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Expandable condiment cup and storage system

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Title: Expandable condiment cup and storage system.
Abstract: An apparatus for an expandable condiment cup that is configured to attach to a common fast-food type food scoop or other surface to provide hands-free access to a condiment. An attachable storage device for multiple cups in the collapsed state is also disclosed. In one embodiment, the condiment cup is made of rigid sheet material and uses fold lines as hinges to change from the collapsed, storage state to its deployed, or expanded, state. In the deployed state, the cup takes on the form of an inverted pyramid forming a reservoir for a condiment. In one embodiment, the collapsed condiment cup has a substantially planar shape. The condiment cup is stored in its collapsed state in a condiment cup holder configured to hold multiple collapsed condiment cups. The condiment cup holder is removably attachable to various surfaces. ...


USPTO Applicaton #: #20090152283 - Class: 220720 (USPTO) - 06/18/09 - Class 220 
Receptacles > Container Attachment Or Adjunct >Expanding Or Contracting Portion Or Component



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The Patent Description & Claims data below is from USPTO Patent Application 20090152283, Expandable condiment cup and storage system.

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US 20090152283 A1 20090618 US 11955597 20071213 11 20060101 A
B
65 D 25 20 F I 20090618 US B H
US 220720 Expandable condiment cup and storage system Pegram Roy
Manchester TN US
omitted US
Mathisen Steinar
Eagleville TN US
omitted US
KNOX PATENTS
P.O. BOX 30034 KNOXVILLE TN 37930-0034 US
STEINMARK, INC. 02
Eagleville TN US

An apparatus for an expandable condiment cup that is configured to attach to a common fast-food type food scoop or other surface to provide hands-free access to a condiment. An attachable storage device for multiple cups in the collapsed state is also disclosed. In one embodiment, the condiment cup is made of rigid sheet material and uses fold lines as hinges to change from the collapsed, storage state to its deployed, or expanded, state. In the deployed state, the cup takes on the form of an inverted pyramid forming a reservoir for a condiment. In one embodiment, the collapsed condiment cup has a substantially planar shape. The condiment cup is stored in its collapsed state in a condiment cup holder configured to hold multiple collapsed condiment cups. The condiment cup holder is removably attachable to various surfaces.

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

Not Applicable

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

Not Applicable

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of Invention

This invention pertains to a condiment cup. More particularly, this invention pertains to an expandable condiment cup that is configured to attach to a common fast-food type food scoop or other surface to provide hands-free access to a condiment. This invention also pertains to an attachable storage device for holding multiple condiment cups in their collapsed state.

2. Description of the Related Art

In today's fast-paced society, fast-food restaurants and take-out counters are extremely popular and useful. Fast-food restaurants and take-out counters were created to meet the demands of a mobile society. Typically, food products are purchased from such places when there is little or no time to stop for a leisurely meal. With particular food products, such as fried foods, it is often desirable to provide a condiment for dipping or scooping. In the fast-food environment, condiments, such as ketchup, mustard, and various sauces are often desired for immediate consumption with fried foods.

People often purchase these food products with the expectation to enjoy their food while engaged in another activity, such as occupying a car, walking, waiting for a bus, etc. Condiments are typically provided in small pillow packs or cups and are often difficult to use effectively without being seated at a table. The procedure for using a condiment while in fast-paced environments can be very messy. One method of combining sauce to food products is to squeeze out the condiment from the package onto a surplus food wrapper where the consumer can dip their food into the condiment. Other methods such as pouring the condiment onto the food or dipping the food into the condiment container provided by the restaurant are also commonly employed. The condiment is subject to being dropped, which may soil clothing, fingers, and other surroundings. Each of these methods of eating food with a condiment is very inconvenient, oftentimes causing the consumer to not use any sauce, thus diminishing the culinary experience of consuming the food.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,842,634, titled “Folding cup,” issued to Kieler on Dec. 1, 1998, discloses a folding drinking cup that is formed from a single sheet of planar plastic or paper. The folding cup has an inverted pyramid shape formed by folding a planar sheet and sealing the side edge to form a handle with the top open.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,720,429, titled “Food container with flip-out condiment pocket,” issued to Cordle on Feb. 24, 1998, discloses a paperboard container that may be “flipped from a storage position to an operable position.” The '429 patent discloses a food container and condiment pocket formed together from a single blank of paperboard stock.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,364,112, titled “Condiment container for attaching to other objects,” issued to Pitschka on Apr. 2, 2002, discloses a sealed condiment container that includes a hinged adhesive strip that allows the container to be attached to another object.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,230,969, titled “Food container and sauce reservoir arrangement,” issued to Spransy on May 15, 2001, discloses different embodiments of a sauce reservoir that attach to a food container by clips or an adhesive strip. The adhesive strip, protected by a removable strip, is attached to either the food container or the sauce reservoir. Removing the removable strip exposes the adhesive, allowing the sauce reservoir to attach to the food container.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,471,119, titled “Food scoop with condiment holder,” issued to Cai on Oct. 29, 2002, discloses a collapsible, conical food scoop that includes a condiment compartment. The food scoop with condiment holder is formed from a unitary blank of material. The '119 patent further discloses a “flat, collapsed configuration” for storage that may be “shifted to an open, use configuration by squeezing two portions of the container together.” In the flat state, there is “an upper edge portion 34 [that] extends peripherally beyond upper edges 37 and 39 and provides a finger grip location at which the condiment triangular panel 36 can be gripped and pulled out by a consumer.”

U.S. Pat. No. D478,283, titled “Container,” issued to Shimakawa on Aug. 12, 2003, discloses a cone-shaped container formed of a single sheet in which the sides and bottom are sealed.

U.S. Pat. App. No. 2007/0003171, titled “Condiment pouch for food containers,” published on Jan. 4, 2007 for Boosalis, discloses a condiment pouch that is adhesively attached to a food container. The Boosalis application discloses a condiment pouch with a fixed oval bottom portion and smooth, flexible front and back sides.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

According to one embodiment of the present invention, an expandable condiment cup for attaching to a food scoop is provided. The food scoop has an outside surface. The condiment cup is attached to the outside surface of the food scoop, in one embodiment, by double-sided tape. The condiment cup, in its deployed, or expanded, state, is an inverted, truncated, irregular pentagonal pyramid forming a reservoir for condiments. The five walls that make up the body of the condiment cup are, in one embodiment, made from a single sheet of rigid paperboard or other planar sheet material. When collapsed, the condiment cup is substantially the thickness of two sheets of the paperboard. Deployment of the cup, in one embodiment, is facilitated by a notch that is cut out of one of the two thicknesses of paperboard. The five walls of the condiment cup are developed, in one embodiment, by bending the paperboard along preformed fold lines, or hinges, to form a pyramid and then folding over the apex of the pyramid.

The condiment cup is stored in its collapsed state in a condiment cup holder configured to hold multiple collapsed condiment cups. The condiment cup holder, in one embodiment, is removably attachable to a planar surface. The condiment cup holder, in one embodiment, is made removably attachable by using double-sided tape. In one embodiment, the double-sided tape has an integral non-adhesive tab extending beyond the body of the condiment cup holder to facilitate removal of the condiment cup holder from the surface to which it is attached.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS

The above-mentioned features of the invention will become more clearly understood from the following detailed description of the invention read together with the drawings in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of one embodiment of a condiment cup in its deployed state attached to a food scoop;

FIG. 2 is a front perspective view of the condiment cup in its deployed state;

FIG. 3 is a rear perspective view of the condiment cup in its deployed state;

FIG. 4 is an exploded diagram showing the condiment cup in its collapsed state and one embodiment of a condiment cup holder;

FIG. 5 is a rear view of the condiment cup holder;

FIG. 6 is a plan view of one embodiment of a unitary blank for forming a condiment cup; and

FIG. 7 is a partial plan view of another embodiment of a unitary blank for forming a condiment cup.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

An apparatus for an expandable condiment cup 100 and a system for storing the condiment cup 100 is disclosed. The condiment cup 100 is attachable to a planar surface and receives a condiment after it is in its expanded state. The system includes a holder 400 that is attachable to a planar surface and receives and stores a plurality of condiment cups 100 in their collapsed state.

FIG. 1 illustrates a perspective view of a condiment cup 100 in its deployed, or expanded, state forming a reservoir 102 for a condiment. The condiment cup 100 is attached to a food scoop 104. The illustrated location of the condiment cup 100 allows the consumer to easily access a condiment in the reservoir 102 when dipping the food 106 served in the food scoop 104. In various embodiments, the condiment cup 100 is attachable in other locations and to other planar surfaces. The shape of the condiment cup 100 efficiently uses the condiment. The reservoir 102 is very small at the bottom of the cup 100 and the walls of the condiment cup 100 are angled such that the condiment level rises substantially as the food, French fries in the illustration, 106 is inserted into the condiment. This configuration more completely coats the food 106 than conventional, flat-bottomed containers when using the same amount of condiment.

In the illustrated embodiment, the condiment cup 100, in its expanded state, is attached to a food scoop 104 before use. The reservoir 102 of the condiment cup 104 is then filled with a condiment, for example, ketchup. The food 106, for example, French fries, are inserted, or dipped, into the reservoir 102. Because of the inverted, pyramidal shape of the condiment cup 100, the food 106 displaces the condiment in the reservoir 102 and causes the condiment level to increase in the cup 100. The increased level covers more of the surface of the food 106 as it is dipped than would be covered if the condiment container had parallel walls.

FIG. 2 illustrates a front perspective view of the condiment cup 100 in its deployed, or expanded, state. In one embodiment, the condiment cup 100 is made of paperboard material. In other embodiments, the condiment cup 100 is made of plastic, waxed paper, or other sheet-like materials impervious to condiments. In the illustrated embodiment, there is a rounded notch 204 where the two front walls 208, 210 meet at an edge 206. The notch 204 facilitates deployment of the condiment cup 100 as well as providing improved access to the condiment within the cup.

The walls 208, 210 of the condiment cup 100, in one embodiment, have a surface suitable for printing indicia 202-A, such as product or customer branding, slogans, logos, or other information. The pair of front walls 208, 210 have an area for printing indicia 202-A. The location of the indicia 202-A is suitable for presenting advertising information to the user of the condiment cup 100 because the indicia 202-A is exposed to the user when the cup 100 is attached to a surface for use.

FIG. 3 illustrates a rear perspective view of the condiment cup 100 in its deployed, or expanded, state. In the illustrated embodiment, the condiment cup 100 has planar sheet-like walls 208, 210, 212, 214, 216 and has the shape of an inverted, irregular pentagonal pyramid. The bottom of the condiment cup 100 is a formed transverse fold 218 where the apex, or tip, 302 of the cup 100 is folded over. The apex 302 is affixed to the back walls 212, 214, 216 by adhesive bonding. The transverse edge 218 of the folded over apex 302 of the cup 100 reduces waste of the condiment by reducing the unusable volume at the bottom of the reservoir 102. The folded over apex 302 also removes a point from the bottom of the condiment cup 100 for the safety of those who handle the condiment cup 100 and to ensure that the reservoir 102 is sealed at its closed bottom.

The back wall 214 of the condiment cup 100 provides a planar surface configured for attaching the cup 100 to another planar surface, for example, a surface of a food scoop 104. In the illustrated embodiment, the back wall 214 has an adhesive strip 304 that extends over a portion of the length of the back wall 214. In one embodiment, the adhesive strip 304 is a section of double-sided tape that has an outer adhesion surface that is covered by a removable film 308. The film 308 is removed by the user when it is desirable to affix the condiment cup 100 to a surface, such as the food scoop 104 illustrated in FIG. 1. The seam line 306 illustrated on the back wall 214 indicates the edge of a first end panel 310 where it overlaps a back panel 214. The back wall 214 has an outer surface to which the first end panel 310 is attached.

The walls 212, 216 of the condiment cup 100, in one embodiment, have a surface suitable for printing indicia 202-B such as product or customer branding, slogans, logos, or other information. The pair of front walls 208, 210 have an area for printing indicia 202-A. The location of the indicia 202-A is suitable for presenting information to the user of the condiment cup 100 when the user is deploying the condiment cup 100 because the indicia 202-A is exposed to the user as the cup 100 is expanded and attached to a surface for use. In one embodiment, the indicia 202-B is a slogan, such as “Arrive Alive—Do not eat and Drive!” In other embodiments, the indicia 202-B include trademark information, use instructions, or information on obtaining refill or additional condiment cups 100.

FIG. 4 illustrates an exploded diagram showing the condiment cup 100′ in its initial, collapsed state and a condiment cup holder 400. In the illustrated embodiment, the collapsed state 100′ of the condiment cup 100 is the shape of a truncated circular sector having a substantially planar shape. There are two front walls 208, 210 divided by a fold line, or hinge, 206 to facilitate deployment of the condiment cup 100. The rounded notch 204 of the top layer of paperboard is located along the arc at the top of the two front walls 208, 210. With the condiment cup 100′ in its collapsed configuration (illustrated in FIG. 4), the notch 204 provides access to both sides of the back wall 214 to aid in separating the back wall 214 from the pair of front walls 208, 210 to expand the condiment cup 100′ from its collapsed state, or configuration, to its expanded state, or configuration.

In the illustrated embodiment, the condiment cup holder 400 has a front panel 408, a rear panel 404, and two side walls 410. The bottom of the holder 400 is open to allow the bottom of the condiment cup 100′ to pass through and protrude below the holder 400. The condiment cup holder 400 is configured as a truncated circular sector similar to the condiment cup 100, such that the condiment cup 100 is held in place when inserted vertically into the condiment cup holder 400 as shown in the illustrated embodiment. In one embodiment, the condiment cup holder 400 is made with paperboard. In another embodiment, the condiment cup holder 400 is molded with plastic or made of another rigid material. In the illustrated embodiment, the front panel 408 has a centrally located cut-away window 412 extending from the arc down one-half the height of the front panel 408. The cut-away window 412 is of such a size as to leave a portion of the front panel 408 on either side of the cut-away window 412 to secure the condiment cup 100 when installed.

In the illustrated embodiment, the front side of both the front 408 and rear 404 walls have a surface, or area, suitable for printing indicia 202-C, 202-D, such as product or customer branding, slogans, logos or other figures. The indicia 202-C on the front of the rear wall 404 is visible when the holder 400 is empty. The location of the indicia 202-C is suitable for displaying a message to refill the holder 400 and identifying where to obtain replacements. The indicia 202-D visible on the front panel 408 of the holder 400 is visible at all times. The location of the indicia 202-D is suitable for displaying an advertising message that is readily visible whenever a user removes a condiment cup 100′ from the holder 400.

FIG. 5 illustrates a rear perspective view of the condiment cup holder 400. The condiment cup holder 400 is removably attachable, in the illustrated embodiment, by a strip of adhesive tape 504 attached to the rear side of the rear panel 404. The adhesive strip 504 has a lower portion attached to the holder 400 and having an outer adhesion surface that is covered by a removable film 502 that is removable by the user when it is desirable to affix the condiment cup holder 400 to a surface, such as the dash of an automobile. The adhesive tape 504 has an upper portion, or tab, 506 that has no adhesive on its front and rear surfaces. The upper portion 506 extends above the top of the holder 400 and provides a gripping member for pulling the holder 400 away from the surface it is attached to.

The rear side of the rear panel 404 has a surface, or area, suitable for printing indicia 202-E such as product or customer branding, slogans, logos or other figures.

FIG. 6 illustrates a plan view of a unitary blank 600 of sheet material for forming the condiment cup 100. The unitary blank 600 is sized and configured to form the condiment cup 100, which has two sides, the inside and the outside. The side shown in FIG. 6 is the outside. The unitary blank 600, in the illustrated embodiment, is cut from flat sheet stock in the shape of a circular sector. Six circular sector regions 208, 210, 212, 214a, 216, 310 are defined by fold, or hinge, lines 206, 606, 608, 612, 614. In another embodiment, the outside circumference of the unitary blank 600 has straight-cut edges defining all three sides of each region 208, 210, 212, 214a, 214b, 216, 310.

The fold lines 206, 606, 608, 612, 614, in one embodiment, are lines of weakening formed in the sheet of the blank 600. The lines of weakening are hinges about which the regions 208, 210, 212, 214a, 216, 310 flex. The fold lines 206, 606, 608, 612, 614 facilitate the deployment of the condiment cup 100 by creating stress concentrations that will cause bending to occur along the stress concentrations when an outside force is applied. The fold lines 206, 606, 608, 612, 614 form hinges about which adjacent walls 310, 216, 208, 210, 212, 214a pivot. That is, adjacent walls 310, 216, 208, 210, 212, 214a are hingedly connected to adjacent the adjacent wall 310, 216, 208, 210, 212, 214a. One fold line 206 joins the front walls 208, 210. Another fold line 608 acts as the first hinge when the condiment cup 100 is in its collapsed state 100′ joining a front wall 208 to a back wall 216. Another fold line 612 acts as the second hinge when the condiment cup 100 is in its collapsed state 100′ joining the other front wall 210 to a back wall 212. Another fold line 614 joins the central back wall 214 to an adjacent back wall 212. Another fold line 606 joins the other back wall 216 to the panel 310. The back wall 214 includes the regions 214a, 214b, 310, where two regions 214b, 310 overlap and are secured to each other.

With the condiment cup 100′ in its collapsed state, the fold lines 608, 612 are flexed such that the regions 208, 208 are adjacent to the regions 216, 212, 214a. The other fold lines 606, 206, 614 are not flexed for the collapsed configuration 100′. With the condiment cup 100 in its expanded state, the fold lines 606, 608, 206, 612, 614 are flexed such that the cup 100 has a shape of an inverted pentagonal pyramid. In other embodiments, the number of walls 208, 210, 212, 214, 216 varies such that the inverted pyramidal-shape has other than five sides.

In the illustrated embodiment, the apex, or tip, 302 of the blank 600 is formed at the convergence of the vertices of the regions 208, 210, 212, 214a, 214b, 216, 310. The transverse fold 218 is shown in the flat form in FIG. 6. In one embodiment, the transverse fold 218 is defined by a line of weakening formed in the unitary blank 600. After the blank 600 is formed into the collapsed state of the condiment cup 100′, the portion between the transverse fold 218 and the tip 302 is folded and secured to the back wall 214. With the tip 302 folded, the condiment cup 100 has the shape of a truncated, inverted pyramid.

The rounded notch 204 is created by cutting away an area from the unitary blank 600. In the illustrated embodiment, the condiment cup 100 is assembled in at least two steps where the two end regions 214b, 312 are attached to each other and the apex, or tip, 302 is folded along the transverse fold 218 and attached to the back wall 214, 310. In one embodiment, one surface of one end region 310 is adhered to the opposite surface of the other end region 214b. In various embodiments, the end region 310 is inside or outside the reservoir 102 of the condiment cup 100.

FIG. 7 illustrates a partial plan view of another embodiment of the tip 302′ of the unitary blank 600′. In one embodiment, the tip 302′ is formed at the convergence of the vertices of two regions 208, 210. The other regions 212, 214a, 214b, 216, 310 are truncated at edges 702 that follow the path of the transverse fold 218 illustrated in FIG. 6. After the blank 600′ is formed into the collapsed state of the condiment cup 100′, the portion between the transverse fold 218′ and the tip 302′ is folded and secured to the back wall 214. The two regions 208, 210 making up the tip 302′ are the two front walls of the condiment cup 100′ in the collapsed state. The tip 302′ is the thickness of one sheet of material, so the overall thickness where the tip 302′ is folded over is thinner than where the tip 302 from FIG. 6 is folded over.

The condiment cup 100 and condiment cup holder 400 includes various functions. The function of collapsing into a substantially planar configuration is implemented, in the illustrated embodiment, by fold lines 608, 612 defining hinges. The fold lines 206, 606, 608, 612, 614 create stress concentrations that encourage particular bending patterns. In the illustrated embodiment, the fold lines 206, 606, 608, 612, 614 are presented such that when the condiment cup 100 is collapsed into a flat, two-layer configuration, two walls 208, 210 form one layer and three walls 212, 214, 216 form a second layer. The two layers are folded along two of the fold lines 608, 612 acting as hinges.

The function of providing for removing the holder 400 from a surface is implemented, in one embodiment, by a non-adhesive tab 506 extending beyond the body of the condiment cup holder 400. The non-adhesive tab 506 provides an easily accessed member for pulling the adhesive strip 504 and attached condiment cup holder 400 from the surface to which it is attached.

The function of containing a condiment is implemented, in one embodiment, by the reservoir 102 defined by the walls of the pyramid 208, 210, 212, 214, 216 and the lateral line 218 that are presented when the condiment cup 100 is deployed.

The function of securing the condiment cup 100 to another surface is implemented, in one embodiment, by an adhesive strip 304 attached to the back wall 214. The adhesive strip is covered by a removable film 308 to be removed by the user when it is desirable to affix the condiment cup 100 to a surface.

The function of providing for marketing indicia 202 is implemented, in one embodiment, by various flat markable surfaces provided on the condiment cup 100 and the condiment cup holder 400.

From the foregoing description, it will be recognized by those skilled in the art that a collapsible condiment cup 100 and holder 400 for storing the condiment cup 100 has been provided. The condiment cup 100 is presented with two states, one state is the deployed, or expanded, state, which, in the illustrated embodiment, is in the form of an inverted, truncated pyramid. The other state is the initial collapsed state 100′. In the collapsed state 100′, the condiment cup 100 is stored in the condiment cup holder 400. The condiment cup holder 400 is configured to hold multiple collapsed condiment cups 100.

According to one embodiment of the present invention, a collapsible condiment cup 100 for attaching to a food scoop 104 is provided. The food scoop 104 has an outside surface. The condiment cup 100 is removably attached to the outside surface of the food scoop, in one embodiment, by double-sided tape 304. The condiment cup 100, in its deployed state, is an inverted, truncated pyramid forming a reservoir 102 for condiments. The walls of the pyramid 208, 210, 212, 214, 216 that make up the body of the condiment cup 100 are, in one embodiment, made from a single sheet of rigid paperboard 600. When the condiment cup 100′ is in the collapsed state, the condiment cup 100′ is the thickness of two sheets of the paperboard except for a small section where the sheets forming the back wall 214 overlap. Deployment of the condiment cup 100, in one embodiment, is facilitated by a notch 204. The five walls of the pyramid 208, 210, 212, 214, 216 defining the condiment cup 100 are developed, in one embodiment, by bending the paperboard along preformed fold lines 206, 606, 608, 612, 614 to form an irregular pentagonal pyramid and then folding over the apex of the pyramid 302.

The condiment cup 100′ is stored in its collapsed state in a condiment cup holder 400 configured to hold multiple collapsed condiment cups 100′. The condiment cup holder 400, in one embodiment, is removably attachable to another planar surface. The condiment cup holder 400, in one embodiment, is made removably attachable by an adhesive strip 304. In one such embodiment, the adhesive strip 304 has an integral non-adhesive tab 506 extending beyond the body of the condiment cup holder 400 to facilitate removal of the condiment cup holder 400 from the surface to which it is attached.

While the present invention has been illustrated by description of several embodiments and while the illustrative embodiments have been described in considerable detail, it is not the intention of the applicant to restrict or in any way limit the scope of the appended claims to such detail. Additional advantages and modifications will readily appear to those skilled in the art. The invention in its broader aspects is therefore not limited to the specific details, representative apparatus and methods, and illustrative examples shown and described. Accordingly, departures may be made from such details without departing from the spirit or scope of applicant's general inventive concept.

What is claimed is: 1. An apparatus for receiving and dispensing a condiment, said apparatus comprising: a condiment cup having a plurality of walls, said condiment cup having a collapsed state and an expanded state, said condiment cup having a substantially planar configuration when in said collapsed state, said condiment cup defining a reservoir for receiving a condiment when said condiment cup is in said expanded state, said reservoir having an opening at a top and a closed bottom, said reservoir tapering down from said top to said closed bottom; and a holder dimensioned to receive said condiment cup when in said collapsed state, said holder having an open bottom through which a portion of said received condiment cup protrudes, said holder having a back wall attachable to another planar surface. 2. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said plurality of walls form an inverted pyramid when said condiment cup is in said expanded state. 3. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said plurality of walls form an inverted, irregular pentagonal pyramid when said condiment cup is in said expanded state. 4. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein adjacent ones of said plurality of walls are hingedly connected. 5. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said plurality of walls includes a back wall, said back wall having an outside surface that is substantially planar, and further including an adhesive disposed on said outside surface, said adhesive having a removable sheet whereby said condiment cup is attachable to another planar surface when said removable sheet is removed. 6. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said plurality of walls include a pair of front panels, said pair of front panels having a notch adjacent said top. 7. The apparatus of claim 1 further including an area on one of said plurality of walls, said area having indicia printed within said area. 8. An apparatus for receiving and dispensing a condiment, said apparatus comprising: a plurality of walls hingedly connected, each of said plurality of walls being substantially rigid, said plurality of walls having a collapsed state and an expanded state, said plurality of walls having a flat configuration with two, substantially planar outer surfaces when said plurality of walls are in said collapsed state, said plurality of walls defining a reservoir for receiving the condiment when said plurality of walls are in said expanded state, said reservoir having an opening at a top and a closed bottom, said reservoir tapering down from said top to said closed bottom; and one of said plurality of walls being attachable to a planar surface. 9. The apparatus of claim 8 wherein said plurality of walls in said expanded configuration define an inverted pyramid. 10. The apparatus of claim 8 further including a notch in one of said plurality of walls adjacent said top of said reservoir, whereby said notch aids in separating said plurality of walls to achieve said expanded state from said collapsed state. 11. The apparatus of claim 8 wherein said one of said plurality of walls being attachable to a planar surface includes an adhesive disposed on an outside surface of said one of said plurality of walls, said adhesive having a removable sheet whereby said one of said plurality of walls is attachable to said planar surface when said removable sheet is removed from said adhesive. 12. The apparatus of claim 8 further including an area on one of said plurality of walls, said area having indicia printed within said area. 13. The apparatus of claim 8 further including a holder dimensioned to receive and hold said plurality of walls when in said collapsed state, said holder having an open bottom through which a portion of said received plurality of walls protrudes, said holder having a back wall attachable to another planar surface. 14. An apparatus for receiving and dispensing a condiment, said apparatus comprising: a back wall being substantially planar; a first rear side wall being substantially planar, said first rear side wall being hingedly connected to said back wall; a first front wall being substantially planar, said first front wall being hingedly connected to said first rear side wall; a second front wall being substantially planar, said second front wall being hingedly connected to said first front wall; and a second rear side wall being substantially planar, said second rear side wall being hingedly connected to said second front wall, said second rear wall being hingedly connected to said back wall, said back wall, said first and second rear side walls, and said first and second front walls having a collapsed configuration and an expanded configuration, said collapsed configuration having a substantially planar shape, and said expanded configuration with said back wall, said first and second rear side walls, and said first and second front walls defining a reservoir having a substantially inverted pyramid-shape. 15. The apparatus of claim 14 wherein said back wall and said first and second rear side walls are substantially congruent to said first and said second front walls when said apparatus is in said collapsed configuration. 16. The apparatus of claim 14 wherein a tip of each of said back wall, said first and second rear side walls, and said first and second front walls is folded to form a transverse edge. 17. The apparatus of claim 14 further including a notch in said first front wall and said second front wall adjacent a top of said reservoir. 18. The apparatus of claim 14 wherein said back wall has an outside surface, an adhesive is disposed on said outside surface, and said adhesive having a removable sheet whereby said back wall is attachable to another planar surface when said removable sheet is removed from said adhesive. 19. The apparatus of claim 14 further including an area on an outside surface of said first and second front walls, said area having indicia printed within said area. 20. The apparatus of claim 14 further including a holder dimensioned to receive said back wall, said first and second rear side walls, and said first and second front walls when in said collapsed state, said holder having an open bottom through which a portion of said back wall, said first and second rear side walls, and said first and second front walls protrudes, and said holder having a back surface attachable to another planar surface.


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Key IP Translations - Patent Translations


stats Patent Info
Application #
US 20090152283 A1
Publish Date
06/18/2009
Document #
11955597
File Date
12/13/2007
USPTO Class
220720
Other USPTO Classes
International Class
65D25/20
Drawings
3



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