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Systems and methods for collection and/or manipulation of blood spots or other bodily fluids

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20120277629 patent thumbnailZoom

Systems and methods for collection and/or manipulation of blood spots or other bodily fluids


The present invention generally relates to systems and methods for receiving blood (or other bodily fluids) from a subject, e.g., from or beneath the skin of a subject. In some cases, the blood (or other bodily fluids) may be deposited on a membrane or other substrate. For example, blood may be absorbed in a substrate, and dried in some cases to produce a dried blood spot. In one aspect, the present invention is generally directed to devices and methods for receiving blood from a subject, e.g., from the skin, using devices including a substance transfer component (which may contain, for example, one or more microneedles), and directing the blood on a substrate, e.g., for absorbing blood. The substrate, in some embodiments, may comprise filter paper or cotton-based paper. After absorption of some blood onto the substrate, the substrate may be removed from the device and shipped or analyzed.

Browse recent Seventh Sense Biosystems, Inc. patents - Cambridge, MA, US
Inventors: Howard Bernstein, Donald E. Chickering, III, Shawn Davis, Ping Gong, Kristin Horton, Scott James
USPTO Applicaton #: #20120277629 - Class: 600578 (USPTO) - 11/01/12 - Class 600 
Surgery > Diagnostic Testing >Liquid Collection >Manually Supported Collector With Rigid Intake Tube (e.g., A Hollow Needle, Etc.) >Mechanical Means For Drawing Liquid Into Collection Reservoir

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The Patent Description & Claims data below is from USPTO Patent Application 20120277629, Systems and methods for collection and/or manipulation of blood spots or other bodily fluids.

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RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 61/480,941, filed Apr. 29, 2011, entitled “Plasma or Serum Production and Removal of Fluids under Reduced Pressure,” by Haghgooie, et al.; and of U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 61/549,437, filed Oct. 20, 2011, entitled “Systems and Methods for Collection and/or Manipulation of Blood Spots or Other Bodily Fluids,” by Bernstein, et al. Each of these is incorporated herein by reference.

FIELD OF INVENTION

The present invention generally relates to systems and methods for receiving blood (or other bodily fluids) from a subject, e.g., from or beneath the skin of a subject. In some cases, the blood (or other bodily fluids) may be deposited on a membrane or other substrate.

BACKGROUND

Phlebotomy or venipuncture is the process of obtaining intravenous access for the purpose of intravenous therapy or obtaining a sample of venous blood. This process is typically practiced by medical practitioners, including paramedics, phlebotomists, doctors, nurses, and the like. Substantial equipment is needed to obtain blood from a subject, including the use of evacuated (vacuum) tubes, e.g., such as the Vacutainer™ (Becton, Dickinson and company) and Vacuette™ (Greiner Bio-One GmBH) systems. Other equipment includes hypodermic needles, syringes, and the like. However, such procedures are complicated and require sophisticated training of practitioners, and often cannot be done in non-medical settings. Accordingly, improvements in methods of obtaining blood or other fluids from the skin are still needed.

SUMMARY

The present invention generally relates to systems and methods for receiving blood (or other bodily fluids) from a subject, e.g., from or beneath the skin of a subject. In some cases, the blood (or other bodily fluids) may be deposited on a membrane or other substrate. The subject matter of the present invention involves, in some cases, interrelated products, alternative solutions to a particular problem, and/or a plurality of different uses of one or more systems and/or articles.

In one aspect, the present invention is generally directed to a device for receiving blood from the skin and/or from beneath the skin of a subject. In one set of embodiments, the device includes a substance transfer component for receiving blood from the skin of the subject, a vacuum chamber having an internal pressure less than atmospheric pressure before blood is received into the device from the substance transfer component, and a substrate for absorbing blood received from the subject

In another set of embodiments, the device includes a substance transfer component for receiving the bodily fluid from the skin of the subject, a vacuum chamber having an internal pressure less than atmospheric pressure before the bodily fluid is received into the device from the substance transfer component, and a substrate for absorbing the bodily fluid received from the subject

The invention, in another set of embodiments, is generally directed to a method. In one set of embodiments, the method includes acts of applying a device to the skin of a subject, where in some cases, the device may apply reduced pressure to the skin of the subject, and withdrawing blood from the skin of the subject into the device such that at least a portion of the blood contacts a substrate for absorbing the blood.

The method in another set of embodiments, includes an act of receiving blood into a device by applying reduced pressure to the skin of the subject, where at least a portion of the blood within the device contacts a substrate for absorbing the blood.

In one aspect, the present invention is generally directed to a simple, one-piece, low-profile, high acceleration, high energy, actuation mechanism for inserting microneedles (or other objects) into the skin for the purpose of receiving substances, such as blood or interstitial fluid. In one set of embodiments, a device of the invention is actuated by a deployment actuator which can provide advantages in ease of operation, speed of operation, reduction or elimination of pain, etc.

In another aspect, the present invention is directed to a method of making one or more of the embodiments described herein, for example, devices for receiving a fluid such as blood from a subject. In another aspect, the present invention is directed to a method of using one or more of the embodiments described herein, for example, devices for receiving a fluid such as blood from a subject.

Other advantages and novel features of the present invention will become apparent from the following detailed description of various non-limiting embodiments of the invention when considered in conjunction with the accompanying figures. In cases where the present specification and a document incorporated by reference include conflicting and/or inconsistent disclosure, the present specification shall control. If two or more documents incorporated by reference include conflicting and/or inconsistent disclosure with respect to each other, then the document having the later effective date shall control.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Non-limiting embodiments of the present invention will be described by way of example with reference to the accompanying figures, which are schematic and are not intended to be drawn to scale. In the figures, each identical or nearly identical component illustrated is typically represented by a single numeral. For purposes of clarity, not every component is labeled in every figure, nor is every component of each embodiment of the invention shown where illustration is not necessary to allow those of ordinary skill in the art to understand the invention. In the figures:

FIGS. 1A-1B illustrate devices including a substrate for absorbing blood or other bodily fluids, according to certain embodiments of the invention;

FIGS. 2A-2B illustrate additional devices including a substrate for absorbing blood or other bodily fluids, according to various embodiments of the invention

FIG. 3 illustrates one embodiment including a plurality of substrates;

FIG. 4 illustrates various substrates including tabs or handles, in certain embodiments of the invention;

FIGS. 5A-5B illustrate an applicator region in accordance with certain embodiments of the invention;

FIGS. 6A-6B illustrate the formation of a pool of bodily fluid on the surface of the skin, in certain embodiments of the invention;

FIGS. 7A-7B illustrate various capillaries in accordance with certain embodiments of the invention; and

FIGS. 8A-8C illustrate a device in still another embodiment, illustrating a deployment actuator.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The present invention generally relates to systems and methods for receiving blood (or other bodily fluids) from a subject, e.g., from or beneath the skin of a subject. In some cases, the blood (or other bodily fluids) may be deposited on a membrane or other substrate. For example, blood may be absorbed in a substrate, and dried in some cases to produce a dried blood spot. In one aspect, the present invention is generally directed to devices and methods for receiving blood from a subject, e.g., from the skin, using devices including a substance transfer component (which may contain, for example, one or more microneedles), and directing the blood on a substrate, e.g., for absorbing blood. The substrate, in some embodiments, may comprise filter paper or cotton-based paper. After absorption of some blood onto the substrate, the substrate may be removed from the device and shipped or analyzed. In some cases, the device itself may be shipped or analyzed. For example, in some embodiments, a portion of the device may be sealed such that the substrate is contained within an airtight portion of the device, optionally containing desiccant. Other aspects are generally directed at other devices for receiving blood (or other bodily fluids), kits involving such devices, methods of making such devices, methods of using such devices, and the like.

As mentioned, certain aspects of the present invention are directed to substrates for absorbing blood and/or other bodily fluids, for example, a blood spot membrane. Thus, in some embodiments, blood spots may be produced on a blood spot membrane. In these cases, a channel within the device may have a small volume relative to the volume of a blood spot membrane which may be very porous and may collect fluid. The blood spot membrane is used to collect fluid in certain embodiments. The blood spot membrane is not used to separate cells/plasma (as opposed to the separation membranes discussed herein), in certain cases. Fluid may fill all, or a portion of, the blood spot membrane. A second hydrophobic membrane may be positioned on top of the collection membrane in some embodiments. Once fluid contacts the hydrophobic membrane, fluid collection may cease. The blood spot membrane may remain in the device to dry and can then be removed from the device. In some embodiments, the blood spot membrane may be removed from the device and dried outside of the device. In some cases, the membrane is not dried. If a vacuum is used to draw blood towards the blood spot membrane, the vacuum may be released prior to removal of the blood spot membrane from the device, at least in some embodiments.

In one set of embodiments, the substrate is contained within a device for receiving blood from the skin of a subject. Examples of such devices, and details of such devices able to contain a substrate for absorbing blood and/or other bodily fluids, are discussed in detail below. Additional examples of devices in which a substrate for absorbing blood and/or other bodily fluids may be utilized can be found in U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 61/480,977, filed Apr. 29, 2011, entitled “Delivering and/or Receiving Fluids,” by Gonzales-Zugasti, et al., incorporated herein by reference in its entirety for all purposes.

In one set of embodiments, the substrate for absorbing blood may comprise paper, e.g., that is able to absorb blood or other bodily fluids received by the device. The substrate may be able to partially or wholly absorb any blood (or other bodily fluid) that it comes into contact with. For example, the substrate may comprise filter paper, cellulose filters, cotton-based paper, e.g., made from cellulose filters, cotton fibers (e.g., cotton linters), glass fibers, or the like. Specific non-limiting examples that are commercially available include Schleicher & Schuell 903™ or Whatman 903™ paper (Whatman 903™ Specimen Collection Paper) (Whatman International Limited, Kent, UK), or Ahlstrom 226 specimen collection paper (Ahistrom Filtration LLC, Mount Holly Springs, Pa.). In some embodiments, the paper may be one that is validated in compliance with the requirements of the CLSI (Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute) LA4-A5 consensus standard. However, other materials may also be used for the substrate for absorbing blood, instead of and/or in addition to paper. For example, the substrate for absorbing blood (or other bodily fluids) may comprise gauze, cloth, cardboard, foam, foamboard, paperboard, a polymer, a gel, or the like. In some cases, the absorbent substrate may have a surface area of at least about 0.001 m2/g, at least about 0.003 m2/g, at least about 0.005 m2/g, at least about 0.01 m2/g, at least about 0.03 m2/g, at least about 0.05 m2/g, at least about 0.1 m2/g, at least about 0.3 m2/g, at least about 0.5 m2/g, or at least about 1 m2/g. In some cases, the absorbent substrate may have a surface area of about 100 g/m2 to about 200 g/m2, or about 150 g/m2 to about 200 g/m2.

The blood (or other bodily fluid) may be absorbed into the substrate such that the blood becomes embedded within fibers or other materials forming the substrate, and/or such that the blood becomes embedded in spaces between the fibers or other materials forming the substrate. For example, the blood may be held within or on the substrate mechanically and/or chemically (e.g., via clotting and/or reaction with fibers or other materials forming the substrate).

In some cases, the substrate may absorb a relatively small amount of blood. For example, less than about 1 ml, less than about 800 microliters, less than about 600 microliters, less than about 500 microliters, less than about 400 microliters, less than about 300 microliters, less than about 200 microliters, less than about 100 microliters, less than about 80 microliters, less than about 60 microliters, less than about 40 microliters, less than about 30 microliters, less than about 20 microliters, less than about 10 microliters, or less than about 1 microliter of blood may be absorbed into the substrate.

The substrate may be of any shape or size. In some embodiments, the substrate may be substantially circular, although in other embodiments, other shapes are possible, e.g., square or rectangular. The substrate may have any suitable area. For example, the substrate may be large enough to contain only one spot, of blood (e.g., of the above volumes), or more than one spot in some embodiments. For example, the substrate may have an area of no more than about 1 cm2, no more than about 3 cm2, no more than about 5 cm2, no more than about 7 cm2, no more than about 10 cm2, no more than about 30 cm2, no more than about 50 cm2, no more than about 100 cm2, no more than about 300 cm2, no more than about 500 cm2, no more than about 1000 cm2, or no more than about 3000 cm2.

In some embodiments, a “tab” or a handle, or other separate portion, may be present on or proximate the substrate, e.g., to facilitate analysis and/or manipulation of the absorbed blood or other bodily fluid. The handle may be any portion that can be used to manipulate the substrate. For example, a handle may be used to remove the substrate from the device for subsequent shipping and/or analysis, e.g., without requiring a person to touch the blood spot itself in order to manipulate the substrate. The handle may be formed from the substrate, and/or different material, for example, plastic, cardboard, wood, metal, etc. In some cases, the handle may surround all, or at least a portion of, the substrate. Non-limiting examples of such handles are illustrated in FIG. 4. For instance, in FIG. 4A, a tab 41 is formed as an integral part of the substrate 20. In FIG. 4B, a separate handle 44 surrounds substrate 20, including a separate tab 41.

In certain embodiments, the substrate may include stabilizers or other agents, e.g., for stabilizing and/or treating the blood in the substrate. Non-limiting examples of stabilizers include chelating agents, enzyme inhibitors, or lysing agents. Examples of chelating agents include, but are not limited to, EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) or dimercaprol. Examples of enzyme inhibitors include, but are not limited to, protease inhibitors (e.g., aprotinin, bestatin, calpain inhibitor I and II, chymostatin, E-64, leupeptin or N-acetyl-L-leucyl-L-leucyl-L-argininal, alpha-2-macroglobuline, Pefabloc SC, pepstatin, PMSF or phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride, TLCK, a trypsin inhibitor, etc.) or reverse transcriptase inhibitors (e.g., zidovudine, didanosine, zalcitabine, stavudine, lamivudine, abacavir, emtricitabine, entecavir, apricitabine, etc.). Non-limiting examples of lysing agents include distilled water or guanidinium thiocyanate.

One non-limiting example of a substrate able to absorb blood and/or other bodily fluids within a device may be seen in FIG. 1A. In this figure, device 10 is placed on the surface of skin 15. Additional examples of such devices are discussed in more detail below, and/or in documents incorporated herein by reference. In FIG. 1A, blood 30 (or another bodily fluid, such as interstitial fluid) from skin 15 enters device 10 via a substance transfer component 25. For example, a flow activator of the substance transfer component 25, such as one or more microneedles (not shown here) may be used to cause blood to flow into device 10 towards substrate 20. In this figure, substrate 20 is positioned so that blood entering device 10 will come into contact with substrate 20. At least a portion of the blood entering the device may be absorbed into the substrate. It should be understood, however, that other configurations are also possible. Thus, the substrate may be positioned at any suitable location within a device, e.g., such that blood (or other bodily fluid) is able to come into contact with at least a portion of the substrate when blood is received into the device. As non-limiting examples, a substrate may be positioned flush with the skin or in a recess, e.g., of the of the substance transfer component, the substrate may be positioned further away from the substance transfer component such that the blood flows through a portion of the device (e.g., through one or more channels) in order to reach the substrate, or the like. In some embodiments, the substrate may be positioned no more than about 1 mm, no more than about 2 mm, no more than about 3 mm, no more than about 4 mm, or no more than about 5 mm away from the surface of the skin when the device is applied to the surface of the skin of a subject.

Another embodiment is now described with reference to FIG. 1B; further details of this and other devices in accordance with certain aspects of the present invention are also described in further detail below. In this example figure, device 10 is applied to the skin 15 of a subject. The device in this figure is self-contained, i.e., such that the device is able to function to withdraw blood from a subject to produce plasma or serum without requiring external connections such as an external source of vacuum, an external source of power, or the like. In other embodiments, however, the device need not be self-contained.

A vacuum or a reduced pressure less than atmospheric or ambient pressure may be used to facilitate the movement of blood 30 into the device, as follows. The vacuum may be contained within device 10, for example, within vacuum chamber 35. Blood 30 on the skin 15 of the subject may become exposed to the vacuum or reduced pressure, which causes the blood to enter device 10, e.g., through applicator region 40 into inlet 42 of channel 45, moving towards substrate 50, which can be a substrate for absorbing blood, e.g., as previously discussed. Thus, when blood 30 reaches substrate 50, at least a portion of the blood may become absorbed into substrate 50. In some cases, some blood may also pass through substrate 50 into vacuum chamber 35.

Upon actuation of the device shown in FIG. 1B, for example, remotely or by pressing button 22, flow activators 25 are deployed into skin 15 of the subject. The flow activators may include one or more needles or microneedles, or other flow activators as discussed in detail below and/or in documents incorporated herein by reference. As shown in this figure, the deployment of flow activators 25 into skin 15 of the subject may be accomplished using a deployment actuator 28, or by other techniques such as those described herein. The deployment actuator 28 may include suitable components to deploy the flow activators 25, such as a button, a switch, a lever, a slider, a dial, a compression spring, a Belleville spring, a servo, rotary or linear electric motor, and/or a pneumatic apparatus, or other suitable device.

As another non-limiting example, FIG. 2A shows an underside of a fluid receiving device 10 according to another embodiment of the invention; a top view of the device may be seen in FIG. 2B. FIG. 2A shows a fluid transporter 120 that includes an opening 130, an applicator region 131, and a flow activator 90. In this embodiment, the flow activator 90 includes one or more needles. As described in more detail below, the needles may be extended from the opening 130 to pierce a subject\'s skin, and then retracted back into the opening to allow blood or other fluid to enter the opening 130. That is, to use device 10 to receive blood from a subject, the base 100 may be placed on the skin so that the opening 130 is adjacent the skin. Thereafter, a device actuator may be depressed to cause the needles to be deployed, piercing the skin and causing blood to be released. Blood may enter the opening and be collected in the storage chamber 140. In one embodiment, blood may flow into the storage chamber 140 as a result of a relatively low pressure (vacuum) in the device 10 that draws blood from the opening 130 and into a storage chamber internally of the device (not shown here). A substrate 20 for absorbing blood and/or other bodily fluids may be positioned within the storage chamber, and/or as part of base 100 of the device as is shown in FIG. 2B.

After being absorbed on the substrate, the blood (or other bodily fluid) may be allowed to dry and/or clot, in certain embodiments of the invention. Clotting of blood may occur naturally, e.g., upon exposure to air. Drying or clotting, in some cases, may occur through gaseous exchange with the external environment, and/or with an internal environment contained within the device, e.g., an environment with a relatively low relative humidity. For example, the internal or external environment may be one in which the relative humidity is less than about 50%, less than about 30%, less than about 25%, less than about 20%, less than about 15%, less than about 10%, or less than about 5%. As a specific example, the internal environment may be “pre-packaged” such that the device has a relatively low relative humidity before use, and/or a dessicant may be used to control the relative humidity within the device. In some cases, the device may include a heat source, such as a resistive heater, to facilitate drying and/or clotting.

Thus, in some embodiments, the device may contain desiccant. The desiccant may be “pre-packaged” in the device, and/or desiccant may be added after blood or other bodily fluids has been received into the device. For example, a cover or a lid may be put on the device after blood has been received into the device, where the cover or lid contains desiccant. Non-limiting examples of desiccant potentially suitable for the device include solid desiccants such as P2O5, CaSO4, CaCl2, silica, or the like. The desiccant may be present in the same chamber within the device as the substrate comprising absorbed blood (or other bodily fluids), and/or the desiccant may be present in a different chamber within the device, e.g., one in gaseous communication with the substrate.

In one set of embodiments, after blood is received on the substrate, the device may be manipulated in order to create an airtight seal around the substrate. For example, an internal portion of the device may be sealed off to create an airtight seal, e.g., forming an enclosed airtight chamber surrounding the substrate. In some embodiments, for instance, a portion of the device may be moveable or sealable to create an airtight portion within the device, or a cover or a lid may be added to the device, and/or brought into position on the device to create an airtight portion. A user of the device may manipulate the device to create the airtight portion, and/or the device may itself create the airtight portion, for example, upon removal of at least a portion of the substance transfer component from the subject. For example, in one set of embodiments, a cover or lid may be used to seal the substance transfer component from the external environment surrounding the device, thereby preventing exchange of gases from the substrate with the external environment. The cover or lid may be formed out of any suitable material, e.g., plastic, rubber, metal, or the like. As another example, a valve may be closed or the device may close a valve in order to form an airtight portion within the device containing the substrate. For example, a valve may be positioned on channel 45 in FIG. 1B that can be closed (manually or automatically) in order to form an airtight seal around substrate 50.

In some embodiments, blood or other bodily fluids may be stored within the device for later use and/or analysis, e.g., on a substrate such as previously discussed. For example, the substrate and/or the device may, in some embodiments, be sent to a clinical and/or laboratory setting, e.g., for analysis or storage. In some embodiments, the entire device and/or substrate may be sent to a clinical and/or laboratory setting; in other embodiments, however, only a portion of the device and/or substrate may be sent to a clinical and/or laboratory setting. For example, the substrate may be removed from the device, or a module containing the substrate may be removed from the device, e.g., for shipping or other transport. In some cases, the substrate and/or the device may be shipped using any suitable technique (e.g., by mail, by hand, etc.). Blood or other bodily fluids may be present during shipping in dried form (e.g., clotted), or while at least partially liquid, in some cases. In certain instances, the subject may give the substrate and/or the device to appropriate personnel at a clinical visit. For instance, a doctor may prescribe a device as discussed above for use by the subject, and at the next doctor visit, the subject may give the doctor the substrate and/or the device.

According to certain embodiments, the substrate and/or the device may be shipped with only minimal preparation, for example, where blood or other bodily fluids are present as spots (e.g., dry spots) on the substrates. In some cases, as discussed herein, the spots may be relatively small. For instance, the volume of the blood in a spot, prior to drying, may be less than about 100 microliters, less than about 80 microliters, less than about 60 microliters, less than about 40 microliters, less than about 30 microliters, less than about 20 microliters, less than about 10 microliters, or less than about 1 microliter. In certain embodiments, shipping may occur at room or ambient temperature, without the need for ice or dry ice to maintain constant or colder temperatures. In some cases, shipping may also be performed without the need for biohazard labeling.

In some embodiments, the substrate and/or the device may be contained within a suitable shipping container, for instance, an envelope or a box. For example, the envelope may be a paper envelope, a cardboard envelope, or the like. The box may be, for example, a paper box, a cardboard box, a plastic box, a metal box, etc. In some cases, the shipping container may be padded, e.g., with cloth, plastic bubbles, Styrofoam pellets, etc. In some cases, the shipping container may be airtight and/or the shipping container may contain a desiccant. In some embodiments, the device and/or the substrate may be placed in a shipping container in such a form that the substrate is exposed to at least the air within the shipping container, and the use of an airtight container and/or desiccant may serve to preserve blood or other bodily fluids absorbed within the substrate in a relatively dry state. Examples of desiccant include those described herein. In other embodiments, however, desiccant and/or an airtight container may not be necessary. For example, as previously discussed, the device itself may contain desiccant, or the blood may be dried on the substrate such that further precautions are unnecessary and the substrate may be shipped or otherwise manipulated (e.g., analyzed) while exposed to ambient conditions, and/or without any subsequent preservation steps.

In one aspect, the device and/or the substrate may include, and/or may be shipped with, a tracking apparatus. The tracking apparatus may be present as part of the device or as a part of a cover or lid for the device, and/or the tracking apparatus may be separate from the device but designed to be shipped with the device and/or the substrate. For example, the tracking apparatus may be formed as or be contained within a shipping container such as an envelope or a box for shipping the device and/or the substrate. In some cases, for example, the tracking apparatus may be attached to the envelope or box, or the tracking apparatus may be part of a holder designed to be shipped with the device and/or the substrate.

In one set of embodiments, the tracking apparatus may include an RFID transmitter or “tag.” A suitable scanner may be able to determine the RFID tag, e.g., when a shipping container such as an envelope or a box for shipping the device and/or the substrate is received, e.g., at a clinical and/or laboratory setting. As another example, a scannable target may be used as a tracking apparatus. For example, the scannable target may be a bar code, such as a 1- or 2-dimensional barcode, and may code information based on lines, colors, patterns, shapes, or any other features or combinations of features. In some embodiments, a scanner able to scan the scannable target may also be used. For example, in one set of embodiments, prior to or during use, the device may be held next to the scannable target such that the device is able to scan the scannable target, e.g., in order to activate the device, or to record data from the device, etc. As additional non-limiting examples, in other embodiments, the scannable target may be formed as part of the substrate, and the scannable target may be tracked after the substrate has received blood, before or after the substrate has been shipped, before or after analysis of blood (or other bodily fluid) on the substrate, etc.

In some cases, more than one substrate for absorbing blood and/or other fluids may be present in the device. For instance, more than one substrate for absorbing blood and/or other bodily fluids may be stacked together. For instance, in certain cases, excess blood (or other bodily fluid) is received by the device, and blood is able to saturate some of the substrates within the device. By use of multiple substrates in a stacked configuration, some substrates (e.g., a middle substrate) may be used for subsequent analysis, while other substrates (e.g., on the top and/or bottom) are simply present to absorb excess blood.

However, as mentioned, in some embodiments, more than one substrate may be used for subsequent analysis. In some cases, the substrates may also be arranged separately from each other, e.g., as is illustrated with respect to FIG. 3. In this figure, substrates 31, 32, 33, and 34 are arranged about a central region 39. Blood received into the device may pass through central region 35 to some or all of substrates 31, 32, 33, and 34, and some or all of these may then be subsequently analyzed, e.g., for different analytes such as those discussed herein.



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stats Patent Info
Application #
US 20120277629 A1
Publish Date
11/01/2012
Document #
13456546
File Date
04/26/2012
USPTO Class
600578
Other USPTO Classes
International Class
61B5/153
Drawings
9



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