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Tv program database

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20120288260 patent thumbnailZoom

Tv program database


Before a programming guide is created, a unique code is assigned to each TV program that can be identified in the programming guide. Prior to the creation of the programming guide, a viewer selects the unique code corresponding to the TV show that the viewer would like to record whenever that TV show is broadcast. When the programming guide is created, the corresponding unique codes are associated with each TV program in the programming guide. The TV program corresponding to the viewer-selected unique code is then scheduled to be recorded in accordance with the announced broadcast schedule in the programming guide. A recording is made of the TV program corresponding to the viewer-selected unique code as the TV program is broadcast in accordance with the announced broadcast schedule in the programming guide.

Browse recent Microsoft Corporation patents - Redmond, WA, US
Inventors: Peter J. Potrebic, Thomas H. Taylor
USPTO Applicaton #: #20120288260 - Class: 386297 (USPTO) - 11/15/12 - Class 386 


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The Patent Description & Claims data below is from USPTO Patent Application 20120288260, Tv program database.

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RELATED APPLICATIONS

The present application is a continuation of, and claims priority from, U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/145,461 filed May 13, 2002, the disclosure of which is incorporated by reference herein.

TECHNICAL FIELD

The present invention relates to recording a television (TV) program broadcast on a channel. More particularly, the present invention relates to a database to keep track of TV programs that have been, or are desired to be, watched or recorded and from which there are selected TV programs for recording prior to their announced broadcast in a program guide.

BACKGROUND

Client devices in a television-based entertainment system include set top boxes such as cable boxes, satellite receivers, digital video recorders, and video cassette recorders (VCRs). Some client devices have recording capabilities and can be set-up by a viewer to record a television (TV) program that will be broadcast sometime in the future. Typically, the viewer will set-up a client device ahead of time so that it will record a TV program on a particular date at a certain starting time, on a particular broadcast channel, and for a particular duration. After the set-up on the particular date, the client device will automatically tune a tuner to the particular channel at the particular starting time and record the TV program being broadcast for the particular duration. After the recording of the TV program has been made, the recording can be played back for the enjoyment of the viewer.

The viewer can generally find programs to record by looking at a line-up of programs for various broadcast channels that is published in newspapers, magazines, and at Web sites on the Internet. Some client devices can receive a transmission of data from which there can be assembled an Electronic Programming Guide (EPG). Similar to the published line-up of programs, the EPG informs the viewer of future programming for which the viewer may wish to set up the client device to record.

While the published line-up of programs and the EPG are useful in finding television programs or shows to record, the selection from these are generally limited to a future time period not more than one to two weeks. This limitation is quite severe as compared to the universe of all television programming that is available for broadcasting. A viewer may wish to view a television program because a favorite actress is featured, or because the particular plot is of interest. The viewer, however, will not be able to find out when the television program will air if information regarding same appears neither in the published line-up of programs or the EPG. Since the viewer is not so informed as to a future date at which a desired television program will air, the viewer will not be able to set up the client device to record the television program. It would be an advantage in the art to provide a viewer will the ability to specify a television program to record even if it does not appear in a published line-up of programs or an EPG. Consequently, there is a need for improved databases, methods, apparatus, client devices, systems, and computer programs that can provide such a capability.

SUMMARY

In an implementation, databases, methods, apparatus, client devices, systems, and computer programs are used to assign a unique code to each TV program that can be identified in a programming guide before the programming guide is created. Prior to the creation of the programming guide, a viewer selects the unique code corresponding to the TV show that the viewer would like to record when that TV show is broadcast. When the programming guide is created, the corresponding unique codes are associated with each TV program in the programming guide. The TV program corresponding to the viewer-selected unique code is then scheduled to be recorded in accordance with the announced broadcast schedule in the programming guide. A recording is made of the TV program corresponding to the viewer-selected unique code as the TV program is broadcast in accordance with the announced broadcast schedule in the programming guide.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 illustrates an exemplary environment in which the databases, methods, apparatus, client devices, systems, and computer programs described herein may be implemented, and more particularly showing a content distribution system broadcasting to a plurality of client devices, where both the content distribution system and each client device is in communication with a two-way network.

FIG. 2 illustrates of an example client device, a television, and various input devices that interact with the client device.

FIG. 3 is a block diagram that illustrates components of the example client device(s) shown in FIGS. 1-2.

FIG. 4 is a flow diagram that illustrates a procedure for selecting a TV program for recording prior to its announced broadcast in a program guide and for scheduling the TV program to be recorded after its broadcast schedule is announced in the program guide.

FIG. 5 illustrates, in a front elevation view, an exemplary environment in which a client device outputs a section of an electronic program guide (EPG) resulting in a display of same upon a television, where the EPG lists each of a plurality TV programs scheduled for broadcast and their respective unique codes.

FIG. 6 shows the client device outputting, for display upon the television of FIG. 5, a subset of a universe list of TV programs that can be broadcast and their respective unique codes.

FIG. 7 shows the client device outputting diagnostics upon the television of FIGS. 5-6.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

A vast collection of audio-video (AV) content is available to be broadcast on a television broadcasting system, including previously broadcast (TV) shows, movies that had a run at ‘the box office’, past sporting events, etc. Additionally, new audio-video (AV) content is constantly being produced by motion picture studios (e.g. ‘Hollywood’), documentary producers, sporting associations (e.g. NFL, NBA, NHL, PGA, etc.) The more recently produced AV content, such as first run movies, are generally not released to broadcast television until they have had a run at ‘the box office’. Also, certain sporting events are broadcast annually or periodically, such as the World Series of Baseball in the USA, the Super Bowl of the NFL, and the various summer and winter Olympics sporting events. After the passage of time, and generally after a decline in interest of the public, each AV content is released to broadcast television. The exact date, time, and channel that each AV content will be broadcast are not known until this information appears in the publication a program guide. A viewer can review the contents of the program guide to locate a desired TV show and then set up a video recording device, such as a digital video recorder, to record the desired TV show at the date and time announced in the program guide.

In one implementation, each TV show that can be announced in a programming guide is assigned a unique code, called a show Identifier (ID), before the programming guide is created. This show ID, which is unique to its respective assigned TV show, can be created by an entertainment industry service provider, or other entity. The show IDs can the be made available on the Internet, such as via a Web hosting service. A client device, such as a set top box or digital video recorder, can communicate with the Web hosting service to obtain the show IDs. A viewer can then select one or more show IDs, either using the client device or other network resource, in order to designate corresponding TV shows that the viewer would like to record, whenever the respective TV shows are broadcast. Each such designation creates a request ID to indicate, for a corresponding show ID, that the viewer would like to make a recording of the corresponding TV show when it is broadcast.

When a programming guide is created, an event schedule for each TV show is given. Each TV show that appears in the programming guide is also associated with its respective show ID. The association of TV shows with respective show IDs can be performed by the publisher of the programming guide, one or more program data providers, and/or by an entertainment industry service provider or other entity such as a Web hosting service. The show IDs associated with the TV shows in the programming guide are then compared to those request IDs that were created based upon the viewer\'s previous selections. When a match is found, the TV show corresponding to the match is scheduled to be recorded according to its broadcast schedule in the programming guide. This scheduling is performed by the creation of a program event. The program event coordinates the recording of each TV program that the viewer previously selected when it is broadcast at the date and time announced in the programming guide. Either the scheduling of the recording and/or the actual recording of TV shows can be performed at a client device or other network resource.

A viewer can use a database to select for recording first run movies that are currently at ‘the box office’ when each is eventually broadcast. Moreover, TV shows that were previously broadcast can also be scheduled to be recorded even before a re-run of the same is announced in a programming guide. As such, a viewer can use the database of show IDs to schedule for recording both old and new TV shows even though the viewer has no way of knowing when they will be broadcast. Thus, the viewer can optionally avoid reviewing each published programming guide as it issues to find and set up to record those TV shows that the viewer knows in advance that the viewer would like to record. The viewer\'s experience with the client device is thereby enhanced.

Each programming guide contains event schedules. The programming guide can be received in the memory of the client device through a variety of techniques, and are generally within a guide database which can be an electronic program guide (EPG). The EPG can be received into the memory of the client device through a variety of techniques, including but not limited to trickle streaming the same from a satellite signal or from another program guide data provider. The EPG is typically continually supplied to the client device and includes information that relates to the programming content that will be broadcast in the future. More specifically, the guide data contains information that indicates, in advance, the starting time and ending time of the programs that are described by the guide data. The EPG also includes the channel, and the program title. Thus, when a request ID in the database of the client device has a corresponding Show ID that can be matched to a TV program listed in the EPG, the client device is directed to create a program event that coordinates the client device to record the program that is linked in the EPG at its corresponding broadcast time.

The discussion herein is directed to television-based entertainment systems, such as interactive TV networks, cable networks that utilize electronic program guides, and Web-enabled TV networks. Client devices in such systems range from full-resource clients with substantial memory and processing resources, such as TV-enabled personal computers, digital video recorders, and TV recorders equipped with hard-disks, to low-resource clients with limited memory and/or processing resources such as traditional set-top boxes and client devices that can record on to video tape such as video cassette recorders. While aspects of the described methods and computer programs can be used in any of these systems and for any types of client devices, they are described in the context of the following exemplary environment.

Exemplary Environment

FIG. 1 illustrates an exemplary environment 100 in which the methods, apparatus, client devices, computer programs, and systems described herein may be implemented. Exemplary environment 100 is a television entertainment system that facilitates distribution of content and program data to multiple viewers. The environment 100 includes one or more content providers 102, one or more program data providers 104, a content distribution system 106, and multiple client devices 108(1), 108(2), . . . , 108(N) coupled to the content distribution system 106 via a broadcast network 110.

Content provider 102 includes a content server 112 and stored content 114, such as movies, television programs, commercials, music, and similar audio and/or video content. Content server 112 controls distribution of the stored content 114 from content provider 102 to the content distribution system 106. Additionally, content server 102 controls distribution of live content (e.g., content that was not previously stored, such as live feeds) and/or content stored at other locations to the content distribution system 106.

Program data provider 104 includes an electronic program guide (EPG) database 116 and an EPG server 118. The EPG database 116 stores electronic files of program data 120 which is used to generate an electronic program guide (or, “program guide”). Program data includes program titles, ratings, characters, descriptions, actor names, station identifiers, channel identifiers, schedule information, and so on. The terms “program data” and “EPG data” are used interchangeably throughout this discussion. For discussion purposes, an electronic file maintains program data 120 that may include a program title 122, a program day or days 124 to identify which days of the week the program will be shown, and a start time or times 126 to identify the time that the program will be shown on the particular day or days of the week.

The EPG server 118 processes the EPG data prior to distribution to generate a published version of the program data which contains programming information for all channels for one or more days. The processing may involve any number of techniques to reduce, modify, or enhance the EPG data. Such processes might include selection of content, content compression, format modification, and the like. The EPG server 118 controls distribution of the published version of the program data from program data provider 104 to the content distribution system 106 using, for example, a file transfer protocol (FTP) over a TCP/IP network (e.g., Internet, UNIX, etc.). Further; the published version of the program data can be transmitted from program data provider 102 via a satellite 134 directly to a client device 108 by use of a satellite dish 134. The EPG data need not received via a video signal. Rather, the EPG data can be received by the client device by tuning to a low bandwidth carrier signal that piggybacks with other signals and is generally transmitted at a lower data rate than video signals that are transmitted by satellite.

Content distribution system 106 includes a broadcast transmitter 128, one or more content processors 130, and one or more program data processors 132. Broadcast transmitter 128 broadcasts signals, such as cable television signals, across broadcast network 110. Broadcast network 110 can include a cable television network, RF, microwave, satellite, and/or data network, such as the Internet, and may also include wired or wireless media using any broadcast format or broadcast protocol. Additionally, broadcast network 110 can be any type of network, using any type of network topology and any network communication protocol, and can be represented or otherwise implemented as a combination of two or more networks.

Content processor 130 processes the content received from content provider 102 prior to transmitting the content across broadcast network 108. Similarly, program data processor 132 processes the program data received from program data provider 104 prior to transmitting the program data across broadcast network 110. A particular content processor 130 may encode, or otherwise process, the received content into a format that is understood by the multiple client devices 108(1), 108(2), . . . , 108(N) coupled to broadcast network 110. Although FIG. 1 shows a single content provider 102, a single program data provider 104, and a single content distribution system 106, exemplary environment 100 can include any number of content providers and/or program data providers coupled to any number of content distribution systems.

Content distribution system 106 is representative of a headend service that provides EPG data, as well as content, to multiple subscribers. Each content distribution system 104 may receive a slightly different version of the program data that takes into account different programming preferences and lineups. The EPG server 118 creates different versions of EPG data (e.g., different versions of a program guide) that include those channels of relevance to respective headend services, and the content distribution system 106 transmits the EPG data to the multiple client devices 108(1), 108(2), . . . , 108(N). In one implementation, for example, content distribution system 106 utilizes a carousel file system to repeatedly broadcast the EPG data over an out-of-band (OOB) channel to the client devices 108.

Client devices 108 can be implemented in a number of ways. For example, a client device 108(1) receives broadcast content from a satellite-based transmitter via satellite dish 134. Client device 108(1) is also referred to as a set-top box or a satellite receiving device. Client device 108(1) is coupled to a television 136(1) for presenting the content received by the client device (e.g., audio data and video data), as well as a graphical user interface. A particular client device 108 can be coupled to any number of televisions 136 and/or similar devices that can be implemented to display or otherwise render content. Similarly, any number of client devices 108 can be coupled to a single television 136.

Client device 108(2) is also coupled to receive broadcast content from broadcast network 110 and provide the received content to associated television 136(2). Client device 108(N) is an example of a combination television 138 and integrated set-top box 140. In this example, the various components and functionality of the set-top box are incorporated into the television, rather than using two separate devices. The set-top box incorporated into the television may receive broadcast signals via a satellite dish (similar to satellite dish 134) and/or via broadcast network 110. In alternate implementations, client devices 108 may receive broadcast signals via a two-way network 109, such as the Internet, or any other broadcast medium.

Each client device 108 runs a universal TV program listing and selection application that utilizes the TV program data that can be preloaded into the client device, received by broadcast via broadcast network 110 such as from content distribution system 106, or received from two-way network 109. When client device 108 performs the execution of the universal TV program listing and selection application, a television viewer is enabled to navigate through an onscreen guide to locate one or more television shows in a universe of all television shows that can be broadcast. Thus, the television viewer can select those TV programs that the viewer is interested in recording when ever they are broadcast on broadcast network 110. When each such designed TV program does air as identified in the program data of an EPG, client device 108, in turn, creates one or more corresponding program events to make the recordings.

Each client device 108 also runs an EPG application that utilizes the program data. The EPG application enables a television viewer to navigate through an onscreen program guide and locate television shows of interest to the viewer. With the EPG application, the television viewer can look at schedules of current and future programming, set reminders for upcoming programs, and/or enter instructions to record one or more television shows. The client device 108, in turn, creates one or more corresponding program events for the recordings.

Also included in environment 100 are one or more network devices, such as a messaging server 150, that communicate with content distribution system 106 and with client devices 108 (1-N) through interconnected network 109, such as the Internet. Interconnected network 109 allows two-way communication between client devices 108 (1-N) to messaging server 150. This communication allows client devices 108 (1-N) and/or messaging server 150 to transmit addressed messages over interconnected network 109. Each message can contain a message that is addressed to network resource, such as to an email address at an email server, to a Web site address of a web site on the Internet, to facsimile telephone number of a facsimile machine on a telephone network, or as is conventional with other message delivery modalities. Each addressed message can contain information of or relating to client devices 108 (1-N) in the recording of TV programs that are requested by a viewer. By way of example, and not by way of limitation, a viewer can use the client device 108, or a personal computer or other network device to log on to network 109, such as the Internet, and to communicate with messaging server 150 or other network resource so as to locate any message that has been sent.

The messaging server 150 can be a network service, such as a Web hosting service, that stores data about any client device 108 or its respective viewer. The viewer can keep data at messaging server 150 that can in turn be accessed by other Web hosting services on the Internet where the viewer has permitted such access, which may be of a limited nature. An example of such a data provider is the Microsoft Network (MSN) of the Microsoft Corporation of Redmond, Wash. MSN provides a .NET™ PASSPORT® service that, among other services, stores data that can be retrieved by other Web services on the Internet that are compatible with the .NET™ PASSPORT® service. In this example, the viewer can submit various contact information to messaging server 150. These contact information can be one or more addresses to which messages are to be sent that contain information of or relating to the recording of viewer-designed TV programs with respect to a particular client device 108. When a TV program is first scheduled to air according to EPG data, and a viewer has previously indicated a desired to record the TV program with a particular client device 108, client device 108 can send a message to messaging server 150 over network 109. Messaging server 150 can identify the particular client device by the content of the message, and then transmit the message to the one or more addresses that the viewer has stored at messaging server 150.

The process and circumstances under which messaging server 150 transmits messages to the one or more addresses can be variously configured. For instance, messaging server 150 can be configured to transmit textual messages during daylight hours to a cellular telephone number and to transmit the same to a facsimile machine during evening hours. The configuration of a Web hosting service, such as messaging server 150, can be operated by the viewer from a two-way network resource having access to interconnected network 109, such as a personal computer or a local set top box client device. Of course, alternative configurations are contemplated as are conventional with message delivery modalities.

Optionally, one or more of the program data providers 104 can include stored on-demand content, such as Video On-Demand (VOD) movie content. The stored on-demand content can be viewed with a client device 108 through an onscreen movie guide, for example, and a viewer can enter instructions to stream a particular movie, or other stored content, down to a corresponding client device 108.

Exemplary Client Device

FIG. 2 illustrates an exemplary implementation 200 of a client device 108 shown as a standalone unit that connects to a television 136. Client device 108 can be implemented in any number of embodiments, including as a set-top box, a satellite receiver, a TV recorder with a hard disk, a game console, an information appliance, and so forth. Client device 108 includes a wireless receiving port 202, such as an infrared (IR) or Bluetooth wireless port, for receiving wireless communications from a remote control device 204, a handheld input device 206, or any other wireless device, such as a wireless keyboard. Handheld input device 206 can be a personal digital assistant (PDA), handheld computer, wireless phone, or the like. Additionally, a wired keyboard 208 is coupled to communicate with the client device 108. In alternate embodiments, remote control device 204, handheld device 206, and/or keyboard 208 may use an RF communication link or other mode of transmission to communicate with client device 108.

Client device 108 receives one or more broadcast signals 210 through from one or more broadcast sources, such as from a satellite or from a broadcast network. Client device 108 includes hardware and/or software for receiving and decoding broadcast signal 210, such as an NTSC, PAL, SECAM or other TV system video signal. Client device 108 also includes hardware and/or software for providing the viewer with a graphical user interface by which the viewer can, for example, access various network services, configure the client device 108, and perform other functions.

Client device 108 is capable of communicating through interconnected network 109 seen in FIG. 1 with other devices via one or more connections including a conventional telephone link 212, an ISDN link 214, a cable link 216, an Ethernet link 218, an ADSL and/or DSL link 220, and the like. Client device 108 may use any one or more of the various communication links 212-220 at a particular instant to communicate with any number of other devices and/or to establish a two-way communication with one or more network resources via network 109 seen in FIG. 1.

Client device 108 generates video signal(s) 220 and audio signal(s) 222, both of which are communicated to television 136. The video signals and audio signals can be communicated from client device 108 to television 136 via an RF (radio frequency) link, S-video link, composite video link, component video link, or other communication link. At reference numeral 203 in FIG. 2, client device 108 includes one or more lights or other request IDs identifying the current status of the device or for diagnostic reports to a viewer. Additionally, the client device may include one or more control buttons, switches, or other selectable controls for controlling operation of the device.

In FIG. 2, television 136 shows a display line 224 which can be used to inform a viewer that client device 108 has output a message as will be discussed below with respect to FIG. 7. The message so output can be issued to the viewer for their own edification and/or so that the viewer may take any action that may be warranted. Additionally, a diagnostic visual and/or audible alarm device or mechanism at reference numeral 203 can emit a diagnostic representative of that which is displayed at display line 224. In the alternative, both display line 224 and an alarm with the diagnostic visual and/or audible alarm device or mechanism at reference numeral 203 can be used so that the viewer may be warned visually and/or audibly.

FIG. 3 illustrates selected components of client device(s) 1.08 shown in FIGS. 1-2. Client device 108 includes one or more tuners 300(i). Tuners 300(i) are representative of one or more in-band tuners that tune to various frequencies or channels to receive television signals, as well as an out-of-band tuner that tunes to the broadcast channel over which the EPG data is broadcast to client device 108.

Client device 108 also includes one or more processors 304 and one or more memory components. Examples of possible memory components include a random access memory (RAM) 306, a disk drive 308, a mass storage component 310 such as a tape in a tape drive or removable media component in a removable media drive, and a non-volatile memory 312 (e.g., ROM, Flash, EPROM, EEPROM, etc.). Disk drive 308 can have one or a plurality of recordings (i) and one or a plurality of pause buffers (j) stored thereon. A TV program Database can be stored on disk drive 308 to keep a respective show identity (ID) for each TV program that can be broadcast. The TV program Database can also keep a request ID for one or more of the show IDs that a viewer wishes to record with client device 108. Also stored in the TV program Database is a log file of all TV programs that a household, client device 108, and/or a particular viewer wants to watch and/or record, or has previously watched and/or recorded. Recordings (i), pause buffers (j), and the TV program Database can also be stored in one or more other memory devices at client device 108, such as in non-volatile memory 312, RAM 306, and/or storage media 310. Alternatively, recordings (i), pause buffers (j), and the TV program Database can also be stored remote from client device 108 at a network resource in communication with client device 108 through interconnected network 109 seen in FIG. 1.

Alternative implementations of client device 108 can include a range of processing and memory capabilities, and may include more or fewer types of memory components than those illustrated in FIG. 3. For example, full-resource clients can be implemented with substantial memory and processing resources, including a disk drive 308 to store content for replay by the viewer. Low-resource clients, however, may have limited processing and memory capabilities, such as a limited amount of RAM 306, no disk drive 308, and limited processing capabilities. Nevertheless it is intended that client device 108 include a capability for video recording, either locally or remotely from client device 108.



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stats Patent Info
Application #
US 20120288260 A1
Publish Date
11/15/2012
Document #
13473283
File Date
05/16/2012
USPTO Class
386297
Other USPTO Classes
386E0507
International Class
04N5/775
Drawings
8



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