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Filter with memory, communication and pressure sensor / Millipore Corporation




Title: Filter with memory, communication and pressure sensor.
Abstract: The present invention describes a system and method for accurately measuring the pressure within a filter housing. A pressure sensor and a communications device are coupled so as to be able to measure and transmit the pressure within the filter housing while in use. This system can comprise a single component, integrating both the communication device and the pressure sensor. Alternatively, the system can comprise separate sensor and transmitter components, in communication with one another. In yet another embodiment, a storage element can be added to the system, thereby allowing the device to store a set of pressure values. The use of this device is beneficial to many applications. For example, the ability to read pressure values in situ allows integrity tests to be performed without additional equipment. In addition, integrity testing for individual filters within multi-filter configurations is possible. ...


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USPTO Applicaton #: #20110247429
Inventors: Anthony Dileo, John Dana Hubbard


The Patent Description & Claims data below is from USPTO Patent Application 20110247429, Filter with memory, communication and pressure sensor.

This application is a divisional application of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/984,341, filed Jan. 4, 2011, which is a divisional application of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 12/894,652, filed Sep. 30, 2010, which is a divisional application of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/402,438, filed Apr. 12, 2006, the disclosures of which are incorporated herein by reference in their entirety.

BACKGROUND

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OF THE INVENTION

The use of RFID tags has become prevalent, especially in the management of assets, particularly those applications associated with inventory management. For example, the use of RFID tags permits the monitoring of the production line and the movement of assets or components through the supply chain.

To further illustrate this concept, a manufacturing entity may adhere RFID tags to components as they enter the production facility. These components are then inserted into the production flow, forming sub-assemblies in combination with other components, and finally resulting in a finished product. The use of RFID tags allows the personnel within the manufacturing entity to track the movement of the specific component throughout the manufacturing process. It also allows the entity to be able to identify the specific components that comprise any particular assembly or finished product.

In addition, the use of RFID tags has also been advocated within the drug and pharmaceutical industries. In February 2004, the United States Federal and Drug Administration issued a report advocating the use of RFID tags to label and monitor drugs. This is an attempt to provide pedigree and to limit the infiltration of counterfeit prescription drugs into the market and to consumers.

Since their introduction, RFID tags have been used in many applications, such as to identify and provide information for process control in filter products. U.S. Pat. No. 5,674,381, issued to Den Dekker in 1997, discloses the use of “electronic labels” in conjunction with filtering apparatus and replaceable filter assemblies. Specifically, the patent discloses a filter having an electronic label that has a read/write memory and an associated filtering apparatus that has readout means responsive to the label. The electronic label is adapted to count and store the actual operating hours of the replaceable filter. The filtering apparatus is adapted to allow use or refusal of the filter, based on this real-time number. The patent also discloses that the electronic label can be used to store identification information about the replaceable filter.

A patent application by Baker et al, published in 2005 as U.S. Patent Application Publication No. US2005/0205658, discloses a process equipment tracking system. This system includes the use of RFID tags in conjunction with process equipment. The RFID tag is described as capable of storing “at least one trackable event”. These trackable events are enumerated as cleaning dates, and batch process dates. The publication also discloses an RFID reader that is connectable to a PC or an internet, where a process equipment database exists. This database contains multiple trackable events and can supply information useful in determining “a service life of the process equipment based on the accumulated data”. The application includes the use of this type of system with a variety of process equipment, such as valves, pumps, filters, and ultraviolet lamps.

Another patent application, filed by Jornitz et al and published in 2004 as U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2004/0256328, discloses a device and method for monitoring the integrity of filtering installations. This publication describes the use of filters containing an onboard memory chip and communications device, in conjunction with a filter housing. The filter housing acts as a monitoring and integrity tester. That application also discloses a set of steps to be used to insure the integrity of the filtering elements used in multi-round housings. These steps include querying the memory element to verify the type of filter that is being used, its limit data, and its production release data.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,936,160, issued to Moscaritolo in 2005, describes a wireless MEMS sensing device, for use with filtering elements. Moscaritolo describes a MEMS device, having at least two different sensors in a single assembly package. The patent discloses use of this MEMS device in the end cap of a filter, preferably for measuring differential pressure of a fluid, thereby allowing it to monitor the operating conditions within the housing. Related patents also describe the use of this MEMS device to estimate and predict a filter's life.

Despite the improvements that have occurred through the use of RFID tags, there are additional areas that have not been satisfactorily addressed. For example, there are a number of applications, such as in-situ filter integrity testing and filter life monitoring via transmembrane pressure changes, in which real time monitoring of the pressure at various points within the filter housing would be extremely beneficial.

SUMMARY

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OF THE INVENTION

The shortcomings of the prior art are overcome by the present invention, which describes a system and method for accurately measuring the pressure and/or flow at various points within a filter housing. In one embodiment, a sensor, capable of measuring the pressure at a specific point is used. In a second embodiment, a differential pressure sensor, capable of measuring the difference in pressure between two points, is employed. In a third embodiment, a gas flow meter is incorporated into the nose of a filter for directly measuring the flow of gas through that point in the filter. Similarly, a differential pressure sensor or a liquid flow sensor can be incorporated in a TFF module to measure the flow of critical fluids, like cleaning fluids, within a system. These sensors are in communication with a communications device so that the combination is able to measure and transmit the pressure measurement, while the filter is in use. This system can comprise a single component, integrating both the communication device and the pressure sensor. Alternatively, the system can comprise separate sensor and transmitter components, in communication with one another. The transmitter component can utilize either wired or wireless communication. In yet another embodiment, a storage element can be added to the system, thereby allowing the device to store a set of pressure values.

The use of this device is beneficial to many applications. For example, the ability to monitor transmembrane pressure across each filter individually in a multiple filter configuration improves the reliability and validity of an integrity test. This also allows the integrity of each filtering element to be individually determined in situ. The ability to monitor the transmembrane pressure within the filter housing also enables the plugging of multi-layer filters to be monitored, allowing the life of the filter to be estimated.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

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FIG. 1 is a representative embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a representative embodiment of the present invention as used in a multi-element filter configuration;

FIG. 3 is a first representative embodiment of the present invention as used to perform in situ integrity testing within multi-element filter configurations;

FIG. 4 is a second representative embodiment of the present invention as used to perform in situ integrity testing within multi-element filter configurations; and

FIG. 5 is a representative embodiment of the present invention as used to perform in situ integrity testing of tangential flow filters.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

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OF THE INVENTION

FIG. 1 illustrates a representative filtering system in accordance with the present invention. The filter element 10 is enclosed with a housing 20. The filter element can be simply a porous material, such as pleated paper or PVDF (Polyvinylidene fluoride) membrane. In an alternative embodiment, shown in FIG. 2, multiple filter elements 10 are enclosed within one housing 20. Alternatively, the filter element may comprise a frame, such as of plastic, and a porous material. Located in close proximity of, preferably affixed to, and most preferably embedded in, the end cap of filter element 10 is a pressure sensor 30. This sensor 30 is capable of generating an output, which varies as a function of the pressure of the surrounding environment. In another embodiment, the sensor is a differential sensor, whereby its output is a function of the difference is pressure between two areas. This output can be in the form of an analog voltage or current, or can be a digital value or pulse. In the preferred embodiment, the output varies linearly with the pressure, however this is not a requirement. Any output having a known relationship, such as logarithmic or exponential, to the surrounding pressure, can be employed. In such a situation, a transformation of the output can be performed to determine the actual measured pressure.

The pressure sensor 30 is preferably a differential sensor, and is mounted on, or preferably embedded in, the end cap of the filter element 10. The sensor is positioned such that it is capable of measuring both the upstream and downstream pressure. In some applications, the temperature of the filter element may exceed 145° C., therefore a sensor that is stable at these temperatures should be employed. Similarly, a transmitter capable of withstanding this temperature should be employed. Finally, the temperature with the housing 20 may cycle from lower temperatures to higher temperatures and back, therefore the pressure sensor should be able to withstand temperature cycling.

There are multiple embodiments of this pressure sensor. For example, this sensor can be constructed using micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) technology, a piezoelectric element, a conductive or resistive polymer, including elastomers and inks, or a transducer. While a differential pressure sensor is preferred, since it is the difference between the upstream pressure and the downstream pressure that is of interest, separate pressure sensors, one on either side of the filter, may also be employed. These examples are intended to be illustrative of some of the types of sensors that can be used; this is not intended to be an exhaustive list of all such suitable pressure sensors.

The pressure sensor 30 is in communication with a transmitter 40, which can be either wired or wireless. Mechanisms for transmitting wireless signals outside the housing have been disclosed and are known in the art. United States Patent Application Publication 2004/0256328 describes the use of an antenna to relay information between transponders located on the filter housing to a monitoring and test unit external to the housing.

For flow measuring applications, such as those shown in FIG. 3, the pressure sensor 30 may optionally be combined with a restriction orifice to achieve the sensitivity needed for the application. This orifice or venturi restriction device is typically used to measure liquid flow, but it may also be used to measure gas flow when higher sensitivity than can be achieved by measurement within the dimensions of the main flow path, like the core of a filter, is required. For example, the flow rate typically experienced during diffusion is 10 cc/min. In contrast, the flow rate during convection is 500 cc/min to 1000 cc/min.

FIG. 4 shows the use of flow rate sensors 70, instead of pressure sensors. There are multiple embodiments of direct flow rate measuring sensors. In gas flow measuring applications, flow measurement is typically determined by monitoring changes in temperature. These devices can be based upon an anemometer within which a current is passed and the anemometer wire heated. The anemometer is cooled due to the gas flow and this is measured as a current change in the sensor. Alternately, a slip stream of gas is passed through a narrow capillary within which are two thermal coils, one pulses heat into the flowing gas the other detects the time for the temperature pulse to reach it. This is correlated to total gas flow by properly designing the capillary to mail gas flow tube diameters. Other methods of measuring flow rate are known in the art, and are within the scope of the invention, as this list is not meant to be exhaustive. The location of the flow rate sensor is important, as certain locations within the filter housing are not subjected to the full flow. For example, a flow rate sensor near the end cap of the filter element would experience very little flow, especially as compared to one near the open end of the filter element.

A transmitter 40 is also located near, or integrated with, the sensor 30. In one embodiment, the transmitter 40 and the pressure sensor 30 are encapsulated in a single integrated component. Alternatively, the transmitter 40 and the sensor 30 can be separated, and in communication with each other, such as via electrical signals. Various types of communication are possible, such as wired and wireless. Various wireless communication devices are possible, although the use of an RFID tag is preferred. An active RFID tag allows regular communication with the reader. Alternatively, a passive RFID tag can be used, whereby the energy to transmit and sense the temperature is obtained from the electromagnetic field transmitted by the RFID reader.

Optionally, a storage element 50 can be used in conjunction with the transmitter 40 and the pressure sensor 30. This storage element 50, which is preferably a random access memory (RAM) or FLASH EPROM device, can be used to store a set of pressure readings, such as may be generated by regular sampling of the sensor.

This allows the rate at which the transmitter 40 sends data to be different from the rate at which the pressure is sampled. For example, the pressure may be sampled 10 times per second, while the data is transmitted only once per second.

A wireless receiver, 60, optionally located outside the filter housing 20, is used to communicate with the wireless transmitter. In the preferred embodiment, an RFID reader or base station is used. The reader can be configured such that it queries the transmitter at regular intervals. Alternatively, the reader can be manually operated so that readings are made when requested by the equipment operator. In another embodiment, the wireless receiver 60 also includes a storage element. This reduces the complexity required of the device within the housing. In this embodiment, the wireless receiver queries the wireless transmitter/pressure sensor at preferably regular intervals. It receives from the wireless transmitter the current pressure sensor measurement as determined at that time. The wireless receiver 60 then stores this value in its storage element. The capacity of the storage element can vary, and can be determined based on a variety of factors. These include, but are not limited to, the rate at which measurements are received, the rate at which the stored data is processed, and the frequency with which this storage element is in communication with its outside environment.




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stats Patent Info
Application #
US 20110247429 A1
Publish Date
10/13/2011
Document #
File Date
12/31/1969
USPTO Class
Other USPTO Classes
International Class
/
Drawings
0




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20111013|20110247429|filter with memory, communication and pressure sensor|The present invention describes a system and method for accurately measuring the pressure within a filter housing. A pressure sensor and a communications device are coupled so as to be able to measure and transmit the pressure within the filter housing while in use. This system can comprise a single |Millipore-Corporation
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