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Appliance development toolkit with editor for namespace allocation

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Title: Appliance development toolkit with editor for namespace allocation.
Abstract: An appliance development toolkit has an editor for namespace allocation and an interactive user interface on which the editor is displayed for use by a developer. The editor is used to select or allocate an identifier from a namespace having a universe of identifiers. A method for allocating identifiers from a namespace is also provided. ...

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USPTO Applicaton #: #20090327929 - Class: 715763 (USPTO) - 12/31/09 - Class 715 
Data Processing: Presentation Processing Of Document, Operator Interface Processing, And Screen Saver Display Processing > Operator Interface (e.g., Graphical User Interface) >User Interface Development (e.g., Gui Builder) >Graphical Or Iconic Based (e.g., Visual Program)



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The Patent Description & Claims data below is from USPTO Patent Application 20090327929, Appliance development toolkit with editor for namespace allocation.

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CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application is a continuation of PCT/US2009/046186 filed Jun. 3, 2009, which claims priority from U.S. Application Ser. No. 61/058,440 filed Jun. 3, 2008.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The invention relates to tools for editing software associated with the operation of household appliances.

DESCRIPTION OF THE RELATED ART

Household appliances typically comprise one or more components responsible for the electromechanical operations of the appliance. For example, an oven can include an appliance management component having a printed circuit board (PCB) with memory, as well as a user-interface component, such as a control panel or keypad, for a user to issue commands to the oven. As another example, a washing machine can include an appliance management component, a user-interface component, and a motor control component that controls a motor of the washing machine.

Typically, discrete circuits couple the internal components of an appliance, with each discrete circuit responsible for individual communication between related components. The circuits communicate with each other over an internal network that traditionally is implemented by hard-wired ribbon cables or other connectors or harnesses between the components. The hard-wired connectors form a closed system or network that is difficult or not possible to modify. For example, because the closed network relies on hard-coded or hard-wired network solutions, it is not practical to couple additional external components or additional internal components to the appliance to expand the capability or function of the appliance. The closed network cannot easily be adapted for communication with the additional external/internal components and therefore limits the potential of the appliance.

In some instances, service personnel can access the interior of an appliance and connect an external device to the internal network in order to modify the operation of or otherwise interact with the internal components of the appliance. However, scheduling appointments with service personnel can be inconvenient, and accessing the interior of the appliance can require the use of specialized tools and can potentially damage the appliance in the process. In addition, due to the limited potential of the internal components, the user of the appliance is unable to thoroughly personalize the operation of the appliance in order to tailor the appliance to his or her particular needs.

SUMMARY

OF THE INVENTION

According to one aspect of the invention, an appliance development toolkit is provided to enable creation of content to affect operation of a component in an appliance or to affect user interaction with an appliance. The toolkit comprises an editor having a first interface element for creating information associated with the content, a second interface element to select an identifier from a namespace having a universe of identifiers, and a third interface element to associate the identifier with the information, an interactive user interface on which the editor is displayed for use by a developer to observe and modify the creation, selection and association, and a converter to generate content using the identifier. The content identified by the identifier can be used by an appliance to affect operation of a component in an appliance or to affect user interaction with an appliance.

According to another aspect of the invention, a development toolkit is provided to enable creation of message data for a communications network. The toolkit comprises an editor having a first interface element for creating message data, a second interface element to allocate an identifier from a namespace having a universe of identifiers, and a third interface element to associate the identifier with the message data for communication in a message over the communications network wherein the allocation is registered at the namespace, and an interactive user interface on which the editor is displayed for use by a developer to observe and modify the allocation and association of the identifier. No other developer can use an identifier that has been allocated and the message data can be uniquely identified.

According to yet another aspect of the invention, a method is provided for allocating identifiers from a namespace for an appliance configured to perform a cycle of operation on an article wherein the appliance has a controller. The method comprises providing a system comprising a database a namespace having a universe of identifiers related to the operation of an appliance, storing in memory a state of each identifier in the namespace, receiving at least one request from a source to change the state of at least one identifier, authenticating in the system credentials associated with the source of the at least one request, selecting an identifier from the namespace in response to the request, and changing in the memory the state of the selected identifier according to the selection in response to the authentication and the selection. The state of the selected identifier determines the availability of the identifier for use by the appliance in performing the cycle of operation.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a schematic diagram showing the environment of an appliance development toolkit according to the invention.

FIG. 2 is a schematic diagram showing elements of an appliance development toolkit according to the invention.

FIG. 3 is a schematic diagram showing relationships among elements of the system configurator in the appliance development toolkit of FIGS. 1 and 2.

FIG. 4 is a diagram showing the functional relationship among some of the elements of FIG. 3.

FIG. 5 is a screen shot of an editor and a content viewer of an appliance development toolkit according to the invention.

FIG. 6A shows a first embodiment of a user interface as a result of using an appliance development toolkit according to the invention.

FIG. 6B shows a second embodiment of a user interface as a result of using an appliance development toolkit according to the invention.

FIG. 6C shows a third embodiment of a user interface as a result of using an appliance development toolkit according to the invention.

FIG. 7 is a screen shot of two editor windows in an appliance development toolkit according to the invention and a cycle structure for an appliance.

FIG. 8 is a schematic diagram showing the flow of information between an appliance and the system configurator in an appliance development toolkit according to the invention.

FIG. 9 is a schematic diagram showing the relationships of the control structure of an appliance to the system configurator of FIG. 8.

FIG. 10 is a screen shot of an editor in an appliance development toolkit according to the invention with a sequence model instance for a fault tree being created.

FIG. 10A is a screen shot of an attribute editor in an appliance development toolkit according to the invention showing the creation of a portion of the instance of FIG. 10.

FIG. 11 is a screen shot of an editor in an appliance development toolkit according to the invention with a sequence model instance for a fault tree being created.

FIG. 11A is a screen shot of a viewer in an appliance development toolkit according to the invention showing how the content resulting from the editor will appear.

FIG. 12 is a screen shot of the editor of FIGS. 10 and 11, and a screen shot of a graphical user interface in an appliance displaying a portion of the content from the editor.

FIG. 13A is a screen shot of the editor of FIGS. 10 and 11, and a screen shot of a graphical user interface in an appliance displaying another portion of the content from the editor in a query.

FIG. 13B is a screen shot of the editor of FIGS. 10 and 11, and a screen shot of a graphical user interface in an appliance displaying related portion of the content from the editor responsive to the query of FIG. 13A.

FIG. 14 is a screen shot of a viewer in an appliance development toolkit according to the invention showing a flow chart of the content in FIGS. 12-13B.

FIG. 15 illustrates an interaction between the content of FIGS. 12-13B and a user.

FIG. 16 is a screen shot of an editor in an appliance development toolkit according to the invention with a message data payload model instance being created

FIG. 17 is a schematic diagram showing the use of the message data payload model instance of FIG. 16 in an appliance.

FIG. 18 is a screen shot of a viewer in a target application showing the message traffic of the message data payload model instance of FIG. 16

FIG. 19 is a screen shot of a model instance editor in an appliance development toolkit according to the invention showing a step in the creation of a message data payload.

FIG. 20 is a screen shot of a model instance editor in an appliance development toolkit according to the invention showing another step in the creation of a message data payload.

FIG. 21 is a screen shot of a model instance editor in an appliance development toolkit according to the invention showing another step in the creation of a message data payload.

FIG. 22 is a screen shot of a model instance editor in an appliance development toolkit according to the invention showing another step in the creation of a message data payload.

FIG. 23 is a screen shot of a model instance editor in an appliance development toolkit according to the invention showing another step in the creation of a message data payload.

FIG. 24 is a schematic diagram showing a binding between appliance user domain data and control system domain data created by an editor in an appliance development toolkit according to the invention.

FIG. 25 is a schematic diagram showing use of a constrained appliance development toolkit according to the invention.

FIG. 26 is a schematic diagram showing a constrained appliance development toolkit according to the invention.

FIG. 27 is a screen shot of a model instance editor in an appliance development toolkit according to the invention showing aspects of a message data payload.

FIG. 28 is a schematic diagram showing elements of an appliance development toolkit according to the invention and an appliance that uses content from the appliance development toolkit in creating themes and animations.

FIG. 29 is a schematic diagram showing multiple bindings created by an appliance development toolkit according to the invention for user interface controls in an appliance.

FIG. 30 is a schematic diagram showing the message structure of forking elements in an appliance development toolkit according to the invention.

FIG. 31 is a screen shot of a model instance editor in an appliance development toolkit according to the invention showing a step in the creation of a message data payload with a forking element.

FIG. 32 is a screen shot of a model instance editor in an appliance development toolkit according to the invention showing another step in the creation of a message data payload with a forking element.

FIG. 33 is a screen shot of a model instance editor in an appliance development toolkit according to the invention with a properties viewer and information about it.

FIG. 34 is a screen shot of a model instance editor in an appliance development toolkit according to the invention with information about it.

FIG. 35 is a screen shot of a model instance editor in an appliance development toolkit according to the invention showing a step in the creation of a message data payload using holders.

FIG. 36 is a screen shot of a model instance editor in an appliance development toolkit according to the invention showing another step in the creation of a message data payload using holders.

FIG. 37 is a schematic diagram showing the use of holders in different a variable model according to the invention.

FIG. 38 is a schematic diagram showing a first scenario showing the relationships of variables.

FIG. 39 is a schematic diagram showing a second scenario showing the use and relationships of holders.

FIG. 40 is a schematic diagram showing a third scenario showing the use and relationships of holders.

FIG. 41 is a schematic diagram showing the use of paired elements in stain treatment in an appliance according to the invention.

FIG. 42 is a schematic diagram showing the use of development toolkits according to the invention with an appliance in the creation of cycle instances for the appliance.

FIG. 43 is a schematic diagram of a substitution model instance created according to the invention.

FIG. 44 is a schematic diagram showing the relationship between a cycle outcome model instance and sequence model instance according to the invention.

FIG. 45 is a schematic diagram showing the relationship among instance variants, user interface controls, and models according to the invention.

FIG. 46 is a schematic diagram showing a dynamic rendering of a graphical user interface in response an appliance receiving data from a sender according to the invention.

FIG. 47 is a schematic diagram showing the use of a test engine to diagnose an appliance according to the invention.

FIG. 48 is a schematic diagram showing the use of sequence model instances and cycle outcome model instances in meal planning according to the invention.

FIG. 48A illustrates a sequence model instance for recipes in FIG. 48.

FIG. 48B illustrates a sequence model instance for substitutions in FIG. 48.

DESCRIPTION OF EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION

Referring to the drawings and to FIG. 1 in particular, an appliance development toolkit 10 according to the invention, which will be referred to hereinafter as the toolkit 10, is configured to enable the creation and modification of content 20 to affect and/or effect operation of one or more components associated with an appliance 12 so as to affect and/or effect interaction between a user 14 and the appliance 12 and/or a cycle of operation of the appliance 12. The toolkit 10 can be used with different appliances 12 without requiring the recoding of software of the toolkit 10. The user 14 can be a consumer, a salesperson, a manufacturer 14A (see FIG. 25), a product engineer, or any other individual capable of using the appliance 12 and/or the toolkit 10.

The appliance 12 can be any suitable appliance, such as a household appliance. Examples of household appliances include, but are not limited to, clothes washing machines, clothes dryers, ovens, dishwashers, refrigerators, freezers, microwave ovens, trash compactors, and countertop appliances, such as waffle makers, toasters, blenders, mixers, food processors, coffee makers, and the like.

The appliance 12 can be configured to perform a cycle of operation to complete a physical domestic operation on an article. Examples of the physical domestic operations include a food preparation operation, a food preservation operation, a fluid treatment operation, a cleaning operation, a personal care operation, a fabric treatment operation, an air treatment operation, and a hard surface treatment operation. The air treatment operation can comprise, for example, air purification, air humidification, air dehumidification, air heating, and air cooling. The food preparation operation can comprise, for example, food cleaning, food chopping, food mixing, food heating, food peeling, and food cooling. The food preservation operation can comprise, for example, food cooling, food freezing, and food storage in a specialized atmosphere. The fluid treatment operation can comprise, for example, fluid heating, fluid boiling, fluid cooling, fluid freezing, fluid mixing, fluid whipping, fluid dispensing, fluid filtering, and fluid separation. The cleaning operation can comprise, for example, dishwashing, fabric washing, fabric treatment, fabric drying, hard surface cleaning, hard surface treatment, hard surface drying, carpet cleaning, carpet treatment, and carpet drying. The personal care operation can comprise, for example, hair treatment, nail treatment, body massaging, teeth cleaning, body cleaning, and shaving.

The components associated with the appliance 12 can include any devices, parts, software, and the like that participate in the operation of the appliance 12, either directly or indirectly. Some of the components have a corresponding controller (main controller, motor controller, user interface, etc.), which can be a simple microprocessor mounted on a printed circuit board (a control board), while other components can have no controller. The components can comprise one or more devices that are controlled by the controller. Typically, the controller components in cooperation, either directly or indirectly, through other components, control the operation of all of the components and the associated devices to implement a cycle of operation for the appliance 12.

The one or more components affected/effected by the toolkit 10 can comprise another appliance 12, one or more components on the appliance 12 or in another appliance 12, or an accessory device or component thereof for use with the appliance 12. For purposes of describing the invention, it will be understood that when reference is made herein to the use of the toolkit 10 in conjunction with the appliance 12, the same applies to the use of the toolkit 10 in conjunction with another appliance 12, with one or more components of the appliance 12 or of another appliance 12, and with an accessory device or component(s) thereof for use with the appliance 12.

The appliance 12 can be communicatively coupled to the toolkit 10 via a communications network 18 existing at least partially within the appliance 12 and/or at least partially external to the appliance 12 as appropriate. The communications network 18 comprises all of the coupling elements communicatively linking the various parts of the toolkit 10 and the appliance 12, as well as any coupling elements communicatively linking additional devices or resources to the toolkit 10 and/or appliance 12 (e.g. a coupling element connecting the appliance 12 with an accessory). For example, the communications network 18 can comprise an internal communications network of the appliance 12 enabling communication between the various components within the appliance 12, an external communications network connected to the toolkit 10, and a coupler for communicatively coupling the two networks. The coupler can comprise a communication driver configured to establish a communications link between the toolkit 10 and the appliance 12. Looking also at FIG. 2, the communication driver can be a smart driver 54 having expanded functionality enabling the smart driver 54 to create, modify, and/or interpret content 20. The communications network 18 can further comprises an additional communications connection between the appliance 12 and/or toolkit 10 and one or more additional devices, such as the accessory, an external network, a second appliance 12 or accessory, or one or more components thereof. As a non-limiting example, the additional communications connection can be to the Internet. The communications network 18 can comprise, at least in part, a smart coupler 56 as is disclosed in International Patent Application Publication No. 2009/058770, which is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety. The smart coupler 56 can incorporate the communications driver, which can be the smart driver 54.

The toolkit 10 enables a user 14 to create content 20 that can be provided to or otherwise obtained by one or more content targets 22 to affect the functionalities of the appliance 12. Content 20 can be formatted as at least one of a relational database, XML document, CSV file, binary file, data collection, memory structure, object structure, object graph, object tree, memory heap, machine code, source code, and text file, images, text, data elements, or other type of information associated with the toolkit 10 that can be interpreted, converted, propagated, created, modified, or otherwise used for some purpose by the toolkit 10, the appliance 12, or an associated device or component. Examples of content 20 include but are not limited to a cycle structure, a custom cycle, a branded cycle, user-attached data about appliance control functionality, a fault tree, a diagnostic test, an appliance user interface 64 (see FIG. 6A for example), appliance network communication, routing tables for appliance network communication, stain treatment, cooking, cooking algorithms, cooking vessels, meal preparation, dish preparation, recipes, units conversion, ingredients, ingredient substitution, dietary needs, appliance use and care, appliance FAQ, consumables meta data, and information associated with consumable, a cycle definition, cycle structure information, a paired element, source identification information, a message data payload structure, an electronic document that is human-readable, machine-readable, a communications specification/protocol, and information about a consumable.

Content 20 can comprise various forms of data or data elements, including appliance user domain data 180 (see FIG. 24), control system domain data 182 (see FIG. 24), and source identification domain data 186 (see FIG. 46). Appliance user domain data 180 includes information related to a user\'s 14 use of an appliance 12. It includes such things as washing and cooking preferences, recipes, user demographics, choices and selections that user makes, and the like. Control system domain data 182 includes information related to the control and operation of an appliance. It includes such things as cycle structures, cycle definitions, message payloads, communication protocols, and the like. Source identification domain data 186 includes information related to the sources of goods and services and includes things such as trademarks, brand names, service marks, jingles, and the like. User interface domain data includes information related to interacting with a user interface 64, which is preferably a graphical user interface 68. It includes such things as widgets, animation definitions, buttons, bars, sliders, knobs, and the like, whether real or virtual.

A content target 22 comprises any entity that receives content 20. Non-limiting examples of different content targets 22 include the toolkit 10, the appliance 12, the communications network 18, a system configurator 28, editors 30 and 32, converters 34, viewers 38, an appliance control system 90, a user interface 64 and graphical user interface 68, a web browser or web page, a personal computer 70, an application 50, a computer program, a handheld device, a remote client 72 such as a cell phone, a printer, and any hardware or software components or devices associated therewith or included therein.

As shown in FIGS. 2-4, the toolkit 10 comprises system configurator 28 having a model editor 30, a model instance editor 32, and one or more converters 34 configured to enable a user 14 to create, modify, and/or propagate content 20, such as models 40, model instances 42, and model instance variants 44, respectively. The toolkit 10 can further comprise one or more viewers 38 that function as content targets 22 and provide a visual display corresponding to the received content 20. Depending on the particular type of viewer 38 being used, viewers 38 can produce one or more of a variety of different displays or views ranging from schematic diagrams to code to images. The communications network 18 is configured to establish a communicative link between the system configurator 28 and at least one component associated with the appliance 12.

Different content targets 22 can use the same content 20 for different purposes. For example, a model instance editor 32 that receives content 20 in the form of a model instance 42 can provide a visual diagram of the model instance 42 and enable the user 14 to edit the model instance 42. However, if the same model instance 42 is sent to the appliance 12, the appliance 12 can be enabled with new operational capabilities, such as new cycles of operation. In another example shown in FIGS. 5 and 6A, the appliance 12 can receive the model instance 42 from the model instance editor 32 and provide the model instance 42 to a graphical user interface 68 of the appliance 12 in order to cause the graphical user interface 68 to display certain images and text.

Converters 34 can enable the flexible usage of content 20 by converting data elements or content 20 created by one of the editors 30, 32 into content 20 of a form suitable for use by a particular content target 22. For example, a type of converter 34 called a model instance converter is configured to produce a model instance variant 44 based on a model instance 42. Another type of converter 34 called a simple converter can simply propagate data elements or a file stored in memory and comprising data elements created by the toolkit 10 without having to substantially convert the data elements. Simple converters are best used when the content target 22 can operate directly on the data elements created by editors 30, 32, such as a content target 22 in the form of a viewer 38 included in the system configurator 28. Converters 34 are typically used to enable the transfer of data elements amongst the various entities of the toolkit 10 and appliance 12. A converter 34 can potentially also act as an exporter, which functions similarly to the propagating function described previously. The toolkit 10 can also include a converter 34 in the form of an encoder to encode content 20 onto a consumable information holder or other component.

The system configurator 28 can optionally further comprise one or more applications 50, which can also include one or more viewers 38 and can use content 20 provided by the system configurator 28. One or more applications 50 can also be communicatively coupled to but not included within the system configurator 28. Content 20 provided by the system configurator 28 can optionally be supplemented by content 20 provided by or created using resources 46, which can include any entities capable of producing content 20 or being used by another entity to generate content 20.

For testing, diagnostic, and engineering purposes, a link can be established between the system configurator 28 and a content target simulator 52 (FIG. 2). The content target simulator 52 typically comprises software and is intended to provide a realistic simulation of the operation of the appliance 12. The toolkit 10 thus comprises software configured to enable a user 14 to effectively command operation of the appliance 12 or of an appliance simulator and to create data or data elements for display to a user 14 as content 20 in a viewer 38 of the toolkit 10 based on the operation of the appliance 12. The user 14 can observe the content 20 in the viewer 38 and create or modify the content 20 using the toolkit 10 in response to communication over the communications network 18 and link.

A model 40 is a very robust, thorough, and thoroughly-vetted collection of data elements or structures equivalent to a UML class diagram. A model 40 consists of a plurality of class definitions where each class has a plurality of properties and each class can reference other classes a minimum and maximum number of times, which may be infinite. Classes can reference other classes via a named property. Classes can also, in effect, serve as extensions of other classes in order to inherit their functionalities, property definitions, and references. Classes can implement interfaces, which are definitions of collections of functions each having a set of arguments, wherein each argument can be set to one of a set of valid values. The purpose of the class definition is to provide rules or constraints for creating model instances 42 and model instance variants 44, which are, in essence, runtime instances of the model 40. Thus, the toolkit 10, in effect, enables users 14 to create runtime instances of a class diagram and is configured to create, manage, and/or edit models 40, model instances 42, and model instance variants 44, as well as data elements or information associated therewith, that are configured to effect the functionality of one or more components associated with the appliance 12.

As described in more detail hereinafter with respect to FIGS. 25 and 26, the model editor 40 is typically used by a user 14 associated with the manufacturer 14A of the toolkit 10 or of the appliance 12, such as an engineer or software developer, to refine and constrain models 40 prior to the models 40 being made available to users 14 external to the manufacturer 14A. The provides the manufacturer 14A with the ability to control the specific toolkit 10 functionalities available to users 14 outside the company, and, in doing so, provides the ability for the manufacturer 14A to offer and sell licenses for the toolkit 10 that enable users 14 access to only certain levels of functionality. Each particular model 40 in essence is a template or a plurality of constraints defining at least part of the functionality of the system configurator 28. Each model 40 enables at least one model instance editor 42 and defines the functionalities of the model instance editor 42. Thus, n models 40 can be used with the toolkit 10 to generate n instances of data elements derived therefrom. An exemplary data element can comprise at least one representation of a portion of a message data payload to be sent across the communications network 18.

The model instance editor 42 creates instances of data elements that comprise a model instance 42 and that are related to appliance 12 functionality and derived from the appliance user domain data 180 model. The model instance editor 42 is configured at least in part by the appliance user domain data 180 model irrespective of the appliance 12 so that the toolkit 10 can be used with different appliances 12. Validation rules, which essentially comprise a communications protocol, for the content 20 can be derived from the appliance user domain model. The model instance 42 can comprise a hierarchical data structure, a graph, a fault tree, or a relational database and can be configured or developed by a user 14 interacting with the user interface 64.

Referring now to FIGS. 5-7, models 40 can be grouped into a variety of types based on the function of the model 40 and model instances 42 created therefrom. A user interface domain data model 40A can be used to create user interface domain data model instances 42A, such as that illustrated in FIGS. 5 and 7, which are used to control the functionality of a user interface 64 of the appliance 12, which can be a graphical user interface 68. In this example, the user interface domain data model instance 42A includes user interface control objects 60A-C displayed in the model instance editor 32 and corresponding to each of three user interface controls 62A-C to be displayed on the user interface 64 of the appliance 12. The user interface control objects 60A-C are converted or propagated by a converter 34 included in the system configurator 28 into content 20, which is sent to a content target 22 of the system configurator 28, the viewer 38. Looking now to FIG. 6A, the viewer 38 then creates a rendering of the graphical user interface 68 as it would appear on the appliance 12 once the user interface domain data model instance 42A has been sent to the appliance 12 as content 20. This simulation enables the user 14 to observe and, if desired, modify the appearance of the graphical user interface 68 without having to repeatedly reprogram the appliance 12 itself. As illustrated in FIGS. 6B and 6C, the user interface domain data model instance 42A can also be sent to other content targets 22, such as a personal computer 70 or a remote client 72, as content 20 to enable the user 14 to visualize the user interface 64 and tailor the user interface 64 to his or her particular needs and tastes.

A sequence model 40B as shown in FIG. 7 is another type of model 40 that can be used to create cycles, fault trees, recipes, and tests (see also FIG. 47). As described herein, the same sequence model 40B can be used to generate a variety of different types of sequence model instances (e.g. instances for a cycle, a fault tree, a recipe, or a test). In some alternative embodiments, multiple sequence models can be required to generate the different types of sequence model instances. A sequence model instance for a cycle 42B that is derived from the sequence model 40B is illustrated as a content target 22 of the user interface domain data model instance 42A. In this example, an object 60A of the sequence model instance for a cycle 42B corresponding to a user interface control 62A for dispensing ice is propagated or, if necessary, converted by a converter 34 associated with the user interface domain data model instance 42A or sequence model instance for a cycle 42B into the appropriate format and is provided to the sequence model instance for a cycle 42B.

Due to this binding of user interface domain data of the user interface domain data model instance 42A and control system domain data 182 of the sequence model instance for a cycle 42B, when a user 14 actuates the user interface control 62A, the transition will be initiated, and the cycle specified by the sequence model instance for a cycle 42B and created in the manner explained below will be carried out to produce ice.



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stats Patent Info
Application #
US 20090327929 A1
Publish Date
12/31/2009
Document #
12556623
File Date
09/10/2009
USPTO Class
715763
Other USPTO Classes
709206, 726 19
International Class
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Data Processing: Presentation Processing Of Document, Operator Interface Processing, And Screen Saver Display Processing   Operator Interface (e.g., Graphical User Interface)   User Interface Development (e.g., Gui Builder)   Graphical Or Iconic Based (e.g., Visual Program)