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Advanced analyte sensor calibration and error detection

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Advanced analyte sensor calibration and error detection


Systems and methods for processing sensor data and self-calibration are provided. In some embodiments, systems and methods are provided which are capable of calibrating a continuous analyte sensor based on an initial sensitivity, and then continuously performing self-calibration without using, or with reduced use of, reference measurements. In certain embodiments, a sensitivity of the analyte sensor is determined by applying an estimative algorithm that is a function of certain parameters. Also described herein are systems and methods for determining a property of an analyte sensor using a stimulus signal. The sensor property can be used to compensate sensor data for sensitivity drift, or determine another property associated with the sensor, such as temperature, sensor membrane damage, moisture ingress in sensor electronics, and scaling factors.

Browse recent Dexcom, Inc. patents - San Diego, CA, US
Inventors: Michael J. Estes, Peter C. Simpson, Apurv Ullas Kamath
USPTO Applicaton #: #20120265036 - Class: 600309 (USPTO) - 10/18/12 - Class 600 
Surgery > Diagnostic Testing >Measuring Or Detecting Nonradioactive Constituent Of Body Liquid By Means Placed Against Or In Body Throughout Test

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The Patent Description & Claims data below is from USPTO Patent Application 20120265036, Advanced analyte sensor calibration and error detection.

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CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 61/476,145 filed Apr. 15, 2011. The aforementioned application is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety, and is hereby expressly made a part of this specification.

TECHNICAL FIELD

The embodiments described herein relate generally to systems and methods for processing sensor data from continuous analyte sensors and for self-calibration.

BACKGROUND

Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease, which occurs when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin (Type I), or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin it produces (Type II). This condition typically leads to an increased concentration of glucose in the blood (hyperglycemia), which can cause an array of physiological derangements (e.g., kidney failure, skin ulcers, or bleeding into the vitreous of the eye) associated with the deterioration of small blood vessels. Sometimes, a hypoglycemic reaction (low blood sugar) is induced by an inadvertent overdose of insulin, or after a normal dose of insulin or glucose-lowering agent accompanied by extraordinary exercise or insufficient food intake.

A variety of sensor devices have been developed for continuously measuring blood glucose concentrations. Conventionally, a diabetic person carries a self-monitoring blood glucose (SMBG) monitor, which typically involves uncomfortable finger pricking methods. Due to a lack of comfort and convenience, a diabetic will often only measure his or her glucose levels two to four times per day. Unfortunately, these measurements can be spread far apart, such that a diabetic may sometimes learn too late of a hypoglycemic or hyperglycemic event, thereby potentially incurring dangerous side effects. In fact, not only is it unlikely that a diabetic will take a timely SMBG measurement, but even if the diabetic is able to obtain a timely SMBG value, the diabetic may not know whether his or her blood glucose value is increasing or decreasing, based on the SMBG alone.

Heretofore, a variety of glucose sensors have been developed for continuously measuring glucose values. Many implantable glucose sensors suffer from complications within the body and provide only short-term and less-than-accurate sensing of blood glucose. Similarly, transdermal sensors have run into problems in accurately sensing and reporting back glucose values continuously over extended periods of time. Some efforts have been made to obtain blood glucose data from implantable devices and retrospectively determine blood glucose trends for analysis; however these efforts do not aid the diabetic in determining real-time blood glucose information. Some efforts have also been made to obtain blood glucose data from transdermal devices for prospective data analysis, however similar problems have occurred.

SUMMARY

OF THE INVENTION

In a first aspect, a method is provided for calibrating sensor data generated by a continuous analyte sensor, comprising: generating sensor data using a continuous analyte sensor; iteratively determining, with an electronic device, a sensitivity value of the continuous analyte sensor as a function of time by applying a priori information comprising sensor sensitivity information; and calibrating the sensor data based at least in part on the determined sensitivity value.

In an embodiment of the first aspect or any other embodiment thereof, calibrating the sensor data is performed iteratively throughout a substantially entire sensor session.

In an embodiment of the first aspect or any other embodiment thereof, iteratively determining a sensitivity value is performed at regular intervals or performed at irregular intervals, as determined by the a priori information.

In an embodiment of the first aspect or any other embodiment thereof, iteratively determining a sensitivity value is performed throughout a substantially entire sensor session.

In an embodiment of the first aspect or any other embodiment thereof, determining a sensitivity value is performed in substantially real time.

In an embodiment of the first aspect or any other embodiment thereof, the a priori information is associated with at least one predetermined sensitivity value that is associated with a predetermined time after start of a sensor session.

In an embodiment of the first aspect or any other embodiment thereof, at least one predetermined sensitivity value is associated with a correlation between a sensitivity determined from in vitro analyte concentration measurements and a sensitivity determined from in vivo analyte concentration measurements at the predetermined time.

In an embodiment of the first aspect or any other embodiment thereof, the a priori information is associated with a predetermined sensitivity function that uses time as input.

In an embodiment of the first aspect or any other embodiment thereof, time corresponds to time after start of a sensor session.

In an embodiment of the first aspect or any other embodiment thereof, time corresponds to at least one of time of manufacture or time since manufacture.

In an embodiment of the first aspect or any other embodiment thereof, the sensitivity value of the continuous analyte sensor is also a function of at least one other parameter.

In an embodiment of the first aspect or any other embodiment thereof, the at least one other parameter is selected from the group consisting of: temperature, pH, level or duration of hydration, curing condition, an analyte concentration of a fluid surrounding the continuous analyte sensor during startup of the sensor, and combinations thereof.

In an embodiment of the first aspect or any other embodiment thereof, calibrating the sensor data is performed without using reference blood glucose data.

In an embodiment of the first aspect or any other embodiment thereof, the electronic device is configured to provide a level of accuracy corresponding to a mean absolute relative difference of no more than about 10% over a sensor session of at least about 3 days, and wherein reference measurements associated with calculation of the mean absolute relative difference are determined by analysis of blood.

In an embodiment of the first aspect or any other embodiment thereof, the sensor session is at least about 4 days.

In an embodiment of the first aspect or any other embodiment thereof, the sensor session is at least about 5 days.

In an embodiment of the first aspect or any other embodiment thereof, the sensor session is at least about 6 days.

In an embodiment of the first aspect or any other embodiment thereof, the sensor session is at least about 7 days.

In an embodiment of the first aspect or any other embodiment thereof, the sensor session is at least about 10 days.

In an embodiment of the first aspect or any other embodiment thereof, the mean absolute relative difference is no more than about 7% over the sensor session.

In an embodiment of the first aspect or any other embodiment thereof, the mean absolute relative difference is no more than about 5% over the sensor session.

In an embodiment of the first aspect or any other embodiment thereof, the mean absolute relative difference is no more than about 3% over the sensor session.

In an embodiment of the first aspect or any other embodiment thereof, the a priori information is associated with a calibration code.

In an embodiment of the first aspect or any other embodiment thereof, the a priori sensitivity information is stored in the sensor electronics prior to use of the sensor.

In a second aspect, a system is provided for implementing the method of the first aspect or any embodiments thereof.

In a third aspect, a method is provided for calibrating sensor data generated by a continuous analyte sensor, the method comprising: generating sensor data using a continuous analyte sensor; determining, with an electronic device, a plurality of different sensitivity values of the continuous analyte sensor as a function of time and of sensitivity information associated with a priori information; and calibrating the sensor data based at least in part on at least one of the plurality of different sensitivity values.

In an embodiment of the third aspect or any other embodiment thereof, calibrating the continuous analyte sensor is performed iteratively throughout a substantially entire sensor session.

In an embodiment of the third aspect or any other embodiment thereof, the plurality of different sensitivity values are stored in a lookup table in computer memory.

In an embodiment of the third aspect or any other embodiment thereof, determining a plurality of different sensitivity values is performed once throughout a substantially entire sensor session.

In an embodiment of the third aspect or any other embodiment thereof, the a priori information is associated with at least one predetermined sensitivity value that is associated with a predetermined time after start of a sensor session.

In an embodiment of the third aspect or any other embodiment thereof, the at least one predetermined sensitivity value is associated with a correlation between a sensitivity determined from in vitro analyte concentration measurements and a sensitivity determined from in vivo analyte concentration measurements at the predetermined time.

In an embodiment of the third aspect or any other embodiment thereof, the a priori information is associated with a predetermined sensitivity function that uses time as input.

In an embodiment of the third aspect or any other embodiment thereof, time corresponds to time after start of a sensor session.

In an embodiment of the third aspect or any other embodiment thereof, time corresponds to time of manufacture or time since manufacture.

In an embodiment of the third aspect or any other embodiment thereof, the plurality of sensitivity values are also a function of at least one parameter other than time.

In an embodiment of the third aspect or any other embodiment thereof, the at least one other parameter is selected from the group consisting of: temperature, pH, level or duration of hydration, curing condition, an analyte concentration of a fluid surrounding the continuous analyte sensor during startup of the sensor, and combinations thereof.

In an embodiment of the third aspect or any other embodiment thereof, calibrating the continuous analyte sensor is performed without using reference blood glucose data.

In an embodiment of the third aspect or any other embodiment thereof, the electronic device is configured to provide a level of accuracy corresponding to a mean absolute relative difference of no more than about 10% over a sensor session of at least about 3 days; and wherein reference measurements associated with calculation of the mean absolute relative difference are determined by analysis of blood.

In an embodiment of the third aspect or any other embodiment thereof, the sensor session is at least about 4 days.

In an embodiment of the third aspect or any other embodiment thereof, the sensor session is at least about 5 days.

In an embodiment of the third aspect or any other embodiment thereof, the sensor session is at least about 6 days.

In an embodiment of the third aspect or any other embodiment thereof, the sensor session is at least about 7 days.

In an embodiment of the third aspect or any other embodiment thereof, the sensor session is at least about 10 days.

In an embodiment of the third aspect or any other embodiment thereof, the mean absolute relative difference is no more than about 7% over the sensor session.

In an embodiment of the third aspect or any other embodiment thereof, the mean absolute relative difference is no more than about 5% over the sensor session.

In an embodiment of the third aspect or any other embodiment thereof, the mean absolute relative difference is no more than about 3% over the sensor session.

In an embodiment of the third aspect or any other embodiment thereof, the a priori information is associated with a calibration code.



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stats Patent Info
Application #
US 20120265036 A1
Publish Date
10/18/2012
Document #
13446866
File Date
04/13/2012
USPTO Class
600309
Other USPTO Classes
International Class
61B5/00
Drawings
57



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