiments, at least one computer-readable storage medium article is disclosed. The at least one computer-readable storage medium article stores a plurality of processor-executable instructions that, when executed by at least one processor, cause the at least one processor to perform a method of calculating a ranking for at least one item in a plurality of items. The method comprises receiving user preferences comprising a plurality of first-order user preferences indicative of a user's preferences among items in the plurality of items, and at least one second-order user preference indicative of the user's preferences among first-order user preferences in the plurality of first-order user preferences. The method further comprises calculating a ranking of the at least one item in the plurality of items based, at least in part on, at least one data structure encoding a preference graph that represents the received user preferences, and identifying and outputting at least a subset of the plurality of items to a user, in accordance with the ranking.

In some embodiments, a computer-implemented method for constructing at least one data structure encoding a preference graph that represents user preferences is disclosed. The preference graph comprises a first node for a first item in a plurality of items, a second node for a second item in the plurality of items, and an edge between the first node and the second node. The method comprises receiving a plurality of first-order user preferences indicative of user preferences among values of attributes of items in the plurality of items, receiving at least one second-order user preference indicative of user preferences among the attributes of items in the plurality of items, and computing, using at least one processor, a weight for the edge between the first node and the second node based at least in part on the plurality of first-order user preferences and the at least one second-order user preference, wherein the weight is indicative of a degree of preference for the first item over the second item.

In some embodiments, a system for constructing at least one data structure encoding a preference graph that represents user preferences is disclosed. The preference graph comprising a first node for a first item in a plurality of items, a second node for a second item in the plurality of items, and an edge between the first node and the second node. The system comprises at least on processor configured to receive a plurality of first-order user preferences indicative of user preferences among values of attributes of items in the plurality of items, receive at least one second-order user preference indicative of user preferences among the attributes of items in the plurality of items, and compute a weight for the edge between the first node and the second node based at least in part on the plurality of first-order user preferences and the at least one second-order user preference, wherein the weight is indicative of a degree of preference for the first item over the second item.

In some embodiments, at least one computer-readable storage medium article is disclosed. The at least one computer-readable storage medium article stores a plurality of processor-executable instructions that, when executed by at least one processor, cause the at least one processor to perform a method for constructing at least one data structure encoding a preference graph that represents user preferences. The preference graph comprises a first node for a first item in a plurality of items, a second node for a second item in the plurality of items, and an edge between the first node and the second node. The method comprises receiving a plurality of first-order user preferences indicative of user preferences among values of attributes of items in the plurality of items, receiving at least one second-order user preference indicative of user preferences among the attributes of items in the plurality of items, and computing a weight for the edge between the first node and the second node based at least in part on the plurality of first-order user preferences and the at least one second-order user preference, wherein the weight is indicative of a degree of preference for the first item over the second item.

In some embodiments, a computer-implemented method for obtaining user preferences is disclosed. The method comprises receiving user context information associated with at least one user; identifying, based at least in part on the received user context information, a plurality of attributes of items in a plurality of item; obtaining, using at least one processor, at least one first-order user preference based at least in part on a first input provided by the at least one user, wherein the plurality of first-order user preferences comprises a preference for a first attribute in the plurality of attributes; and obtaining, using the at least one processor, at least one second-order user preference based at least in part on a second input provided by the at least one user, wherein the at least one second-order user preference comprises a preference among attributes in the plurality of attributes.

In some embodiments, a system for obtaining user preferences is disclosed. The system comprises at least one processor configured to receive user context information associated with at least one user; identify, based at least in part on the received user context information, a plurality of attributes of items in a plurality of items; obtain, at least one first-order user preference based at least in part on a first input provided by the at least one user, wherein the plurality of first-order user preferences comprises a preference for a first attribute in the plurality of attributes; and obtain at least one second-order user preference based at least in part on a second input provided by the at least one user, wherein the at least one second-order user preference comprises a preference among attributes in the plurality of attributes.

In some embodiments, at least one computer-readable storage medium article is disclosed. The at least one computer-readable storage medium article stores a plurality of processor-executable instructions that, when executed by at least one processor, cause the at least one processor to perform a method for obtaining user preferences. The method comprises receiving user context information associated with at least one user; identifying, based at least in part on the received user context information, a plurality of attributes of items in a plurality of items; obtaining, using at least one processor, at least one first-order user preference based at least in part on a first input provided by the at least one user, wherein the plurality of first-order user preferences comprises a preference for a first attribute in the plurality of attributes; and obtaining, using the at least one processor, at least one second-order user preference based at least in part on a second input provided by the at least one user, wherein the at least one second-order user preference comprises a preference among attributes in the plurality of attributes.

In some embodiments, a computer-implemented method for specifying user preferences in a semantic network encoded in at least one data structure is disclosed. The method comprises receiving, using at least one processor, a plurality of first-order user preferences for at least one concept in a semantic network, wherein the plurality of first-order user preferences are indicative of a user's preferences among children of attributes of the at least one concept in the semantic network; receiving, using the at least one processor, at least one second-order user preference for the at least one concept in the semantic network, wherein the at least one second-order user preference is indicative of the user's preferences among attributes of the at least one concept; and performing at least one semantic processing act by using the semantic network, the plurality of first-order user preferences, and the at least one second-order user preference.

In some embodiments, a system for specifying user preferences in a semantic network encoded in at least one data structure is disclosed. The system comprises at least one processor configured to receive a plurality of first-order user preferences for at least one concept in a semantic network, wherein the plurality of first-order user preferences are indicative of a user's preferences among children of attributes of the at least one concept in the semantic network; receive at least one second-order user preference for the at least one concept in the semantic network, wherein the at least one second-order user preference is indicative of the user's preferences among attributes of the at least one concept; and perform at least one semantic processing act by using the semantic network, the plurality of first-order user preferences, and the at least one second-order user preference.

In some embodiments, at least one computer-readable storage medium article is disclosed. The at least one computer-readable storage medium article stores a plurality of processor-executable instructions that, when executed by at least one processor, cause the at least one processor to perform a method for specifying user preferences in a semantic network encoded in at least one data structure. The method comprises receiving a plurality of first-order user preferences for at least one concept in a semantic network, wherein the plurality of first-order user preferences are indicative of a user's preferences among children of attributes of the at least one concept in the semantic network; receiving at least one second-order user preference for the at least one concept in the semantic network, wherein the at least one second-order user preference is indicative of the user's preferences among attributes of the at least one concept; and performing at least one semantic processing act by using the semantic network, the plurality of first-order user preferences, and the at least one second-order user preference.

The foregoing is a non-limiting summary of the invention, which is defined by the attached claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The accompanying drawings are not intended to be drawn to scale. In the drawings, each identical or nearly identical component that is illustrated in various figures is represented by a like numeral. For purposes of clarity, not every component may be labeled in every drawing. In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a diagram of a “query, sort, then scan” data exploration model, in accordance with prior art.

FIG. 2A is a diagram illustrating a relation, in accordance with some embodiments of the present invention.

FIG. 2B is a diagram illustrating a semantic network associated with a portion of the relation illustrated in FIG. 2A.

FIG. 3 is a flowchart of an illustrative preference modeling process, in accordance with some embodiments of the present invention.

FIG. 4 is a diagram illustrating scopes obtained from a relation, in accordance with some embodiments of the present invention.

FIG. 5 is a diagram illustrating scope comparators, in accordance with some embodiments of the present invention.

FIG. 6 is a diagram illustrating conjoint preferences, in accordance with some embodiments of the present invention.

FIG. 7 is a diagram of an illustrative mapping of a partial order to linear extensions, in accordance with some embodiments of the present invention.

FIG. 8 is a diagram of an illustrative preference graph, in accordance with some embodiments of the present invention.

FIG. 9 is a diagram of an illustrative computation of edge weights for different types of second-order preferences, in accordance with some embodiments of the present invention.

FIG. 10 is a diagram of an illustrative page-rank based matrix for prioritized comparators, in accordance with some embodiments of the present invention.

FIG. 11 is a diagram of an illustrative weighted preference graph and tournaments derived from it, in accordance with some embodiments of the present invention.

FIG. 12 is a flowchart for an illustrative process for interactively specifying user preferences, in accordance with some embodiments of the present invention.

FIG. 13 is a flowchart for an illustrative process for computing a ranking for one or more items based on user preferences, in accordance with some embodiments of the present invention.

FIG. 14 shows an illustrative example of a knowledge representation, in accordance with some embodiments of the present invention.

FIG. 15 is an illustrative computer system on which some embodiments of the present invention may be implemented.

FIG. 16 is a block diagram illustrating an exemplary system for implementing an atomic knowledge representation model in accordance with some embodiments of the present invention.

FIG. 17 is a block diagram illustrating another exemplary system for implementing an atomic knowledge representation model in accordance with some embodiments of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Inadequate incorporation of preferences in conventional information retrieval systems is due at least partly to the inability of these systems to integrate different types of preferences. For instance, in the above-described example, preferences include an ordering on all prices (a “total order” preference), an ordering between some, but not all, colors (a “partial order” preference), a Boolean predicate for the presence of the words “High Quality” in the reviews, and an indication that price is more important than the other preferences.

As well, it may be useful to specify different types of preferences when a user may have precise preferences for information in one domain (but not another domain—e.g., because the user may possess a large amount of knowledge about that one domain, but not another): Such precise preferences may be specified, for example, in the form of one or more scoring functions. The same user may have less precise preferences for information in another domain because the user may not possess the same degree of knowledge about the other domain. In this case, preferences may be specified, for example, in the form of one or more partial orders on attribute values. There are many instances in which the user may need to specify both types of preferences (i.e., using a scoring function and using a partial order), as shown in Example 2 below.

Example 2

Alice is searching for a car to buy. Alice has specific preferences regarding sports cars, and more relaxed preferences regarding SUVs. Alice supplies values scores to rank sports cars, and a set of partial orders encoding SUVs preferences. Alice expects reported results to be ranked according to her preferences.

A system capable of integrating different preference types and identifying information of interest to a user or users, in accordance with preferences specified by the user(s), may address some of the above-discussed drawbacks of conventional approaches to information retrieval. However, not every embodiment addresses every one of these drawbacks, and some embodiments may not address any of them. As such, it should be appreciated that embodiments of the invention are not limited to addressing all or any of the above-discussed drawbacks of these conventional approaches to information retrieval.

Accordingly, in some embodiments, a preference language is provided for specifying different types of user preferences among items. A system, implemented in accordance with some embodiments, may assist a user to specify preferences using the preference language. The specified preferences may be used by the system to identify information of interest to the user. To this end, in some embodiments, the specified preferences may be used to construct a preference model that, in turn, may be used to produce a ranking of one or more items in accordance with any user preferences.

Items may be any suitable objects or information (i.e., they may be tangible or intangible) about which a user may express preferences. In some embodiments, an item may be any product that may be manufactured, sold, and/or purchased. For example, an item may be a car or an airplane ticket and a user (e.g., a consumer) may have preferences for one car over another car and/or may prefer one airplane ticket to another airplane ticket. In some embodiments, an item may comprise information. Users may prefer one item to another item based at least in part on the information that these items contain. For example, items may include content (e.g., video content, audio content, one or more images, one or more webpages, text, etc.) and the user may prefer some content to other content. As another example, items may include metadata about content. As another example, a user may prefer to see a webpage that contains information related to cars over a webpage that contains information related to bicycles. A preference model may be used to identify information of interest to the user by ranking one or more of such items in accordance with any user preferences.

In some embodiments, where semantic processing techniques may be used to identify information of interest to a user or users, an item may be represented by one or more entities in a knowledge representation. Such a knowledge representation may be used by one or more semantic processing techniques to identify information of interest to the user(s). An item may be represented by an entity or entities in any suitable type of knowledge representation and, indeed, semantic processing techniques make use of a broad range of knowledge representations including, but not limited to, structured controlled vocabularies such as taxonomies, thesauri, and faceted classifications; formal specifications, such as semantic networks and ontologies; and unstructured forms, such as documents based in natural language.

While it is not intended that the claimed invention be limited to processing specific knowledge representations in accordance with user preferences, a preferred form is the type of formal specification referred to as a semantic network. Semantic networks are explained in many sources, noteworthy among them being U.S. Publication No. 2010/0235307, titled “Method, System, And Computer Program For User-Driven Dynamic Generation of Semantic Networks and Media Synthesis,” filed on, published on Sep. 16, 2010, which is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety.

In some embodiments, a semantic network may be represented as a data structure embodying (or representing) a directed graph comprising vertices or nodes that represent concepts, and edges that represent semantic relations between the concepts. The data structure embodying a semantic network may be encoded (i.e., instantiated) in one or more non-transitory, tangible computer-readable storage medium articles. As such, a semantic network may be said to comprise one or more concepts. Each such concept may be represented by a data structure storing any data associated with one or more nodes in the semantic network representing the concept. An edge in the directed graph (i.e., its encoded instantiation in the data structure) may represent any of different types of relationships between the concepts associated with the two nodes that the edge connects.

Accordingly, in embodiments where items may be represented by one or more entities in a knowledge representation, items may be represented, at least in part, by one or more concepts in a semantic network. For example, an item may be represented by a concept and one or more of its descendants. As a specific example, an item may be represented by a concept, children of the concept, and grandchildren of the concept. Though it should be appreciated that an item may be represented by any entity or entities in a semantic network as aspects of the present invention are not limited in this respect.

In embodiments where items may be represented by one or more entities in a knowledge representation (e.g., a semantic network), semantic processing techniques may be used to perform any suitable type of semantic processing in accordance with user preferences. As one non-limiting example, semantic processing techniques may be used to identify information of interest to a user at least in part by identifying concepts in the semantic network that are of interest to the user. To this end, user preferences may be used to construct a preference model that, in turn, may be used to produce a ranking of one or more concepts in accordance with any user preferences. As another non-limiting example, semantic processing techniques may be used to augment a semantic network by synthesizing one or more new concepts based at least in part on user preferences. Synthesis techniques may rely on preference information and/or a preference model, constructed in accordance with techniques described herein, when synthesizing one or more knowledge representations and/or presenting knowledge representations to a data consumer. To this end, the preference model may be used to produce a ranking of one or more concepts in a semantic network or the preference may be used for this purpose in any other suitable way.

Any of the above-described types of items may comprise, or have associated with it, one or more attributes. In some embodiments, an attribute of an item may be related to the item and may be a characteristic of the item. An attribute of an item may be a characteristic descriptive of the item. For example, if an item is an item that may be purchased (e.g., a car, a computer, etc.), an attribute of the item may be a price related to the item. As another example, if an item comprises information (e.g., a movie, music, etc.), an attribute of the item may be a genre of the content (e.g., horror movies, bluegrass music, etc.) or any other suitable characteristic of the content. In some instances, an attribute of an item may identify the item. For example, an attribute of an item may be an identifier (e.g., name, serial number, or model number) of the item.

In some embodiments, attributes may be numerical attributes or categorical attributes. Numerical attributes may comprise one or more values. For instance a numerical attribute may comprise a single number (e.g., 5) or a range of numbers (e.g., 1-1000). Categorical attributes may also comprise one or more values. For instance, a categorical value for the category “Color” may comprise a single color (e.g., “Red”) or a set of colors (e.g., {“Red”, “Green”}). Though, it should be recognized that attribute values are not limited to being numbers and/or categories and may be any of numerous other types of values. For instance, values may comprise alphabetic and alphanumeric strings. Though, it should be appreciated that, in some embodiments, attributes are not limited to being numerical attributes or categorical attributes as the case may be when an item is an element of a knowledge representation. In that case, an attribute of an item may be another element of the knowledge representation, as described below.

In some embodiments, where an item is represented at least in part by a concept in a semantic network (e.g., a concept and one or more of its descendants), an attribute of the item may be an attribute of the concept. In turn, an attribute of a concept in a semantic network may be any of numerous types of entities in the semantic network. An attribute of a concept may be an entity in the semantic network, which is indicative of one or more characteristics of the concept. Additionally or alternatively, attributes of a concept may correspond to other concepts in the semantic network and, for example, may correspond to children of the concept. For instance, as shown in FIG. 2B, the concepts “Make/Model,” “Color,” “Price,” and “Deposit” are attributes of the concept “Car” and the concepts “Red” “Blue” and “Black” are attributes of the concept “Color.” It should also be appreciated that in some embodiments, concepts in a semantic network may be defined in terms of compound levels of abstraction through their relationships to other entities and structurally in terms of other, more fundamental knowledge representation entities such as keywords and morphemes. In such embodiments, these more fundamental knowledge representation entities such as keywords, morphemes and other entities that comprise concepts may be attributes of the concept.

In some embodiments, an item may be represented by one or more tuples comprising information associated with the item. For example, a tuple may comprise values for one or more attributes associated with the item. In some cases, a tuple representing an item may comprise a value for each attribute associated with the item. In other cases, a tuple representing an item may comprise a value for only some of the attributes associated with the item. The values may be of any suitable type and may depend on the type(s) of attributes associated with the item.

FIG. 2A shows an illustrative example of a set of items, each item being represented by a tuple comprising values for the attributes of the item. In the illustrative example of FIG. 2A, each item is a car and is associated with six attributes: “ID,” “Make,” “Model,” “Color,” “Price,” and “Deposit.” Though in this example all items share the same attributes, this is not a limitation of aspects of the present invention as different items may have different attributes from one another and some attributes may have unknown values. In this illustrated example, each item is represented by a tuple (i.e., a set) of attribute values. Accordingly, the first item is represented by the first set of attribute values. For instance, the first item is represented by the tuple in the first row of the table shown in FIG. 2A. As illustrated, this first item is an $1600 Red Honda Civic identified by identifier “t1”. A deposit of $500 may be required to purchase this car.

As previously mentioned, aspects of the present invention are not limited to representing items using tuples and, in some embodiments, items may be represented using knowledge representations such as semantic networks. In some instances, items may be represented using tuples and/or semantic networks. For example, as shown in FIG. 2B, items represented using tuples in FIG. 2A may be represented by one or more entities in a semantic network. Each of the items shown in FIG. 2A is a car and the semantic network shown in FIG. 2B comprises a concept “car.” In FIG. 2B, the concept “car” is shown as having attributes “Make/Model,” “Color,” “Price,” and “Deposit” corresponding to some of the attributes of the items shown in FIG. 2A. In addition, values of attributes shown in FIG. 2A correspond to children of the attributes of the concept “car” in the semantic network of FIG. 2B. As such, in this illustrative example, the concept “car,” children of the concept “car,” and the grandchildren of the concept “car” collectively represent items shown as being represented by tuples in FIG. 2A. It should be appreciated that the illustrative semantic network shown in FIG. 2B corresponds only to a portion of the information shown in FIG. 2A; but this is for purposes of clarity only, as aspects of the present invention are not limited in this respect.

It should also be appreciated that, in some instances, a set of items may be represented alternatively using either a relation comprising one or more tuples or a knowledge representation such as a semantic network. FIGS. 2A and 2B provide one such example. However, in other instances, only one type of representation may be used. This may be done for any of numerous reasons. For example, it may be more computationally efficient to manipulate data structures associated with one representation than with another representation. Additionally or alternatively, it may be more convenient to represent a set of items using one representation over another.

A user may express preferences for one item over another item in a set of items. As discussed below, user preferences may be of any suitable type and may be first-order user preferences, second-order user preferences, and even further-order preferences.

In some embodiments, first-order preferences may be preferences expressed with respect to values of attributes of items. For example, a first-order preference may be a preference for an item over another item based on values of an attribute of the two items. For instance, a first-order preference may indicate that one item (e.g., a car) with a lower price (value of the attribute “price”) is preferred to another item (e.g., another car) with a higher price (a higher value of the attribute price). As another example, a first-order preference may indicate that an item (e.g., a car) that is red (value of the attribute “color”) is preferred to another item (e.g., another car) that is blue (a different value of the attribute “color”).

Another type of preference that may be specified is a second-order preference. In some embodiments, second-order preferences may indicate which attributes are more important to a user. As such, second-order preferences may indicate which first-order preferences are preferred by the user, if first-order preferences have been specified. For example, second-order preferences may indicate that the price of a car may be more important to a user than the color of the car. As such, if first-order preferences A were specified for values of the “price” attribute and first-order preferences B were specified for values of “color” attribute, the second-order preferences may indicate that first-order preferences A are preferred to first-order preferences B.

In some embodiments, where an item is represented at least in part by a concept in a semantic network, user preferences associated with the item may be specified by specifying user preferences for the concept. For instance, as previously described with respect to the illustrative examples of FIGS. 2A and 2B, the items shown in FIG. 2A are represented at least in part by the concept “car” shown in FIG. 2B. As such, user preferences for the items shown in FIG. 2A may be specified by specifying user preferences for the concept “car” shown in FIG. 2B.

User preferences for a concept may be specified at least in part by specifying preferences among descendants of the concept. For example, first-order order preferences for a concept may be specified based at least in part by specifying preferences among descendants of its attributes. For instance, in the illustrative example of FIG. 2B, first-order preferences for the concept “car” may be used to express a preference for one car over another car by specifying preferences among descendants (e.g., children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, etc. . . . ) of an attribute of the concept “car.” As a specific example, first-order preferences for the concept “car” may be used to express a preference for a less expensive car than a more expensive car by indicating that a smaller value among children of the attribute “price” is preferred over a larger value. As another specific example, first-order preferences for the concept “car” may be used to express a preference for a color of the car by indicating that, among the descendants of attribute “color,” the node “red” is preferred to the node “blue.” As another example, second-order preferences for a concept may be specified based at least in part by specifying preferences among its attributes. In the illustrative example of FIG. 2B, for instance, second-order preferences for the concept “car” may indicate that the attribute “price” is preferable to the attribute “color.”



Download full PDF for full patent description/claims.

Advertise on FreshPatents.com - Rates & Info


You can also Monitor Keywords and Search for tracking patents relating to this System and method for obtaining preferences with a user interface patent application.
###
monitor keywords

Browse recent Primal Fusion Inc. patents

Keyword Monitor How KEYWORD MONITOR works... a FREE service from FreshPatents
1. Sign up (takes 30 seconds). 2. Fill in the keywords to be monitored.
3. Each week you receive an email with patent applications related to your keywords.  
Start now! - Receive info on patent apps like System and method for obtaining preferences with a user interface or other areas of interest.
###


Previous Patent Application:
System and a method for remotely using electrical devices
Next Patent Application:
Object transfer method using gesture-based computing device
Industry Class:
Data processing: presentation processing of document
Thank you for viewing the System and method for obtaining preferences with a user interface patent info.
- - - Apple patents, Boeing patents, Google patents, IBM patents, Jabil patents, Coca Cola patents, Motorola patents

Results in 0.8865 seconds


Other interesting Freshpatents.com categories:
Qualcomm , Schering-Plough , Schlumberger , Texas Instruments ,

###

Data source: patent applications published in the public domain by the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). Information published here is for research/educational purposes only. FreshPatents is not affiliated with the USPTO, assignee companies, inventors, law firms or other assignees. Patent applications, documents and images may contain trademarks of the respective companies/authors. FreshPatents is not responsible for the accuracy, validity or otherwise contents of these public document patent application filings. When possible a complete PDF is provided, however, in some cases the presented document/images is an abstract or sampling of the full patent application for display purposes. FreshPatents.com Terms/Support
-g2-0.3238
Key IP Translations - Patent Translations

     SHARE
  
           

stats Patent Info
Application #
US 20120324367 A1
Publish Date
12/20/2012
Document #
13527900
File Date
06/20/2012
USPTO Class
715747
Other USPTO Classes
International Class
06F3/01
Drawings
18


Your Message Here(14K)


First-order


Follow us on Twitter
twitter icon@FreshPatents

Primal Fusion Inc.

Browse recent Primal Fusion Inc. patents

Data Processing: Presentation Processing Of Document, Operator Interface Processing, And Screen Saver Display Processing   Operator Interface (e.g., Graphical User Interface)   For Plural Users Or Sites (e.g., Network)   Interface Customization Or Adaption (e.g., Client Server)   End User Based (e.g., Preference Setting)